Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-13-17, 11:36 PM   #1
maddesa
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Newbie Advice Sought

Hello all, new member. My name is Mike and I live a little west of St. Louis, Missouri. As a potential new cyclist I have a couple questions which I hope you'll help me with. As a youngster I did a lot of cycling around the neighborhood. As a 42 year old not so much any more. It's probably been 30 years since I've ridden a bike. At any rate, I'm also a very big guy, currently around 425ish pounds. I've recently initiated some lifestyle changes and am down from a high of almost 600lbs. I would like to include cycling as a source of exercise but I'm baffled by the enormous number of bicycles and their seeming infinite combinations. These are the couple things I would prefer in a bike:

Not sure of the terminology but I'd like a bike wherein I sit upright and not forward like a mountain bike.
I'd like to sit lower to the ground rather than higher, it would make me feel more stable if my feet would rest flat on the ground when not on the pedals. (I'm 6 feet tall). Other than these couple things I don't really care what the bike looks like aesthetically, I'd just like something functional and durable.
I would love some advice on what bikes would be suitable for me. I don't mind paying a little extra for customization if there aren't any bikes like this "out of the box" so to speak. Thanks so much in advance for the advice!
Mike
maddesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-17, 12:53 AM   #2
Big Dave Crowe
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 46
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddesa View Post
Hello all, new member. My name is Mike and I live a little west of St. Louis, Missouri. As a potential new cyclist I have a couple questions which I hope you'll help me with. As a youngster I did a lot of cycling around the neighborhood. As a 42 year old not so much any more. It's probably been 30 years since I've ridden a bike. At any rate, I'm also a very big guy, currently around 425ish pounds. I've recently initiated some lifestyle changes and am down from a high of almost 600lbs. I would like to include cycling as a source of exercise but I'm baffled by the enormous number of bicycles and their seeming infinite combinations. These are the couple things I would prefer in a bike:

Not sure of the terminology but I'd like a bike wherein I sit upright and not forward like a mountain bike.
I'd like to sit lower to the ground rather than higher, it would make me feel more stable if my feet would rest flat on the ground when not on the pedals. (I'm 6 feet tall). Other than these couple things I don't really care what the bike looks like aesthetically, I'd just like something functional and durable.
I would love some advice on what bikes would be suitable for me. I don't mind paying a little extra for customization if there aren't any bikes like this "out of the box" so to speak. Thanks so much in advance for the advice!
Mike
OK MIKEY ..Welcome and thanks for coming.

Now there's no such thing as spending "a little extra" when it comes to getting a bike for heavy riders. If you want something durable
(keeping you from breaking, flipping or tripping) you will need to spend more money than the average weight rider. However, I'm going to save you time and money right now.

1. You want full extension of your legs when peddling. Otherwise you run the risk of hurting your knee's (Google this topic for more details.

2. You want a slant tube bike that will allow you to get on easier.

3. You need a steel frame that will hold your weight and take the road chatter/vibrations.

You simply Ineed a cruiser with gears.

Now I've seen people on YouTube riding an electra townie (I have one) that's over 400 lbs.

Vid 1. Watch "Biking for Biggies review Electra Townie" on YouTube
https://youtu.be/_P6SOe333j8

Vid 2. Watch "A fat man and his bike" on YouTube
https://youtu.be/jogsXjZXq3M

If you want to take his word for it, then that's your bike. However, I heard of someone who was 350 plus, bend the frame post and another cracked the chainstay. Someone may tell you to beef up the wheels and install a more durable bottom bracket and pedals. Well that's great on paper except for the fact that making the wheels bombproof will stress your frame more. If it's a quality steel frame no problem, but the Electra is aluminum.

I have 2 recommendations.

1. Buy a recreational worksman bike and the guessing game is over. Ive personaslly talked to the owner on the phone. Call them, tell them your situation and needs, done!

https://www.worksmancycles.com/classic-cruiser-test.html

2. Buy a used chicago schwinn 5 speed cruiser or an early 80's schwinn mountain bike with 36 spoke araya rims. I know of people in the 400 plus that rode them everyday stock.
Big Dave Crowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-17, 07:40 AM   #3
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 7,264
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 620 Post(s)
There is an issue with keeping both pedals and ground within easy reach.
It’s fairly important to have good leg extension when pedalling for the health of your knees.
There are bikes that allows this, they’re called ”pedal-forward” or ”crank-forward” or even ”semi-recumbent” bikes.
The problem with these is that the design make it harder to ”go light” - to get out of saddle.
The big thing with that is that you end up sitting like a deadweight all the time, which is bad for comfort and bike survival.
It’s far easier on both bike and butt if you can get out of saddle when passing a bump.
While riding, stability has near nothing to do with reaching the ground or not.
Dealing with stops is easy.
Get out of saddle a few second before coming to a full stop. Keep one foot on the lowest pedal while reaching for the ground with the other. Once stationary, move the other foot to the ground too, if desired.
dabac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-17, 10:55 AM   #4
mthorste
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Electra Townie Rider

I started riding again at the weight you are at or slightly higher. I purchased a Townie for some of the reasons you mentioned. The crank forward design lets you have the extension your legs need to ride efficiently without being in a forward position from the waist up. They are a very comfortable ride. I did have to have a rear wheel built because I was popping spokes. It cost me about $60 for a new rim/spokes. My LBS just put the original tire on it. The only drawback to this particular rim is it is not a quick release hub but it's been worth the trade-off. I haven't broken a spoke since I got the new wheel. There are things you can't do like someone mentioned. You can't stand up on the pedals because of the forward design but let's face it - when you are our size you're probably not going to doing a lot of that anyway until we drop some poundage. I would take a serious look at the Townies. They come in different gear options. Mine is a 7spd as I live in Central Florida and the highest hills in this area are the land fills! But they do come in fixed gear and 21 speeds if you live in a hilly area. Check them out. I love mine.
mthorste is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-17, 11:39 AM   #5
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 7,264
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 620 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mthorste View Post
The crank forward design lets you have the extension your legs need to ride efficiently without being in a forward position from the waist up.
There are bikes thatíll keep your upper body vertical w/o sacrificing the ability to get out of saddle.
Townies - the TYPE, not the model. AKA Dutch bikes. A hybrid with a bar and stem swap.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mthorste View Post
You can't stand up on the pedals because of the forward design but let's face it - when you are our size you're probably not going to doing a lot of that anyway until we drop some poundage.
This isnít about grinding it out minute after minute, itís about unweighting the saddle for a few seconds at a time when passing a foreseen bump.
dabac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-17, 02:43 PM   #6
maddesa
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Thank you so much for the great advice guys (or girls)! It is very much appreciated. Looks like either an Electra Townie or a Worksman cycle is in my near future. I was looking at the websites for these and I'm wondering what upgrades you guys would recommend getting for a guy of my weight? Thank you so much again.
maddesa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-17, 04:46 PM   #7
mthorste
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dabac View Post
There are bikes thatíll keep your upper body vertical w/o sacrificing the ability to get out of saddle.
Townies - the TYPE, not the model. AKA Dutch bikes. A hybrid with a bar and stem swap.

This isnít about grinding it out minute after minute, itís about unweighting the saddle for a few seconds at a time when passing a foreseen bump.
Absolutely correct!
mthorste is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-17, 07:09 AM   #8
mthorste
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddesa View Post
Thank you so much for the great advice guys (or girls)! It is very much appreciated. Looks like either an Electra Townie or a Worksman cycle is in my near future. I was looking at the websites for these and I'm wondering what upgrades you guys would recommend getting for a guy of my weight? Thank you so much again.
Like I mentioned, I just had a beefier rear wheel built. 36 spoke count vs the factory installed 32, 12g spokes vs the 14g and the rim I have is a bit wider as well. The hub is a bit beefier too and did not come with quick release. My wheel only cost me about $60 but I'm sure you could get an even better one but why? Mine works great and is only temporary to me losing enough weight to where I can put the factory wheel back on. In fact, my plan is to lose enough weight over time to where I can purchase a nice road bike. I love my Townie (my wife has one too) and I will always ride it even if I do get a road bike.
mthorste is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:29 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION