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Which wheelset would you choose from this list? (for a clydesdale)

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Which wheelset would you choose from this list? (for a clydesdale)

Old 08-09-17, 10:18 AM
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Which wheelset would you choose from this list? (for a clydesdale)

Hi guys,

I'm looking at buying a new wheelset after breaking my second spoke on the rear wheel of my Easton EA70's. I've had these wheels for several years and never had any issues. I think either my weight has become a factor (hovering around 250 or so) and/or the spokes are getting shot. I have been told by my LBS that once you break one spoke, it weakens the others even more, which just leads down the path to breaking more--and the eventual rebuild or replacement. My bike is a Cervelo R3 SL.

This is the first time I've researched wheelsets (boy, there is a lot of info). I've read everything from needing 28 to 36 spokes in the rear, and I have emailed each of these manufacturers regarding my specs, bike and weight. Prices ranges are from $465 to $600 shipped. These are my current finalists. I'm open to other suggestions, but I'm leaning towards #1 or #3. I should probably go with #3, but I've read that #1 is an excellent wheel-builder. I also listed the weights, but since I'm 250, does it really matter? Would I notice a difference in a heavier wheel? As a reference, I think my Eastons are 1650-1750g.


#1
Neugent Cycling A310CWC (24mm wide rim)
24/28 spoke wheelset with Sapim Laser spokes.
Weight: 1500g
Price: $520


#2
ROL Volant R/T (23mm wide rim) (using a DT Swiss 340 rear hub)
28/32 spoke wheelset using DT Swiss 340 rear hub and DT Swiss Competition spokes
Weight: approx 1750g
Price: around $600


#3
Velocity Chukker (24mm wide rim)
36/36 spoke wheelset with DT Swiss Competition spokes
Weight: 2300
Price: $465
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Old 08-09-17, 11:00 AM
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#3 is overkill

#2 is ok, but for $600 you can do a lot better (cue @psimet -- Road Wheels - PSIMET Custom Wheels )

#1 might be your ticket; I had a Neuvation set years ago and liked them well enough, though the rear wheel didn't like to stay true. 24/28 spoke count is the lowest I'd go. I'm sure others will chime in.
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Old 08-11-17, 01:00 PM
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#3, properly built (tensioned and stress relieved) will last forever.

Are looking for extreme reliability, or minimum weight or somewhere in between.

I build my own wheels, and have 100lbs or so on you. My commuter (wheel failure is not an option) has HUB FT WM MT1110 QR SF 40 SB and HUB RR WM MT1110 QR SF 9sCAS 40x135 SB; Wheelsmith DB15 spokes on the front and Wheelsmith DB14 spokes on the back with Velocity DYAD rims.
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Old 08-11-17, 01:44 PM
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I would think wheel weight is important regardless of your body weight. Heavier wheels take more work to accelerate or decelerate. You want to minimize that no matter who you are. Not the same as weight on the frame.
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Old 08-11-17, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by nfmisso
#3, properly built (tensioned and stress relieved) will last forever.

+1


At 250#, I'd skip the 24/28 spoke wheels in choice 1.
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Old 08-12-17, 05:36 AM
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jsbach- if your R3 SL can accommodate 25mm wide rims, consider the H+S Archetype. Not only will you save some $, but very durable wheels and even available with a 36H option.

Here's a 32H wheelset, Ultegra hubs, DT spokes:
H Plus Son Archetype Wheelset Shimano Ultegra 6800 hubs 32h [74762] - $275.00 Velomine.com : Worldwide Bicycle Shop, fixed gear track bike wheelsets campagnolo super record vintage bike
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Old 08-13-17, 02:45 PM
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Wheels aren't always about spoke count, but rather how rigid the wheel itself is.

I spent the money and picked up a set of Rolf Prima "Vigor RS (OEM)" wheels which are a 33mm deep V wheel with a 24 spoke count front and back.

The spokes go directly to the center of the wheel and don't have spoke nipples as they take a special socket to adjust (and the tire and rim tape has to be removed).

At my 350 pounds these wheels just got their first adjustment after 1000 miles, and part of those miles were with me at 365 pounds.

The 32 spoke wheels on a 105 hub worked well for a little over 1000 miles with me taking the back wheel in every few hundred miles to be trued and spokes tensioned/replaced.

The ride on the Rolf wheels is superior to the ride on the Orbea 32 spoke wheels (yes in 2013 Orbea used their own wheels or rebadged wheels from someone else).
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Old 08-13-17, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by jsbach
#3
Velocity Chukker (24mm wide rim)
36/36 spoke wheelset with DT Swiss Competition spokes
Weight: 2300
Price: $465
I had a wheelset built up that was nearly what you describe above, except with the Velocity Dyad 700c rim instead of the Velocity Chukker. Extremely solid, not a creak or whimper on any surfaces over past year of moderate use. Would prefer them to be lighter, but they're not all that bad for a strongly-built "clyde" set.
  • Rims: Velocity Dyad 700c (24mm OD, 18.6mm ID), 36H spoke count
  • Hubs: Shimano Deore XT M756 disc 36H (9spd, 100mm/135mm, 9mm QR)
  • Spokes: DT Swiss 2.0mm straight-gauge spokes w/ DT Swiss brass nipples
  • Weight: 2040gr (pair)

These should easily handle 300lbs (rider+bike+gear) on typical mixed city "commuting" surfaces.

"Over" built? Probably. But, bomb-proof.
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Old 08-14-17, 07:47 AM
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Thanks for all the suggestions and guidance. I still haven't pulled the trigger and bought anything yet. I think I've become stuck in the analysis of it all. I think my problem is too many options, so I don't know what to buy. Also, I think a lot of this comes down to the wheel-builder and how good they are at their craft. As for wheel-builders, I feel as though I wouldn’t have any issues with wheels from Neugent, Rol, Rolf or PSIMET. This only leaves Velomine; where I have read a few instances where guys had to take their new wheels to their LBS to have the spokes re-tensioned after a couple hundred miles or so.

Speaking of Velomine, just after I posted my thread, I did find another option of the HPS Archetypes with Ultegra hubs. I was looking at the 36h spokes, but I think perhaps 32h is more than enough. I also emailed PSIMET and they recommended an A100H with a 28/32 spoke set-up. Or, they can do the lighter Dyad rim in 28/32 if I didn't want to A100H.

I checked the Rolfs (I like their racy-looking spoke layout) but they are expensive and way out of my price range. Their site has a wheel adviser where you enter your weight and such--and it provided selections based on this info. The cheapest wheels they recommended based on my specs are the Elan ES or Vigor ES at $850. Maybe I can pick them up cheaper on the used market, but definitely not new.

So at this time, from everything I have researched (and suggestions received for all of you) the most economical, bang-for-the-buck wheelset is the H Plus Son Archetype at Velomine... basically $300 shipped for the 32h Ultegra or $315 shipped for the 36h Ultegra. Is this too cheap? Velomine hand builds these wheelsets, right? I found a place someone had posted on another thread that had builds wheels and they offer the Archetype too… Sugar Wheel Works. Their price STARTS at $575. Is there is difference in wheel-builder quality here, or is it just type of store, economics and sales volume? Like I said, way over-analyzing I guess…
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Old 08-14-17, 08:02 AM
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Wholesalers that ship built wheels to bike shops can assemble a set of wheels from hubs and rims in their inventory..at their costs,
So combined built wheels delivered via a bike shop, cost less than retail for the parts,

heavy rider a mix of 32 front, 36 rear both 3 cross will be quite adequate .. have a shop keep an eye on maintaining tension and truing,

so one or 2 spokes don't flex individually from lower tension, but the wheel acts like a whole..




...
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Old 08-14-17, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by jsbach
Hi guys,

I'm looking at buying a new wheelset after breaking my second spoke on the rear wheel of my Easton EA70's. I've had these wheels for several years and never had any issues. I think either my weight has become a factor (hovering around 250 or so) and/or the spokes are getting shot. I have been told by my LBS that once you break one spoke, it weakens the others even more, which just leads down the path to breaking more--and the eventual rebuild or replacement. My bike is a Cervelo R3 SL.

This is the first time I've researched wheelsets (boy, there is a lot of info). I've read everything from needing 28 to 36 spokes in the rear, and I have emailed each of these manufacturers regarding my specs, bike and weight. Prices ranges are from $465 to $600 shipped. These are my current finalists. I'm open to other suggestions, but I'm leaning towards #1 or #3. I should probably go with #3, but I've read that #1 is an excellent wheel-builder. I also listed the weights, but since I'm 250, does it really matter? Would I notice a difference in a heavier wheel? As a reference, I think my Eastons are 1650-1750g.
Yes, you'll notice a heavier wheel. Lots of people will tell you that it doesn't matter but I've never found that to be true. Ride a steel wheel (very heavy) and then swap to lightweight aluminum wheel and the difference is immediately apparent. Adding almost a pound to your rotating weight isn't a way to go.

On to the wheels:

Originally Posted by jsbach
#1
Neugent Cycling A310CWC (24mm wide rim)
24/28 spoke wheelset with Sapim Laser spokes.
Weight: 1500g
Price: $520
Low spoke count and light spokes is just asking for trouble. Each spoke has to carry more load so each spoke is stressed more than a higher spoke count wheel.


Originally Posted by jsbach
#2
ROL Volant R/T (23mm wide rim) (using a DT Swiss 340 rear hub)
28/32 spoke wheelset using DT Swiss 340 rear hub and DT Swiss Competition spokes
Weight: approx 1750g
Price: around $600
Better but you can do even better. More a bit later.

Originally Posted by jsbach
#3
Velocity Chukker (24mm wide rim)
36/36 spoke wheelset with DT Swiss Competition spokes
Weight: 2300
Price: $465
Unnecessary. Not the 36 spoke part but the heavier rim part.

Because of the way that a wheel is constructed, the weight of the rim has little to nothing to do with the strength and durability of the wheel. The rim does little more than serve as a convenient place for attaching the spokes and providing something to hold the tire in place. Adding about 1000g just slows the wheel down.

What you should really be looking at is a stronger spoke which is one with a thicker head at the bend. This article explains it nicely.. These kinds of spokes are called "triple butted" because they have a thicker head (2.2 to 2.4mm), thinner midsection (1.5 to 1.8mm) and slightly thicker end (2.0mm). The DT Competition are a double butte spoke (2.0/1.8/2.0mm). DT makes a triple butted spoke called the Alpine III. Sapim (Force), Wheelsmith (DH13) and Pillar (PSR triple butted) all make a version of this spoke as well. The Force and DH13 are only double butted but they are butted where it counts.

If you were to use one of these kinds of spokes with any of these rims and hubs, you'd have a much stronger, more durable wheel.

Another hub to consider is the White Industries T11. It uses a light but strong titanium freehub body which reduces the weight of the wheel significantly. I've built a set of wheels around the T11s with Pillar spokes and a Velocity A23 rim which are every bit as light as your first wheel but have 32 spokes front and rear and will outlast any of the above.

The problem, however, is going to be finding a builder who will build with triple butted spokes. For some reason, wheel builders resist the concept. I get around that by just building my own. It's not all that difficult and actually kind of fun. It cuts down on the labor cost as well.
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Old 08-14-17, 10:14 AM
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universalcycles will build with triple butted spokes
check them out
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