Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Too Fat to Ride??

Old 07-21-17, 09:35 PM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Too Fat to Ride??

Hello All!

I've been glancing around here for about a week trying to learn as much as I can about getting started but after today's experience I thought I would ask for some suggestions/advice.

I'm a 27 year old female from Columbus, Ohio. I started my weight loss journey about a year ago and I've gone from 460 pounds to 375 pounds. Now that I'm relatively lighter I've been looking into cycling as a form of exercise. Anyway, I went to a local bike shop today to check out some bikes and they wouldn't even give me the time of day. One of the sales guys came over and basically told me I'm too fat to ride. I left the shop more than a little frustrated and defeated.

Does anyone have any advice as far as selecting a bike? I was looking at a specialized roll low step bike as a starter until I'm in better shape to get a road bike. Would this bike work? I'm worried my weight will be too much on it.

Thank you in advance for any help, I really appreciate it!
Chunky_Monkey is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 10:39 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
kevrider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: northern nevada
Posts: 360

Bikes: way too many

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 3 Posts
see this website:
https://media.specialized.com/suppor...0079230_R1.pdf

according to that, weight limit for the Roll is 300 lbs. they don't list a bike with a higher limit. who knows how much of that is influenced by lawyers, as opposed to engineers.

kudos on your progress, thus far. i agree with you that cycling is a great tool for weight loss, almost as good as swimming or xc skiing, but easier to access. good luck continuing the journey.
kevrider is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 10:50 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
mcmoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Transplanted to PDX area
Posts: 480

Bikes: Trek Silque S, Bianchi Aria e-Road

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Oh, go back to the shop and slap that sales guy silly! What a jerk.

Okay, bikes technically have weight limits, and many of them list 300 lbs for bike + rider (and anything else you carry). But in practice, these are conservative limits. And, if you continue on your weight-loss journey, you're going to be below that limit before you know it!

I think you should reward yourself for your amazing progress with a Trek FX Stagger (or a similar entry level fitness hybrid with a step-through frame). While bikes with spring-mounted seats and such may look comfy, they won't serve you well in the long run. You're young and getting fit. Get yourself a fun bike and ride it! It might be best to ride on pavement or fairly smooth trails (e.g., crushed limestone), and avoid jumping curbs or otherwise stressing the bike. But your worst case scenario is your wheels going out of true or spokes breaking (and I really doubt that's going to happen).

You'll be amazed how enjoyable riding is! It's simply fun to be able to MOVE the way a bike allows.

I think a basic fitness hybrid will serve you well for a while. If the price ($400-500) is too high, find a used "hard tail" dirt bike (i.e., one without a rear suspension). That will provide you with a good start... but you'll be ready for (and wanting) a better bike within 6 months, tops.

Have fun and keep up your amazing progress!
mcmoose is offline  
Old 07-21-17, 11:38 PM
  #4  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 268

Bikes: 2013 Trek Domane 5.2; 1986 Cannondale R800

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Bike shops are currently in crisis mode trying to keep their heads above water and remain relevant.
In a previous life I worked in a couple as a wrench while still working with customers (inevitable, if you ask me) so I feel strongly when I say you should go back and let the manager know what happened, and if you don't get a satisfying response you should remind them how small the internet has made the world and come back here and name names.
That's disgusting behavior and if it's any consolation, I was treated similarly by a wrench in a bike shop in Saratoga NY last year when I showed up for an appointment to have something checked out on my bike. I left with significantly heightened blood pressure after enduring 15 minutes of flawed technical knowledge and criticism of my bike (a Trek Domane).
ChuckD6421 is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 03:50 AM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
bigbiker1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Midwest
Posts: 334

Bikes: 2013 All City Mr. Pink, 2016 Jamis DXT Comp

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 177 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Chunky_Monkey
Hello All!

I've been glancing around here for about a week trying to learn as much as I can about getting started but after today's experience I thought I would ask for some suggestions/advice.

I'm a 27 year old female from Columbus, Ohio. I started my weight loss journey about a year ago and I've gone from 460 pounds to 375 pounds. Now that I'm relatively lighter I've been looking into cycling as a form of exercise. Anyway, I went to a local bike shop today to check out some bikes and they wouldn't even give me the time of day. One of the sales guys came over and basically told me I'm too fat to ride. I left the shop more than a little frustrated and defeated.

Does anyone have any advice as far as selecting a bike? I was looking at a specialized roll low step bike as a starter until I'm in better shape to get a road bike. Would this bike work? I'm worried my weight will be too much on it.

Thank you in advance for any help, I really appreciate it!
Ugh! I agree wit Chunky_Monkey, make sure the manager or owner knows what happened!

I started riding two months ago, and I was actually too ashamed to admit how much I actually weighed. I admitted to 350 but I was actually over 380lbs. After two months I am closing in on 350. The salesman where I got my bike was the opposite, he told me if I stuck with it riding 10 miles would be as easy as "eating f***ing Mcdonalds" as he put it lol. I thought he was nuts at the time, but I am closing in on 400 miles on my new bike. I rode 26 miles yesterday and if I can do 21 today I will hit 100 miles for the week, I did 97 last week. I bought a Jamis DXT Comp and I love it. The tires that came with it were awful for hard pack (very thin sidewalls) but other then that I have had no issues with it at all. Buy a bike that you are comfortable with and make sure its the right size, a helpful LBS should be able to help you with that. The only thing that my salesman mentioned was I might end up breaking spokes on the rear tire and if that happened he would build me a heavy duty one, but that has not been an issue yet.
bigbiker1 is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 04:13 AM
  #6  
Junior Member
 
Snyder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: currently Utah
Posts: 11

Bikes: A Pretty teal Coaster with a Pimp basket!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
God, I love it!! You guys are frickn rad! I would take their advice on the bikes, but one thing, I as a lady with a shanayna bootay, is get a good seat. Ive always had the luxury of a comfy bottom and ive tried those, hell all of those seats, get a nice full sized seat. Trust me, it makes a difference. Congrats on your progress!
Snyder is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 07:28 AM
  #7  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thank you all for the support and advice! I'm planning on going today to shop around a little more. Planning on stopping by a Trek store to check out the Stagger and a few other local places. I've budgeted about $500-$600 for a bike.

I've noticed a few have mentioned the actual saddle, but should I be looking at the type of clamp they put on the seat post too? I wasn't sure with my weight if I need to worry about that shifting.
Chunky_Monkey is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 08:04 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Aahzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Union, KY (Near Cincinnati)
Posts: 509

Bikes: '17 Trek FX2, '19 Trek FX 3 Disc

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Liked 214 Times in 87 Posts
Hiya - just to add, I'm 360, and ride a Trek FX2 - the weight limits are conservative. Find a better bike shop, and be sure to leave a Yelp review for the shop that mistreated you.
Aahzz is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 09:16 AM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
dagray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Boardman, Oregon, USA
Posts: 1,748

Bikes: Orbea Orca,Raleigh Talus 29er, Centurion Le Mans 12 speed

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 164 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 42 Posts
I am down to 345-350 and ride an Orbea Orca (carbon fiber race geometry road bike), before that from 400-360 pounds I rode a Raleigh aluminum frame road bike.

Buy the bike you want to ride and ride. Yes you will probably have to upgrade the wheels and maybe find tire you like (I run 700x25 tubeless tires made by Maxxis).

Specialized often has "lawyer limits" on the maximum weight of the bike.

What ever bike you buy make sure to get it properly fitted to you (this is more than just determining frame size), and then play the saddle game to find a saddle that is comfortable for you (too wide and you will be uncomfortable due to throwing your hips out of alignment).

Most importantly is to have fun.

Get out there and ride
dagray is offline  
Old 07-22-17, 01:19 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
baron von trail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 3,509

Bikes: 3 good used ones

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Any bike with wide wheels and a sturdy frame should be fine. Another option is a trike. They can handle more weight than a two-wheeler. But, I'd say a weight that is under 400 should be fine on a heavy duty bike with two wheels.
baron von trail is offline  
Old 07-23-17, 10:31 AM
  #11  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Update.....

Yesterday I went to a few different bike shops. After some detailed talk with a manager at the trek store I ended up getting a 2017 Trek XF 3. They were running a sale on the older model with the release of the 2018 bikes.

I'm a little nervous with the thinner tire but he assured me I should be ok as long as I stay away from rough roads and such. Keeping my fingers crossed.

Thanks again for all the suggestions! Hoping to take it out today to get more familiar with riding a bike again.
Chunky_Monkey is offline  
Old 07-23-17, 01:22 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Aahzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Union, KY (Near Cincinnati)
Posts: 509

Bikes: '17 Trek FX2, '19 Trek FX 3 Disc

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Liked 214 Times in 87 Posts
I think you'll be very happy with your choice.
Aahzz is offline  
Old 07-23-17, 07:31 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
mcmoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Transplanted to PDX area
Posts: 480

Bikes: Trek Silque S, Bianchi Aria e-Road

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
I love my FX 3 (Trek used to call them 7.3). I consider it my quarter horse (while my road bikes are my thoroughbreds). It's been a wonderful, faithful steed.

Go ride it like you stole it! Have fun!
mcmoose is offline  
Old 07-24-17, 06:26 AM
  #14  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 18

Bikes: 84 Trek 660, 89 Trek 850

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Aluminum frame with a carbon fork? Damn, that's a sweet ride! Hope you enjoy it!
Doctor Memory is offline  
Old 07-24-17, 07:08 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 5,982

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 2007 Dahon Boardwalk, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International, 2006 Felt F65, 1989 Dahon Getaway V

Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1365 Post(s)
Liked 1,687 Times in 831 Posts
Originally Posted by Chunky_Monkey
Thank you in advance for any help, I really appreciate it!
I don't usually check in with the Clyde/Athena forum, but this thread title caught my eye. This is yet another example of why bikeforums is so wonderful!

Here is crowd-sourced help, advice, shared experiences and encouragement all in a positive manner! Thanks to everyone who contributed, this young gal now has the confidence and encouragement to enjoy bicycling and all its life-enhancing benefits, both physical and mental.

This made my week!

(I would print this thread and send it to the first bike shop)

Happy cycling, Chunky_Monkey and go, Go, GO!
BobbyG is offline  
Old 07-25-17, 10:47 AM
  #16  
Junior Member
 
Cwtowns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Longmont Colorado
Posts: 16

Bikes: Kona Blast

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
For some perspective I started riding at 470 pounds. I had a couple of bike shops treat me the same way until I found the shop that I still use today.

They were extremely helpful and put things into perspective for me. They offered to build me a custom over-built bike and rims if I was really worried about it but told me the bike they suggested for me (Kona Blast) was built and designed to land 3-story jumps with a rider so it would be more than fine with me riding around town/trails. They only modification they did was added the stiffer front forks for me. I still use that shop and I still have that bike 3 years later.

My advice is find a shop that will treat you with respect and help you get properly fitted it makes a WORLD of difference. Those shops that don't want to deal with you - walk away their loss.
Cwtowns is offline  
Old 07-25-17, 04:51 PM
  #17  
Full Member
 
PatrickR400's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Laval, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 406

Bikes: 2015 Ghost Panamao X3; 2015 Specialized Diverge Comp Carbon

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Chunky_Monkey
Yesterday I went to a few different bike shops. After some detailed talk with a manager at the trek store I ended up getting a 2017 Trek XF 3. They were running a sale on the older model with the release of the 2018 bikes.

I'm a little nervous with the thinner tire but he assured me I should be ok as long as I stay away from rough roads and such. Keeping my fingers crossed.

Thanks again for all the suggestions! Hoping to take it out today to get more familiar with riding a bike again.
I would not be concerned about the 32C tires. I rode on that width for a good while with no puncture. Just keep them well inflated.

Back to the original question; you are not too fat to ride. The sales person at the first LBS is an idiot.
PatrickR400 is offline  
Old 07-25-17, 05:09 PM
  #18  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You guys are all awesome! I don't think I would have had the guts to pull the trigger on this otherwise. I appreciate it so much. Now the hard work is up to me!

So far I've only done about 8 miles on my new ride but I'm really enjoying it. I'm trying to be patient with gaining distance. My legs seem to be shot by the end of two miles, not to mention I'm not use to the whole bike seat thing. Sorreeeee!!!! I'm trying to stick with the stock seat for now, although I did buy a gel cover. I guess that's not a good idea?
Chunky_Monkey is offline  
Old 07-25-17, 06:56 PM
  #19  
Full Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 268

Bikes: 2013 Trek Domane 5.2; 1986 Cannondale R800

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Well played, Chunky. you're in the game now.
Getting used to the saddle will be mostly a matter of time spent on it. After a couple weeks of regular use, if you're still getting "broken in to it", then maybe time to look at other saddle options. But you need to toughen up first.

https://www.bikeforums.net/images/smilies/thumb.gif
ChuckD6421 is offline  
Old 07-25-17, 07:17 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Aahzz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Union, KY (Near Cincinnati)
Posts: 509

Bikes: '17 Trek FX2, '19 Trek FX 3 Disc

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Liked 214 Times in 87 Posts
Originally Posted by Chunky_Monkey
You guys are all awesome! I don't think I would have had the guts to pull the trigger on this otherwise. I appreciate it so much. Now the hard work is up to me!

So far I've only done about 8 miles on my new ride but I'm really enjoying it. I'm trying to be patient with gaining distance. My legs seem to be shot by the end of two miles, not to mention I'm not use to the whole bike seat thing. Sorreeeee!!!! I'm trying to stick with the stock seat for now, although I did buy a gel cover. I guess that's not a good idea?
Any distance is good distance. I could only do 2 miles at a time my first week. A month and a half later and I do 7-10 daily and 18 on Sunday. In my case, I've ridden every day but 4 in that time. Ride as much as you feel comfortable, and as much as is fun, and the distance will come.
Aahzz is offline  
Old 07-25-17, 10:35 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
CommuteCommando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Southern CaliFORNIA.
Posts: 3,079

Bikes: KHS Alite 500, Trek 7.2 FX , Masi Partenza, Masi Fixed Special, Masi Cran Criterium

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 27 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 12 Posts
My first advice is find another shop. Not all are run and staffed by jerks. If it is even a little hilly where you live get one with gears and learn to use them. Start slow. When you have had enough, stop. Over time you will find your self going farther and faster. It will not be a fast journey, but at some point you will find yourself addicted. Have fun.
CommuteCommando is offline  
Old 07-27-17, 12:22 PM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
mcmoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Transplanted to PDX area
Posts: 480

Bikes: Trek Silque S, Bianchi Aria e-Road

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
What works as a great bike saddle varies a lot from person to person. Sadly, most saddles that come stock on bikes are great for nobody!

I suggest you get used to your bike for a month or so before spending the $$ for a new saddle. The trick, in general, is to find a saddle that puts its two rear "support points" directly under your sit bones.

To find your sit bones, you can either go to a bike shop that has (I kid you not) a sit-bone measuring device. The good thing about that is the device gives you an actual measurement you can use when shopping saddles.

Alternatively, you can sit on your hands and feel where the bones are. This is quick and easy, but it's hard to estimate (in millimeters) how far apart the bones are.

The good news is that the bones don't move much as we gain or lose weight. About all that changes the distance is having babies (okay, there may be a few other things... but our skeletal structure is pretty stable).

You're going to have to spend $40-80 for a good saddle. You'll probably want a women's saddle. Terry makes some great ones... so do other vendors, but Terry started out making bikes and saddles for women, so they have a leg up, so to speak.

Increase your distance gradually. Try for 10-20% farther each week. That doesn't sound like much, but like the magic of compound interest, it will get you to a good distance before you know it!

And most of all, stay safe and heathy, and HAVE FUN!
mcmoose is offline  
Old 07-27-17, 06:02 PM
  #23  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mcmoose
What works as a great bike saddle varies a lot from person to person. Sadly, most saddles that come stock on bikes are great for nobody!

I suggest you get used to your bike for a month or so before spending the $$ for a new saddle. The trick, in general, is to find a saddle that puts its two rear "support points" directly under your sit bones.

To find your sit bones, you can either go to a bike shop that has (I kid you not) a sit-bone measuring device. The good thing about that is the device gives you an actual measurement you can use when shopping saddles.

Alternatively, you can sit on your hands and feel where the bones are. This is quick and easy, but it's hard to estimate (in millimeters) how far apart the bones are.

The good news is that the bones don't move much as we gain or lose weight. About all that changes the distance is having babies (okay, there may be a few other things... but our skeletal structure is pretty stable).

You're going to have to spend $40-80 for a good saddle. You'll probably want a women's saddle. Terry makes some great ones... so do other vendors, but Terry started out making bikes and saddles for women, so they have a leg up, so to speak.

Increase your distance gradually. Try for 10-20% farther each week. That doesn't sound like much, but like the magic of compound interest, it will get you to a good distance before you know it!

And most of all, stay safe and heathy, and HAVE FUN!
I keep reading about sit bones. The measuring system at my LBS didn't look very Athena friendly. Lol This one was a pad of memory foam you sit on and then measure where the marks are. I probably would have smushed the whole thing. Over the last couple days it's gotten much better. I'll look into a Terry once I up my mileage but right now I'm not sore. Thanks for the suggestion. Yay for progress!

Speaking of progress .....I upped my mileage from 2 to 4 yesterday. I probably could have gone longer but didn't want to push my luck. This last ride was in a flat neighborhood so I might stick with the flat terrain for awhile. I can see how this might get addicting quickly though. First time in awhile I've enjoyed being active.
Chunky_Monkey is offline  
Old 07-28-17, 09:34 AM
  #24  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 4

Bikes: Davinci Joint Venture, Comotion Primera, Trek Domane 4.3D

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I agree with everyone about the bike shop. Make sure the shop doesn't support that first sales person who didn't want to help you because of your weight. If that is the shop's general attitude then find another shop. I walked into my bike shop weighing 335lbs and haven't been on a bike since my teens. They were very helpful and put me on a Trek Verve 3, and talked to me about what accessories I would want down the road and insisted on a helmet as well. They were very helpful on sizing, fitting, and letting me "try out" different seats until I found one that worked for me. They have earned my business as I have since bought a road bike for myself and 2 other bikes for other of my family.

I attribute biking as the main reason I have been able to lose over 100lbs, so good luck!
Pappamoto is offline  
Old 07-28-17, 01:33 PM
  #25  
Big Boned Biker
 
IAMAMRA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: NW Indiana
Posts: 478

Bikes: Raleigh Detour 4.5, Trek Crossrip Elite '14

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Not much to add except that I started riding around 450# and they wouldn't even let me try the bike until I payed for it first.
IAMAMRA is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.