Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Looking again for bombproof wheel

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Old 11-26-17, 09:39 PM
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illusiumd
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Looking again for bombproof wheel

Looking for advice on new rear wheel build - rim brake - non-disc. I'm weighing about 240 these days and have a terrible habit of hitting nasty potholes/curbs. Had the Velocity A23 36H laced to WI T11 - destroyed that rim over about two years.

Then did HED C2 32H laced to Ultegra in May of 2016. Just bent that - so LBS says I have about a couple months left on the HED.

Any other rims besides the Dyad, A719, or Archetype - that I should be looking at? Anyone had experience with Kinlin? Was looking at the Kinlin XR31...

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Old 11-27-17, 01:05 AM
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SethAZ
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I've put thousands of miles (probably 7000 or so) on a rear wheel I built with the Velocity A23 OC (asymmetric version) and 32h Shimano Ultegra hub. It's still fine, and I put those miles on it weighing from 35 to 50 lbs more than you. The asymmetric version helped me get my NDS spokes a little higher compared to the DS spokes than the symmetric version would have. But if your trouble is physically damaging the rim with impacts, not spoke related, then I guess the obvious question is: what tires, and how wide of tires are you running this whole time?

For most of the time on that wheel I've run 25mm Grand Prix 4000 or else Gatorskin (which I despise), and the last 1300 miles or so I've had a 28mm Grand Prix 4000 on it at lower pressure. If you can fit a wider tire on it I'd highly recommend that you give it a try. It absorbs far more vibration and minor impacts than the 25mm tires did.

The Dyad is certainly a much heavier rim than the A23 OC, and I hear good things about clydesdales and Dyad rims.

But honestly, it sounds to me like you're seeing some combination of either insufficient tire volume to help absorb vibration and impacts, not unweighting the wheels when you ride over things, some kind of destructive riding technique like furious mashing rather than spinning, or some combination of all of the above. Because a well-built 36h wheel with that A23 really shouldn't be just breaking like this.
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Old 11-27-17, 05:43 AM
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I never worry about popping spokes any longer after switching to a wheel with 12-gauge spokes vs the normal 14-gauge. Plus they are cheap, much cheaper than many other "high-quality" rims and I'm not dependent on a superb wheel builder. https://www.amazon.com/Wheel-Master-.../dp/B006FCHTZQ

BTW, I use to always pop spokes, but since getting this rim, I've got (so far) over 6,000 miles on it and not a single popped spoke, even after getting a wrench stuck in the spokes while riding, which only bent one spoke.
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Old 11-27-17, 06:42 AM
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Colnago Mixte
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Try these:

https://www.rolwheels.com/wheels/wheel/race-slr

They are rated up to #240. I have ridden them as a 220 pounder, and they are the only wheels I have ever owned that I can torque out on steep hills in the big ring, and get zero rubbing sounds from the spokes. I'm picky about wheels being quiet and these are the only ones I have absolute confidence in. Have owned them since 2011 and they have never even needed truing.

Expensive, yes, but these are the strongest 1500 gram wheels that I know of.
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Old 11-27-17, 09:54 AM
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If you're breaking wheels riding over curbs, maybe you should look at bigger wheels; the kind that take 4" tires. I doubt it's your weight that's causing problems, just your riding habits.
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Old 11-27-17, 12:01 PM
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SethAZ
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Originally Posted by Colnago Mixte View Post
Try these:

https://www.rolwheels.com/wheels/wheel/race-slr

They are rated up to #240. I have ridden them as a 220 pounder, and they are the only wheels I have ever owned that I can torque out on steep hills in the big ring, and get zero rubbing sounds from the spokes. I'm picky about wheels being quiet and these are the only ones I have absolute confidence in. Have owned them since 2011 and they have never even needed truing.

Expensive, yes, but these are the strongest 1500 gram wheels that I know of.
If he's destroying 36h wheels on the A23 rim he'll absolutely destroy the 24h front/28h 2X rear wheels you linked. I agree with pdlamb that the OP is simply not realistic about what he should and should not be riding over, plus probably insufficient tire volume and some destructive pedaling techniques. If he wants bomb proof first he's got to realize that the best thing to do is stop riding over bombs.
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Old 11-27-17, 02:33 PM
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illusiumd
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Originally Posted by SethAZ View Post
But honestly, it sounds to me like you're seeing some combination of either insufficient tire volume to help absorb vibration and impacts, not unweighting the wheels when you ride over things, some kind of destructive riding technique like furious mashing rather than spinning, or some combination of all of the above. Because a well-built 36h wheel with that A23 really shouldn't be just breaking like this.
On both the HED and the A23 I ran/run 28 GP 4 Seasons @ 80psi - is that about right?
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Old 11-27-17, 02:37 PM
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illusiumd
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Originally Posted by SethAZ View Post
If he's destroying 36h wheels on the A23 rim he'll absolutely destroy the 24h front/28h 2X rear wheels you linked. I agree with pdlamb that the OP is simply not realistic about what he should and should not be riding over, plus probably insufficient tire volume and some destructive pedaling techniques. If he wants bomb proof first he's got to realize that the best thing to do is stop riding over bombs.
True this. I have to admit - riding in dense urban traffic it's sometimes impossible for me to see these things coming cause I'm too focused on car doors and pedestrians in rush hour mayhem. The bomb I hit on the A23 flatted me out. I don't know what bent the HED. I do wonder is 80psi on a 23mm rim with a Conti 4Season too low?

I think I'm going to re-purpose my old T11 hub with a new 36h Archetype and take a wheel building class.
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Old 11-27-17, 03:43 PM
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Going back to first principles for a moment here, unless you go with some forged iron wagon wheel, it should be understood that it's your tire that must survive the impacts when you run over/on top of things that you shouldn't. If you're getting actual rim strikes on pothole edges and such then pretty much no rim choice out there is going to save you.

With that in mind, you have to figure out what tire and pressure combination will keep your rim from bottoming out on potholes/low curbs/large rocks/ridges on the road, whatever it is you're hitting. If your rim is bottoming out on things at your current pressure with 28mm tires, then the pressure isn't high enough. Or, if it is, then you need to spot these impacts with enough advance warning to "unweight" the tires by getting your butt off the seat a little so your arms and legs can act as shock absorbers, and all that unsprung body weight isn't focused down through the seatpost over that rear wheel.

Keep in mind I currently weigh something like 45 lbs more than you, but 80 psi on that tire sounds a little low to me. I'm currently riding with 85 psi rear/70 psi front with 32mm Compass tires that have significantly more volume than your tires have. On my previous bike I rode a 28mm Continental Grand Prix 4000 (that inflates to more like 30mm) in the rear at around 95 psi, with the 25mm Grand Prix 4000 at maybe 90 psi. I didn't have any problems at those pressures, and they were nice and comfortable (the 32mm Compass tires/latex tubes are way, way more comfortable though).

Looking at the Continental website it says 95-115psi for the 28mm 4 Seasons. Obviously that doesn't mean just go for the max, but it definitely implies that for your weight, and for the roads you ride on, 80psi at least in the rear is too low. That would explain the pinch flat and rim damage from whatever hole you rode over. At, say, 95 or 105 psi your wheel might have survived that.

What I'd suggest is that you go with the widest tires your bike will fit (within reason). If you can do 30 or 32mm, then go for it. If 28mm is your limit, that's cool too. Start up near the higher end of the allowable pressure range for your tire and rim. Ride that for a while. Experiment with lowering that a little at a time to find the pressure that you feel provides you the greatest comfort while also preventing the rim from bottoming out on these road hazards you keep hitting in your urban minefield of a cycling route. Then ride on.

If you've still got that 36h T11 hub or that 32h Ultegra hub I'd just get something like the A23 OC rim (assuming this is rear wheel we're talking about) and either get it done, or do it yourself. Use some reasonable double-butted spokes, get your tire pressure thing figured out, and you'll probably be just fine.
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Old 11-27-17, 06:54 PM
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Bill in VA
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Originally Posted by illusiumd View Post
True this. I have to admit - riding in dense urban traffic it's sometimes impossible for me to see these things coming cause I'm too focused on car doors and pedestrians in rush hour mayhem. The bomb I hit on the A23 flatted me out. I don't know what bent the HED. I do wonder is 80psi on a 23mm rim with a Conti 4Season too low?

I think I'm going to re-purpose my old T11 hub with a new 36h Archetype and take a wheel building class.

80psi in a 28mm tire for what you are doing it far too low, especially if you are in the clyde range.


This may help... Bicycle tire pressure calculator I will go higher, but never lower.

I always ran 100-105 PSI in my Conti Grand Prix 4000S II in 28x700c before I switched to Compass Stampede Pass 32X700c tires. My rims are Alexrims 23mm (similar in design to the Velocity A23) on Shimano Tiagra hubs. I am 230 and have never has an issue in 2.5 years, but I am not commuting with crazy drivers and pedestrians.

Is this more a rim or spoke issue? Where are the spokes breaking? Try looking in the mechanics forum as they were talking about a spoke by DT called the Alpine and building heavy duty, but lighter wheels. It is a heavier gauge butted spoke, but with a longer thicker area at the bend. Also do use brass nipples not alloy. As spokes rarely break in the center, why add the weight and material in the middle? Spend the $$ and go with a heavier gauge butted spoke. I have been kicking around a spare set of wheels for serious gravel and the Dyads are a big candidate as they are only 1mm wider than the 23 I have, but have that triple chamber design.

The Velocity Dyad rims are stronger than the A23 at a cost of weight. Remember that weight at the rim is more noticeable than weight in the hub. You will notice the extra weight in a sluggishness, but is can be offset to a degree with a lighter larger sectioned tire and butted spokes. When I bought my Bianchi Volpe cross bike it had 28mm Vittoria Randonneur tires, a very heavy touring tire. I was shocked at how out of shape I felt and how sluggish everything handled. I checked out the tire weight and found they were 440g! each. I moved to the 28mm Conti GP 4000S II and was very pleased since they felt better than any tire I ever used, in fact they were better than budget tubulars.

My prior bike had a set of custom wheels I had built on Campy Tipo hubs with 14/15/14 butted spokes and 27" Weinmann concave rims (also a triple chamber design) that weighed about what a Dyad runs. They were popular for tandems and touring bikes in their day, but could handle 25-32mm tires. I had those wheels for 35 years and they never broke a spoke or needed truing. This was with long gaps of non-use (years) and rider weights up to 270.

However no rims allow hitting a curb or deep pothole with a soft tire. Additionally, once the tire is compressed enough to allow direct impacts to the rim - bikes, cars or trucks - the rim will probably dent or fail, not to mention snakebit tires.

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Old 11-27-17, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill in VA View Post
My prior bike had a set of custom wheels I had built on Campy Tipo hubs with 14/15/14 butted spokes and 27" Weinmann concave rims (also a triple chamber design) that weighed about what a Dyad runs. They were popular for tandems and touring bikes in their day, but could handle 25-32mm tires. I had those wheels for 35 years and they never broke a spoke or needed truing. This was with long gaps of non-use (years) and rider weights up to 270.
@Bill in VA , the DT Swiss Alpine III spokes have that 2.34mm or so butted end by the j-bend. Sapim Force spokes do it too, though it's only half as much thicker at something like 2.18mm rather than the usual 2.0mm. Still, that .18mm extra at the j-bend will add only a microscopic amount of weight (and at the hub where it matters little anyway) for probably a significant improvement in resistance to breakage at that location.

I'm actually building myself a set of "aero-clyde" wheels right now that will be seen as a complete abomination by just about everyone. The weight weenie and "aeromax" guys will puke. The clydes will just shake their heads at the profligate waste of money for benefits they will see as illusory for a large rider. I am really liking the concept, though, and if I do a good job on the build I think I'll be very pleased with them.

I'm using Chinese carbon rims (from light-bicycle.com) that are 28mm wide and 46mm deep while weighing the same as the Stans Grail rims I've currently got. These will support the 32mm Compass tires really nicely, or the 35mm Compass tubeless I want to try next. The wider rim should allow the wider tires to have a better shape. The transition from tire to rim will be more aero than going all the way down to a 23 or 24mm rim, and the extra 20mm or so of depth should also improve the aerodynamics of the wheel.

I ordered Sapim CX-Sprint spokes for the front wheel, and Sapim Force spokes for the rear. The CX-Sprint spokes are just a thicker, stronger version of the aerodynamic CX-Rays, that also cost half as much. The Force spokes are the 2.0/1.8/2.18 triple-butted ones that should be stronger at the j-bend, so the rear wheel will have very robust spokes with less chance of breakage. I didn't go with the CX-Sprints for the rear wheel because whatever aero benefit they would have over round spokes is far less than they will have in the front, and the Force spokes will add some durability against breakage due to the thicker j-bend area.

The hubs I ordered are 36h White Industries CLD. I'm constantly tempted to regret not ordering the rims in 32h for the front, but I just remind myself that I'm a heavy rider (currently around 287lbs and dropping), and even when I reach my dream weight in another year or two I'll still be a heavy rider (dream weight for me right now is 220-230, realistically I'll probably not go lower than the 240s). I am sure I would have been fine with 32h for the front (the wheels I built for my previous bike have 32 spokes both front and rear and have been fine for thousands of miles), but going from 32h to 36h will add just a small amount of weight, while fulfilling my design goal of building a very tough, durable clyde wheelset.

Everyone will think this is the stupidest build they've ever seen. I don't really care. It's an idea I latched onto and then just couldn't let go until I'd tried it: can a very tough and durable wheelset be built that is superclyde-proof that also has as much aerodynamic and nice wide tire support as can be salvaged from a really tough build?

What I don't like are the clyde wheels I often see discussed where to get tough they use really heavy or non-aero stuff and just say "hey it's a tough clyde build, aero is completely irrelevant." Thing is, it's relevant to me. I may be big, but I still want to go fast, and when I ride with much thinner guys on their aero bikes I want as much of those same benefits as can still be salvaged while starting out with a very tough and durable combination. I think my component choices put an appropriate priority on toughness and durability, but without giving in to the temptation to think that if it can withstand a superclyde it has to be super ugly, super heavy, and completely non-aero.

I guess I'll find out.

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Old 11-28-17, 01:08 PM
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Bill in VA
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I made a slight error in my post above. The Velocity Dyads are like a heavier duty A23 (Dyad=525g and A23=450g). They are 1mm wider. Both are twin chamber designs.

When I mentioned the triple chamber design, I was thinking of the Atlas @620g and 25.4mm wide (1").

Interestingly Velocity does not show the Dyad in 700c in their Clyde/Athena section, but does have it in the tandem, touring, and cyclocross sections.

Their Twin Hollow @ 545g (27" only) is most similar to my old 27" Weinmann concaves.

Sorry for the mix-up.
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Old 12-08-17, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Bill in VA View Post

This may help... Bicycle tire pressure calculator I will go higher, but never lower.
At 230 and a 30 lb bike, on 28 mm tires: that site recommends: 200psi, 78/118 and 87. I might do the 87, but those other values of 200 and 118(rear) seem pretty high. Like, 'my pump doesn't reach that psi, and I'm not sure my tires, tubes or rims do either' high. Hell, I think I'm at 55/65 right now. These are, admittedly, tires marketed towards gravel/hardpack-so lower psi than road. But I didn't run my road tires higher than 70-90psi either.

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Old 12-08-17, 08:49 AM
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If you're looking for a very inexpensive yet reliable set up. I been rolling for a little over a year on Vuelta Corsa HD rims (36 spokes w/sealed cartridge bearings), with thorn proof tubes on Nashbar Streetwise Kevlar tires. I run them at 90psi and I'm 230lbs, plus I always have another 20lbs of gear in my pannier bags. Over a years worth of crossing 2 sets of RR tracks, a short ride on cobblestone streets and across a dirt road to get to my office. To date I still have not had a flat or had to true the rims. The came perfectly trued out of the box. Oh.. also.. I've been known to pop a couple of wheelies, stoppies and a bunny hop or two in an attempt to impress my kids. All in total was right at $200.00.
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Old 12-08-17, 02:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Caddywumpus View Post
If you're looking for a very inexpensive yet reliable set up. I been rolling for a little over a year on Vuelta Corsa HD rims (36 spokes w/sealed cartridge bearings), with thorn proof tubes on Nashbar Streetwise Kevlar tires. I run them at 90psi and I'm 230lbs, plus I always have another 20lbs of gear in my pannier bags. Over a years worth of crossing 2 sets of RR tracks, a short ride on cobblestone streets and across a dirt road to get to my office. To date I still have not had a flat or had to true the rims. The came perfectly trued out of the box. Oh.. also.. I've been known to pop a couple of wheelies, stoppies and a bunny hop or two in an attempt to impress my kids. All in total was right at $200.00.




these wheels are great. I use them as well and take EVERYTHING I can throw at them. Super strong, not very light as wheels may go but roll nice and very inexpensive set up. Love mine!
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Old 12-08-17, 06:20 PM
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Bill in VA
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Originally Posted by Sullalto View Post
At 230 and a 30 lb bike, on 28 mm tires: that site recommends: 200psi, 78/118 and 87. I might do the 87, but those other values of 200 and 118(rear) seem pretty high. Like, 'my pump doesn't reach that psi, and I'm not sure my tires, tubes or rims do either' high. Hell, I think I'm at 55/65 right now. These are, admittedly, tires marketed towards gravel/hardpack-so lower psi than road. But I didn't run my road tires higher than 70-90psi either.
I weigh close to you and always give the bike 30 pounds also to be conservative (Butted CroMo steel with bottle, pump and under-seat pack. I generally use the middle calculator (using a 45/55 weight distribution) and compare with the third one (Michelin). I am 230-235. I now use 90-95 on the front and 100-105 on rear on 28mm (-5 on 32mm Compass tires). I use a Silca Impero or a Zedal HFX frame pump and either will go 130 plus easily, but they are long full length pumps that fit from head to seat tube or BB to seat cluster. Minis are just too much work. For home use I use on old Italian Silca Floor pump made of Columbus steel tubing. The Zefal pump is new, the Silcas are vintage from the 1970's and still work perfectly.

If I am on an unimproved road, I will back off to 85/95. Most of my riding is on the paved road, and on the bar flats or brake hoods due to a lower back issue that too much upright aggravates. I also use SPD cleats which allows jumping bad holes, but I tend to watch for rough stuff so I do not have to do that. If pumping inside before a ride in the hot weather I will back off 5 to compensate for heat expansion. It is also why I will let air out if carrying the bike in the car or truck in the summer. A heat expansion blowout in a closed car would not be fun.
Note: all the above pressures are for hook bead rims. On my vintage Peugeot with vintage rims the max is 75.

I think I do the higher pressures because all my flats I have had over years of cycling have been the result of pinch (snakebites) or the old cotton rim tape (blow through at the spoke hole ferrule), and only very rarely a true through the tread or sidewall puncture, even with light tires and UL butyl tubes.
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Old 12-08-17, 09:56 PM
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You guys use much higher pressures than I do. I'm around 284lbs right now and with the 32mm Compass tires @Bill in VA mentioned I use 70psi front and ~90psi in the rear. Compass actually states 90psi as the limit for that tire. Not that you couldn't exceed that, but I just stick with 90 and I'm fine. The rear at 90psi does deflect more than the rule-of-thumb 15%, but I seem to get great performance out of the tire. The front deflects far less at 70 psi, so I see no reason to increase that.

Around 600 miles on this set of tires so far (extralight casing, Vitorria 25-28mm sized latex tubes) and no flats during a ride yet. I did have one pinhole that I had to patch due to me having pinched it a little with a tire lever while installing it the first time. Now that the tires have stretched a little I can pull them off and put them back on with just my thumbs.

I'm astounded at the prices of those Vuelta Corsa HD wheels. Nashbar's got them for $124 for the set right now. I can't use them since I've got discs and thru-axle, but for a suitable bike that's just dirt cheap. I paid more than this whole wheelset costs just for the front hub I'm using in my AeroClyde build. When I think about it, I nearly paid as much for just my spokes!
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Old 12-08-17, 11:18 PM
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Bill in VA
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@SethAZ : I hope you will show use photos of the AeroClyde wheel. I should be interesting.
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Old 12-08-17, 11:37 PM
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Plain and simple THERE IS NO INDESTRUCTIBLE RIM.

There are a number of things one may do to improve wheel life, but keeping rims from denting isn't one of them.

If the tire compresses to where the rim comes into direct contact with a corner like a curb or edge of a pothole it'll dent.

However that points to the solution which lies in using a tire large enough and at sufficient pressure to prevent that direct contact in the first place.
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Old 12-09-17, 01:22 AM
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Originally Posted by SethAZ View Post
I'm astounded at the prices of those Vuelta Corsa HD wheels. Nashbar's got them for $124 for the set right now. I can't use them since I've got discs and thru-axle,
Yeah, if I wasn't planning on a disc/thru axle bike myself, I'd be awfully tempted. As it is, I'm tempted by the $550 powertap wheelset a ton too.

Edit: I'm pretty tempted anyway, in all honesty.

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Old 12-09-17, 09:53 AM
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Rolf Prima "Vigor RS" wheels. Yes they are not inexpensive, but they are light and bomb proof.

I have over 1000 miles on mine, and I weigh in at 350 pounds. I also run Maxxis Padrone tubeless tires.
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Old 12-09-17, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill in VA View Post
@SethAZ : I hope you will show use photos of the AeroClyde wheel. I should be interesting.
I definitely will post some pics. My hubs and spokes arrive on Monday, so Monday night I'll be out in the garage building these. I'm not very experienced so it may take me an evening or two to get them both done, but by midweek or so next week I should have them done and test ridden. I'm very much looking forward to a load of scorn and vitriol to be heaped on them, since my prediction is that everyone will find a reason to either hate or else scoff at the build.
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Old 12-09-17, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Sullalto View Post
Yeah, if I wasn't planning on a disc/thru axle bike myself, I'd be awfully tempted. As it is, I'm tempted by the $550 powertap wheelset a ton too.

Edit: I'm pretty tempted anyway, in all honesty.
Yeah I was tempted by a powertap wheelset previously as well, but now I'm starting to accumulate some funds to get power measurement through one of the other routes. It'll be either crank based or spider based, and I'm leaning toward the Quark DFour. It'll be some months before I can do it, but I see it as an inevitability.
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Old 12-09-17, 08:46 PM
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Originally Posted by SethAZ View Post
I definitely will post some pics. My hubs and spokes arrive on Monday, so Monday night I'll be out in the garage building these. I'm not very experienced so it may take me an evening or two to get them both done, but by midweek or so next week I should have them done and test ridden. I'm very much looking forward to a load of scorn and vitriol to be heaped on them, since my prediction is that everyone will find a reason to either hate or else scoff at the build.

I personally am not an aero fan, but that is because I tend to like a more traditional or retro look of steel tubes and silver components, Plus, I myself am not really at all aero .


That said, a project is a project and worthy of interest and consideration, especially when it makes folks think
and learn. Plus if successful, if could hopefully catch on. While I am a short timer on these boards, this forum seems to be very accepting of folks trying out new ideas, and sharing, given some of the challenges even finding a bike that fits and wheels that last. I wish you a successful build.
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Old 12-09-17, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill in VA View Post
I personally am not an aero fan, but that is because I tend to like a more traditional or retro look of steel tubes and silver components, Plus, I myself am not really at all aero .
I'm not very aero either (around 6'2" @ 284 lbs or so), and I didn't get an aero-framed bike, but I do ride fast enough to appreciate that air resistance soaks up the vast majority of my power output just like it does with thinner riders, so finding a little aero where I can still appeals to me.

That said, a project is a project and worthy of interest and consideration, especially when it makes folks think
and learn. Plus if successful, if could hopefully catch on. While I am a short timer on these boards, this forum seems to be very accepting of folks trying out new ideas, and sharing, given some of the challenges even finding a bike that fits and wheels that last. I wish you a successful build.
Thanks! What got me thinking about this AeroClyde build was that pretty much every aero wheelset I've ever seen was designed for skinny lightweight riders. People buying expensive aero carbon wheelsets are always looking for low spoke count, the lightest weight components, etc. On the other hand, "clydesdale" wheelsets typically are build more like tanks, with a focus on really heavy rims, high spoke counts with beefy spokes, etc. with seemingly no regard at all for things like aerodynamics.

So I wanted to see what would happen if I tried to combine a wide, moderately deep yet lightweight and strong rim that would work very well with wide tires (like the 32mm Compass tires I'm using) and be about as aero as possible for the size, with a high spoke count using tough spokes that are strong where it actually counts, aero if possible, and yet not be thicker and heavier than needed. Thus CX-Sprint spokes up front, and Sapim Force spokes in the rear. The CX-Sprint is the slightly thicker and tougher step-sister to the popular CX-Ray, for aero combined with strength, and the Sapim Force enjoys the same 1.8mm middle section of typical double-butted spokes, but is triple butted, with the hub end being 2.18mm for better toughness and durability.

My hope is that this will represent a very nice wheelset that salvages as much nice shape, tire support, and aero design as is reasonably obtainable in a build that is tough enough for hard riding by a superclyde like me.

The weight weenies will point out that these are much heavier than high-dollar aero wheels for light cyclists.
The aero freaks will point out that the high spoke count negates some of whatever aero benefit one hopes to gain.
The clydes will point out that they bought a clyde build from brand X for hundreds of dollars less than I paid for my components and they've got thousands of miles on them with no problem, and that since we clydes are all fat we just need toughness and durability and trying to get some aero benefit is a waste of time or money. Or else they'll point out that I could have used the heavy and tough high-spoke hubs and rims that the touring cyclists or tandems use and had an even stronger build. There's truly something to hate about this build for everyone!
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