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Road Bike for 260lbs Rider under $1000?

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Road Bike for 260lbs Rider under $1000?

Old 02-04-17, 12:41 PM
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Road Bike for 260lbs Rider under $1000?

I currently have 3 bikes:

- Fuji Tahoe 27.5 1.5 Disk (Mountain Bike)
- Trek FX 7.2 (Hybrid?)
- Trek Calypso Cruiser

Of my 3 bikes I use my Trek FX 7.2 the most. All three of my bikes have no trouble supporting my weight 5'10", 260 pounds).

While I like my Trek FX, I am tired of riding upright (especially against the wind). Also, it feels a bit cramped (same with my other two bikes). My goal is to ride at least 20 miles per day eventually adding more miles. On weekends I would like to ride longer distances/more mikes. My riding would take place on asphalt roads, streets and paved bike paths.

I would like to get a road-style bike, but I know very few of them will support my weight. Even if a bike is rated for 260 pounds, I'm assuming gravity (especially when landing after a bump or other obstacle in the road) will momentarily increase the weight placed on the bike. Many road bikes pride themselves in being light weight, but that also sometimes means easier to bend/break.

I have been looking into getting a tour bike as they are designed to hold extra weight and have similar design/ergonomics as a road bike. I like the idea of a slightly longer frame, drop handlebars, thinner/skeeker tires for speed, etc.

I have narrowed my search down to a Fuji Tour Bike as it is not too expensive and seems to have what I'm looking for. My only hesitation is that it weighs 29 pounds. While I'm not looking for a race bike, my fear is that this heavier bike would feel like a ton of bricks after a few miles.

Also, I would like to buy new as I am limited due to very few bike shops in my area. Iam not mechanically inclined, so buying a used "fixer-upper" would not work for me.

Any suggestions?
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Old 02-04-17, 04:38 PM
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So Ironically this video just came out a few days ago outlining your problem:

TL : DW Version: Look for an Endurance Road bike with 32 spoke wheels or more and if the bike can fit 28c tires or more then you'll be in good shape.

If you want something more akin to your Trek FX in terms of tire width I would look at anything along the lines of Adventure/Gravel bikes, or inexpensive Cyclocross bikes.

Since you're buying locally do you know the brands that you have access to? That'll help narrow things down further based on your budget.
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Old 02-04-17, 05:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Nikon Fan
...

I would like to get a road-style bike, but I know very few of them will support my weight. Even if a bike is rated for 260 pounds, I'm assuming gravity (especially when landing after a bump or other obstacle in the road) will momentarily increase the weight placed on the bike. Many road bikes pride themselves in being light weight, but that also sometimes means easier to bend/break.

...
I ride a very light bike, with 20 spoke per wheel, with no problem. I am currently 273 pounds. I think that disproves the light is weak argument, and I would say it also disproves "few road bike support heavies". My main issue was finding a bike my size because the model was too popular.

Just checking REI you find lots of bike below $1K or just about. Also buying a 2016 model from a LBS could get you a major rebate. That is what I did, and I got 25% down.

As for the weight of the bike, it is an issue only when going up. And even then it is the weight of the whole (bike + you) that matters.

The main thing is finding the right size, with the right fit. If you don't get the right size to start with, you may end up with an unpleasant bike to ride, regardless of all attempts ($$$) to make it fit you. A bike you don't ride is one expensive piece of junk...
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Old 02-04-17, 05:27 PM
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[QUOTE=PatrickR400;19357553]

As for the weight of the bike, it is an issue only when going up. And even then it is the weight of the whole (bike + you) that matters.

QUOTE]

I've kind of wondered about this too (total weight of rider plus bike). Many years ago I weighed 145 pounds, and while I wasn't super conditioned athlete, but I'd expect that if I shaved five or six pounds off a bike it might really make a difference. Now I weigh maybe 100 pounds more than that, and I can't figure out if the five or six pounds between a light bike and a touring, gravel or adventure bike would make that much of a difference.

Depends on where you ride and how you ride, but in general I'd say stick with higher quality but somewhat larger tires (which touring, gravel, and adventure, and cross bikes can easily handle, even if their OEM rubber isn't great or ideal for your kind of riding) and somewhat stouter wheels (which these types of bike will generally come with).

I carry loads often enough so I'm partial to touring bikes myself. Their generally more relaxed angles and stable straight line ride suite me fine, but that's not to everyone's tastes, and the gravel/adventure/cross targeted bikes are a growing marketing category.
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Old 02-04-17, 08:27 PM
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I ride Touring bikes with butterfly bars a lot. But I did buy a Giant Defi 2 used last summer, quick and responsive for me, I love it.
Good advice in regards to the Touring bike angle. My next Touring bike is going to be a Marin Four Corners over anything else I have seen. Reason, the Briffters, and disk brakes. I test rode two bikes with drop bars, and bar end shifters, not my style. I really thought I was headed for a Trek 520, nope.

https://www.marinbikes.com/ca/bikes/d...orners#image-2

Hope this helps,

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(great gearing too)
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Old 02-04-17, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Nikon Fan
I currently have 3 bikes:

- Fuji Tahoe 27.5 1.5 Disk (Mountain Bike)
- Trek FX 7.2 (Hybrid?)
- Trek Calypso Cruiser

Of my 3 bikes I use my Trek FX 7.2 the most. All three of my bikes have no trouble supporting my weight 5'10", 260 pounds).

While I like my Trek FX, I am tired of riding upright (especially against the wind). Also, it feels a bit cramped (same with my other two bikes). My goal is to ride at least 20 miles per day eventually adding more miles. On weekends I would like to ride longer distances/more mikes. My riding would take place on asphalt roads, streets and paved bike paths.

I would like to get a road-style bike, but I know very few of them will support my weight. Even if a bike is rated for 260 pounds, I'm assuming gravity (especially when landing after a bump or other obstacle in the road) will momentarily increase the weight placed on the bike. Many road bikes pride themselves in being light weight, but that also sometimes means easier to bend/break.

I have been looking into getting a tour bike as they are designed to hold extra weight and have similar design/ergonomics as a road bike. I like the idea of a slightly longer frame, drop handlebars, thinner/skeeker tires for speed, etc.

I have narrowed my search down to a Fuji Tour Bike as it is not too expensive and seems to have what I'm looking for. My only hesitation is that it weighs 29 pounds. While I'm not looking for a race bike, my fear is that this heavier bike would feel like a ton of bricks after a few miles.

Also, I would like to buy new as I am limited due to very few bike shops in my area. Iam not mechanically inclined, so buying a used "fixer-upper" would not work for me.

Any suggestions?
Check out the Giant Contend SL Disc 2, its wheels have 32 spokes, which should take away the biggest problem you would be likely to encounter.

They don't list a weight, but my guess is it would be about 22lbs.
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Old 02-04-17, 08:45 PM
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Check out cyclocross bikes. They have a more upright riding position and can run wider road tires for more comfort.
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Old 02-04-17, 09:23 PM
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Save Up to 60% Off Disc Brake Road Bikes - Motobecane Omni Strada Expert

Beefy rims and tires, so it's not a lightweight. Shimano 105 drivetrain for $1000.
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Old 02-04-17, 09:24 PM
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I'm about your size and weight; I find a 58cm frame to be most comfortable. I have over 30 vintage steel bikes, fabricated with Reynolds 531, Reynolds 501, Columbus SL, SLX, True Temper, Columbus Tenax, Tange, and Champion tube sets. They seem to be adequately strong and provide great comfort and performance.

I would recommend focusing on touring bikes for all day comfort. The Fuji Tour Bike is worth a test ride. That rear rack on it weighs 2-3 lbs, so it is actually a 26-27 lb. bike.

At $1000, an REI Novara Safari or Randonee is a very good value. The 2017s haven't been introduced yet, but if there is a store nearby, you might look to see if leftover 2016's are available.
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Old 02-04-17, 09:48 PM
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Thanks everyone! The local bike shops in my area onky carry 4 brands: Fuji, Trek, Giant and Schwinn. No REI's anywhere near me. Other options would be (gasp) department store bikes from Walmart, Dick's Sporting Goods, Target or Sam's. 😕

I was thinking of changing out the knobby tires of my Fuji Tahoe as a temporary sollution (at least until I can drop enough weight to fit on a road bike), but I can't seem to find any semi-slick tires (27.5).
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Old 02-04-17, 10:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Nikon Fan
can't seem to find any semi-slick tires (27.5).
https://www.compasscycle.com/product...ts/tires/650b/
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Old 02-04-17, 10:54 PM
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Check out the trek crossrip. It might be a touch over your budget but if you can swing it, it's a great bike. I love mine and it has served me well. https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bi.../1374000-2017/
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Old 02-04-17, 11:35 PM
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edit again Missed that the OP is in Australia and not mechanically inclined, so OP ignore below (leaving it as it might help some one else)


editing........this looked good until I double checked and they only have XS left
Charge Plug 5 Road Bike -- 2015

If the OP is handy or even if they pay a bike shop for set up this is worth considering from nashbar

$850 (sign up for email and you can routinely get 20% of coupons which put this in the $680 range) for steel frame, cyclo cross with mostly 105 components, 32 spoke rims




https://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/st...50_-1___204687
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Old 02-04-17, 11:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Nikon Fan
Thanks everyone! The local bike shops in my area onky carry 4 brands: Fuji, Trek, Giant and Schwinn.
The Fuji Touring would be rugged and versatile.
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Old 02-05-17, 08:10 AM
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[QUOTE=FrankHudson;19357597]
Originally Posted by PatrickR400

As for the weight of the bike, it is an issue only when going up. And even then it is the weight of the whole (bike + you) that matters.

QUOTE]

I've kind of wondered about this too (total weight of rider plus bike). Many years ago I weighed 145 pounds, and while I wasn't super conditioned athlete, but I'd expect that if I shaved five or six pounds off a bike it might really make a difference. Now I weigh maybe 100 pounds more than that, and I can't figure out if the five or six pounds between a light bike and a touring, gravel or adventure bike would make that much of a difference. ...
If a fit 145 pound rider shave 5-6 pounds off his bike it will make a difference in acceleration. It is a bit like a light car with a big engine compare to a heavy truck with a small engine.

My comment was a bit 50000 feet, as there are many benefits to a light bike. There are probably more benefits to a light rider.
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Old 02-07-17, 12:54 PM
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here are some I found on Jenson, good selection for the dollar

https://www.jensonusa.com/Road-Bikes/...e-2015?cs=Blue

Charge Bikes Plug 4 Bike 2016 > Bikes > Road Bikes | Jenson USA

Orbea Avant H10 Disc Bike 2014 > Bikes > Road Bikes | Jenson USA

Masi Gran Corsa 105 Bike > Bikes > Road Bikes | Jenson USA
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Old 02-07-17, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Nikon Fan
I have been looking into getting a tour bike as they are designed to hold extra weight and have similar design/ergonomics as a road bike. I like the idea of a slightly longer frame, drop handlebars, thinner/skeeker tires for speed, etc.

I have narrowed my search down to a Fuji Tour Bike as it is not too expensive and seems to have what I'm looking for. My only hesitation is that it weighs 29 pounds. While I'm not looking for a race bike, my fear is that this heavier bike would feel like a ton of bricks after a few miles.

If those few miles are uphill, yes, you're going to think the bike is like a ton of bricks. Don't worry, though, it's mostly you. The Fuji is a good road bike for a light rider with a load, or a heavier rider who is a load (like me and, apparently, like you). Fuji somehow specs new bikes that are much less expensive than similar bikes from other manufacturers. On the weight question, you can replace the tires with something lighter when you wear out the OEM tires and save a pound.


Make sure you work with the bike shop to get the bike fit to you, and you'll never regret it. Also, ask the mechanic to go over the wheels; in the below-$2,000 realm of bicycles, wheels are machine built and almost never adequately tensioned or stress-relieved.
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Old 02-07-17, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Nikon Fan
(at least until I can drop enough weight to fit on a road bike)
You will be fine on a road bike. I started at almost 270 on an Al frame with 32 spoke rear, 28 spoke front. Never broke a spoke. Still riding the bike 50 pounds later.
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Old 02-07-17, 07:49 PM
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Update:

Thanks everyone! I walked into my LBS yesterday and spoke with the owner (great guy, very knowledgeable).

He went over the specs of the bikes I had in mind and ended up making a recommendation for a Fuji Tread 1.3. He gave me a great deal on it and also took the time to explain the advantages of the upgraded parts on that model.

I also explained my (obvious) weight concerns. He also let me ride a bike he had in his shop which was comparable in size/geometry of the Tread 1.3 I ordered.

I'm looking forward to it's arrival especially after the ride I did today on my old Trek FX 7.2. Wind gusts were at 25mph. I was only able to do 12 grueling miles. Hopefully my riding position will improve with the Tread 1.3.
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Old 02-08-17, 06:42 AM
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Enjoy the new bike. The plus side of the market going to heavy, disc-equipped road bikes is that they need stronger wheels. Helps out us clydes.
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Old 02-15-17, 05:30 PM
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My bike arrived today (Fuji Tread 1.3)! Unfortunately today's weather is the worst we have seen all week (winds gusting over 20mph, rain on and off, dark gray clouds). Hopefully tomorrow it will clear up so I can try this bike out! ☺

First impression; nice looking bike. Not as slim or sleek as other road bikes, but nice overall look. Weight is 24 pounds (not as heavy as I thought it would be, definitely not super feather light either). Overall geometry of the bike seems to fit well for my height/size (sat on it at the shop before bringing it home). Tires are a little wider than I expected (pleasant surprise).

I'll spend the rest of today putting the lights and water bottle brackets on it. Not sure about the saddle it came with. Looks nice, has a bit of padding. I'll get a better feel for it after I ride a few miles this weekend. Worst case I'll probably just get another saddle like I did with all my other bikes in the past. ☺
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Old 02-15-17, 07:57 PM
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You seem to believe that your 260 lbs are a huge consideration in the durability of the type of bike you buy... it's not - especially in the sub $1000 range. Maybe in the $3500+ range, and even then, I think most of that concern should be pointed at the wheel set, not the frame.
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Old 02-16-17, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Nikon Fan
My bike arrived today (Fuji Tread 1.3)!
AWESOME!! post pics when you get it out on the road/trail. Cool the bike came with TRp spyre brakes those are nice and are around $80 each! IMO better then the Avid BB5/7 they use to equip
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