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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 11-12-17, 11:02 PM   #1
mr,grumpy 
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Smashed my fridge ankle today!

I am having a not fun time trying to master the art of "clipping in". I have MTB style pedals on my around town bike and never have trouble clicking in to them but the road bike style pedals on my road bike get me every time, or nearly every time. That second foot just never goes in right. Today it slipped off the peddle and slammed into the crank. Now I'm sore and cranky.

Any tips or tricks to getting it in there on the first shot other than practice?
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Old 11-12-17, 11:21 PM   #2
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Why not just stick with the MTB style pedals? (I do.)
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Old 11-12-17, 11:23 PM   #3
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Because they came with the bike and Im not super excited about buying another set of peddles. Other than that, no real reason.
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Old 11-12-17, 11:26 PM   #4
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You don't mention what brand or type road pedals and cleats,which is important because they vary in basic design.

Many are variants of the original Look system with a rigid slide in to and a latch at the back. The key is to flip the pedal and catch the toe, then keep forward pressure on it until you can press straight down to engage the latch.

As long as you maintain forward force the toe will stay latched even if the cleat isn't actually latched. Roadies who learned with clips and straps don't have problems with this design because they've been pushing forward all along, but I can imagine where those who haven't developed the habit may have some issues.

BTW- when coming to a light or stop, I'll twist out sideways, then catch the toe so I can continue pedaling gently without latching the clear.

Small question. Is a fridge ankle an artifact of auto(in)correct?
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Old 11-13-17, 12:07 AM   #5
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You don't mention what brand or type road pedals and cleats,which is important because they vary in basic design.

Many are variants of the original Look system with a rigid slide in to and a latch at the back. The key is to flip the pedal and catch the toe, then keep forward pressure on it until you can press straight down to engage the latch.

As long as you maintain forward force the toe will stay latched even if the cleat isn't actually latched. Roadies who learned with clips and straps don't have problems with this design because they've been pushing forward all along, but I can imagine where those who haven't developed the habit may have some issues.

BTW- when coming to a light or stop, I'll twist out sideways, then catch the toe so I can continue pedaling gently without latching the clear.

Small question. Is a fridge ankle an artifact of auto(in)correct?
Um.... it's a triangle. Shimano brand. What type exactly, IDK but it seems that your advice might work on them. Yes, BF auto "corrected" my semi-cuss word. Its OK though. Its better this way.
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Old 11-13-17, 12:14 AM   #6
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Um.... it's a triangle. Shimano brand. What type exactly, IDK but it seems that your advice might work on them. Yes, BF auto "corrected" my semi-cuss word. Its OK though. Its better this way.
Yes, basic Look concept. The cleat is triangular, but is really a toe piece that slides into the loop, and a rear area that latches when you step down hard. It's down to engage, and sideways at the rear to disengage, with the toe being first in last out.
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Old 11-13-17, 09:23 AM   #7
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Yes, basic Look concept. The cleat is triangular, but is really a toe piece that slides into the loop, and a rear area that latches when you step down hard. It's down to engage, and sideways at the rear to disengage, with the toe being first in last out.
Adopt a routine.

For me it's right foot in the pedal, push off, do a half rotation of the crank, left foot in the pedal.

Stopping, it's left foot out, lean slightly to the left, brake and then after the left foot touches down, then the right foot comes out.

It's always the same. Makes for a muscle memory type situation
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Old 11-14-17, 12:25 PM   #8
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Exactly what problem are you having?

Sit on the seat with non drive side foot on the ground. Clip the other foot (right foot) into the pedal while stopped. Bring the top of the foot to 12 o'clock on the crank. Push off and pedal on right foot simultaneously. Clip in left foot while rolling and pedal away.

Stopping is pretty much the same as your SPD pedals.

Shouldn't be that much different unless either cleat is mounted incorrectly and it doesn't work right.

J.
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Old 11-14-17, 01:02 PM   #9
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Exactly what problem are you having?

Sit on the seat with non drive side foot on the ground. Clip the other foot (right foot) into the pedal while stopped. Bring the top of the foot to 12 o'clock on the crank. Push off and pedal on right foot simultaneously. Clip in left foot while rolling and pedal away.

Stopping is pretty much the same as your SPD pedals.

Shouldn't be that much different unless either cleat is mounted incorrectly and it doesn't work right.

J.
I always "miss" the second foot clip and have to try to peddle it with just the shoe sole for half a rotation and my foot inevitable slips off and smashes off of something. Starting on any sort of an up-hill is instant crash territory.
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Old 11-14-17, 01:50 PM   #10
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Three things:

1. Clipping in is two motions. The first is to hook the tip of the cleat under the lip on the pedal. This should not be a hard push and you can, and should, do it gently.

2. Once this is complete, step downwards with your heel. It's kind of a levering action instead of a stomp straight down.

3. I'm not that familiar with your particular pedals, but with Looks, which I used before I switched to Speedplay, there is usually an adjustment for the tension it takes to step in. Set it looser rather than tighter. It doesn't (shouldn't) make any difference for retention, but it does make it easier for both clipping in and out needing less force. As you get more confident, you can turn it to be harder. On pedals where I have such an adjustment, I typically set it fairly firmly so there is no chance of an inadvertent release sideways. But then I've been riding clipless since they were first invented back in the '80s.

One of the reasons I switched to Speedplay besides the float is that it is two sided so no pedal flipping is required and it is a single motion and pretty much a stomp down with a largely self locating cleat and pedal arrangement.

J.
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