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Foot pain? New clipless

Old 09-02-17, 01:03 PM
  #26  
esskay1000
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I had sharp pains on the balls of my feet a while back as well with SPD-SLs. In my simplistic way of thinking (and my DIY attitude) I just went to CVS and bought some of those Dr. Scholls inserts for $10. It actually worked. But I realize others could have arthritis or blood-flow type issues.
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Old 09-02-17, 01:32 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Staypuft1652 View Post
Yeah not sure then. Something I had read a while back also mentioned, depending on shoe size and fit, there are aftermarket insoles available, with more arch support. Something about nerve pressure. Perhaps in the future that may be an idea as well.

I think I got the arch support part wrong, but theres a bump in some strategic spot that has to do with lessening nerve pressure.

Edit: Its called a metatarsal button. Heres an example:Specialized High Performance Footbeds - mikesbikes.com
I used to have an intense burning pain in my feet. I was told that I might have "dropped metatarsal heads" in my feet, so I tried metatarsal buttons (https://www.walmart.com/c/ep/metatarsal-pads). I found that they were too bulky for me. Instead, I now use corn pads (https://www.drscholls.com/products/c...cushion-discs/) and they provide enough support for my feet to alleviate any pain.
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Old 09-02-17, 08:54 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Jean_TX View Post
I used to have an intense burning pain in my feet. I was told that I might have "dropped metatarsal heads" in my feet, so I tried metatarsal buttons (https://www.walmart.com/c/ep/metatarsal-pads). I found that they were too bulky for me. Instead, I now use corn pads (https://www.drscholls.com/products/c...cushion-discs/) and they provide enough support for my feet to alleviate any pain.
interesting, i will have to look into this
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Old 09-02-17, 09:09 PM
  #29  
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A trick I learned from an REI salesman years ago (for new hiking boot) that I now use for most of my cycling shoes and rides - wear silk liner socks under your cycling socks. Makes almost every pair of footwear better in all weather conditions. (The socks are ankle length, I turn down enough of the top so they are ~1/2" below the tops of whatever socks I'm wearing. No one else needs to know. I never get blisters, they (and my feet and other socks) smell much better after rides and I never notice I'm wearing them once my shoes are on.

Those socks are cheap and last a long time. There are no drawbacks/

Ben
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Old 09-02-17, 09:18 PM
  #30  
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And something else you can do that I have done to two pairs of cycling shoes; shoes that fit my feet really well but I could never get the straps comfortable. I cut the stitching and removed the straps. Went to Tandy Leather, got a grommet kit with the brass grommets and tools (you'll need a punch or drill and a hammer) and installed shoe laces. What an improvement! With a nice even lacing, the pressure down is also even and the soles of my feet say thanks. Those two pairs are more comfortable than any of my strapped or buckled shoes, even when I miss by some lacing them up.

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Old 09-08-17, 09:46 PM
  #31  
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Ok, so I am thinking it may be the metatarsal issue at this point. I put in the massaging gel inserts from my work boots and significantly loosened my shoes. They are lace up with one velcro strap at the top. Laces super loose, tight strap, inserts, increased cadence. So car i am getting 20-25 miles before the pain starts. It starts with a little ache and turns into bad pain fast. Just got some metatarsal support pads, gonna try them tomorrow and see if that helps. Still probably gonna get new wide shoes in the near future. will update after my ride tomorrow
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Old 09-09-17, 07:33 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Jean_TX View Post
I used to have an intense burning pain in my feet. I was told that I might have "dropped metatarsal heads" in my feet, so I tried metatarsal buttons (https://www.walmart.com/c/ep/metatarsal-pads). I found that they were too bulky for me. Instead, I now use corn pads (https://www.drscholls.com/products/c...cushion-discs/) and they provide enough support for my feet to alleviate any pain.
You really need to support the entire foot. The Icebug insoles that were mentioned previously do that AND have the metatarsal button built into the insole which many insoles do not. These little oknto be exceptional insoles.

Really look at the insoles that came with your shoes and compare them to add in insoles. The insoles in about 90% of cycling shoes are pure junk.

This all presumes of course that your shoes fit properly. If you have wide feet look at Sidi shoes that have a "mega" version. These were able to fit my kids who both have high volume wide feet. Lake is another brand that accommodates wide feet.

J.
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Old 09-09-17, 10:32 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
You really need to support the entire foot. The Icebug insoles that were mentioned previously do that AND have the metatarsal button built into the insole which many insoles do not. These little oknto be exceptional insoles.

Really look at the insoles that came with your shoes and compare them to add in insoles. The insoles in about 90% of cycling shoes are pure junk.

This all presumes of course that your shoes fit properly. If you have wide feet look at Sidi shoes that have a "mega" version. These were able to fit my kids who both have high volume wide feet. Lake is another brand that accommodates wide feet.

J.
Didn't see the icebug mentioned before. Kinda pricey at $46. If these pads I got fix the problem the Icebugs might be a better long term solution though.
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Old 09-09-17, 11:13 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Shadowx View Post
Didn't see the icebug mentioned before. Kinda pricey at $46. If these pads I got fix the problem the Icebugs might be a better long term solution though.
I have had metatarsal arch problems for a long time. I have high arches which just compounds the problem. I also have a background in ski boot fit for racers so I've spent some time studying this problem to the point where I pretty much make my own insoles from one of the heat moldable products out there since I know what works for me.

Cycling shoes have some the same problems and characteristics of ski boots with the rigid soles and the tight grip on the foot. I'd say the little gel pads are good for experimentation, but won't last for the long term. I'd also tell you that unless you adequately support the main arches on your foot, a lot of what you are doing will likely not help. So you really need to start with stabilizing the main arch with an insole. From there, I'd go about experimenting with the gel pads.

If that main arch is not supported, as you press down on the pedals hard, that arch partially collapses as it's supposed to do (i.e. as a suspension for your body and which we don't want for cycling shoes or ski boots), your foot spreads out/slides in the shoe and puts pressure in all sorts of other places it's not supposed to be. Sometimes you can even take shoes/boots that seem to small and make them fit by putting in place a proper insole and stopping the movement and compression of the foot. For proper fit, it can just be a millimeter that makes a big difference.
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Old 09-09-17, 11:43 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
I have had metatarsal arch problems for a long time. I have high arches which just compounds the problem. I also have a background in ski boot fit for racers so I've spent some time studying this problem to the point where I pretty much make my own insoles from one of the heat moldable products out there since I know what works for me.

Cycling shoes have some the same problems and characteristics of ski boots with the rigid soles and the tight grip on the foot. I'd say the little gel pads are good for experimentation, but won't last for the long term. I'd also tell you that unless you adequately support the main arches on your foot, a lot of what you are doing will likely not help. So you really need to start with stabilizing the main arch with an insole. From there, I'd go about experimenting with the gel pads.

If that main arch is not supported, as you press down on the pedals hard, that arch partially collapses as it's supposed to do (i.e. as a suspension for your body and which we don't want for cycling shoes or ski boots), your foot spreads out/slides in the shoe and puts pressure in all sorts of other places it's not supposed to be. Sometimes you can even take shoes/boots that seem to small and make them fit by putting in place a proper insole and stopping the movement and compression of the foot. For proper fit, it can just be a millimeter that makes a big difference.
thanks, I'm pretty sure I have high arches. If these pads help i'm gonna get the icebug inserts next payday. Never really had these problems before, trying to get it figured out and fixed.
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