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Best Road Bike wheels for 300lbs Rider

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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Best Road Bike wheels for 300lbs Rider

Old 12-11-17, 09:20 AM
  #1  
blueboozer
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Looking for Best Road Bike wheels for 300lbs Rider

I am new to the Forum and looking for some direction. I have been riding a Hybrid Trek FX3 Disc. I have broken a few spokes and am looking to upgrade to a road bike.

I am looking at buying a Synapse Carbon Disc Ultegra but am concerned with the wheels holding up do to my size. Any suggestions on good wheels that can hold 300lbs?

Thanks!

Last edited by blueboozer; 12-11-17 at 12:46 PM.
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Old 12-11-17, 01:18 PM
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Go to a wheel builder.
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Old 12-11-17, 01:42 PM
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You can order some of these with 36 spokes in front 40 in rear and are rated for 300 lb rider.

Velocity Wheels - Hand Made in USA

There are various rims for various tire widths.
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Old 12-11-17, 01:51 PM
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What he said.

If I looked this up right, the Mavic Aksum WTS disc wheels that come stock on that bike are 20 spokes both front and rear. That would be a bad idea for a guy your size.

For a guy your weight (just a little over my size - I was 284 this morning) keep in mind that more spokes is better within reason, and that the general trend in wheel marketing for many years now has been fewer and fewer spokes. So most of the commonly marketed wheelsets isn't really beefy in the way a really big guy wants/needs it to be.

Spokes is one thing, but there are so many variables that either extensive reading online, or a good conversation with a wheel builder, can give you better info. If you could find the ultra lightest rims in a drilling for enough spokes, for instance, it still might not be a good idea to use it. Really you want a durable rim, enough durable spokes, a durable hub, etc. in an appropriate combination.

For my own riding I've been on some 32/32 wheels I built several years ago. They have a few thousand miles on them and have been fine. My new bike also has 32/32 wheels (Stans No Tubes Grail ZTR wheelset), and I feel totally confident in those wheels. That said, I'm currently building what I hope is an ultimate wheelset for a very heavy rider who nevertheless wants some really nice wheels. I went with 36 spokes both front and rear. This was a conscious decision, as my mind kept wrestling with the temptation to go lower than 32/32 because I could probably get away with it. I don't want to be riding wheels that I think I can get away with, so I consciously turned away from that temptation and added some spokes instead. Kind of an "eff you!" to the temptations of Satan's low-spoke devils whispering in my ear.
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Old 12-11-17, 02:35 PM
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Thanks for the info. I have heard of Velocity but was told the hubs are not great. I will dig into this more. Appreciate the input.
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Old 12-12-17, 06:26 AM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by blueboozer View Post
I am new to the Forum and looking for some direction. I have been riding a Hybrid Trek FX3 Disc. I have broken a few spokes and am looking to upgrade to a road bike.

I am looking at buying a Synapse Carbon Disc Ultegra but am concerned with the wheels holding up do to my size. Any suggestions on good wheels that can hold 300lbs?

Thanks!
I never worry about popping spokes any longer after switching to a wheel with 12-gauge spokes vs the normal 14-gauge. Plus they are cheap, much cheaper than many other "high-quality" rims and I'm not dependent on a superb wheel builder. https://www.amazon.com/Wheel-Master-.../dp/B006FCHTZQ

BTW, I use to always pop spokes, but since getting this rim, I've got (so far) over 6,000 miles on it and not a single popped spoke, even after getting a wrench stuck in the spokes while riding, which only bent one spoke.
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Old 12-15-17, 12:27 PM
  #7  
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Boozer - smart of you to ask for input on wheels for clydes, and the advice above is solid. Seth in particular knows his stuff when it comes to wheels and I absolutely agree with his recommendation to go no lower than 32 spokes per wheel.

Thinking broader, make sure you ask the same capability question of the rest of the bike. The Synapse Carbon Disc is an awesome bike but appears to be rated at 275 lbs for the rider and 285 lbs for rider+cargo. See page 53 of Cannondale owner's manual: Mountain Bikes, Road Bikes, E-Bikes - Cannondale Bicycles

I've found that a lot of the full carbon bikes have similar or even lesser load restrictions. Specialized introduced the Roubaix with Future Shock technology and it's been a big hit but behind the scenes they have quietly lowered to the max weight recommendation from 275 lbs (for most models) to 240 lbs for all Roubaix models 2018 and forward. You'll need to do a fair amount of digging to find max weight recommendations on bikes; manufacturers tend to bury that info in the manuals and not advertise it. There is a lot of debate out there about clydes on carbon frames; certainly it's better than being on a very cheap store-bought aluminum frame but on the other end a clyde may feel harshness to a carbon frame that a lighter rider would not.

IMHO, spending $3k for full carbon on your first road bike may not be the best move. Even though your FX3 is a nice solid bike, you're going to go through a learning & growth curve with any decent road bike and a year from now you'll be a different rider. You may be better off sticking with a metal frame (alum or steel) and spending the money on upgraded components like groupset (105 or above), wheelsets like described above, disc brakes with at least 160mm rotors, upgraded tires, etc. You'll get a great bike that will serve you well as you grow & learn and you won't have to worry about nicking up a carbon frame. After a couple of years of riding a road bike you'll have a better idea of what works for you and then you can go carbon, steel, titanium, etc. The alloy version of that Synapse (with carbon fork, 105 groupset, etc) is about $1400 less; you could do a lot with that difference.

As I tell the other clydes in my riding group, if I was that concerned about the weight difference between a carbon frame and a good alloy frame, the smartest thing I could do is skip lunch before riding.
Good luck bike hunting!
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Old 12-15-17, 01:03 PM
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Originally Posted by cj19 View Post
Boozer - smart of you to ask for input on wheels for clydes, and the advice above is solid. Seth in particular knows his stuff when it comes to wheels and I absolutely agree with his recommendation to go no lower than 32 spokes per wheel.
I'd love the compliment if that were true, but just for the record, I'm no expert on any of this. I've ridden a lot, I weigh a lot, and I've read a lot. I've built a couple of wheelsets including the AeroClyde wheels I just posted about in the road cycling sub. This just means I aspire to know my stuff, not that I actually do. I would regard anything I say on the matter as interested and moderately informed opinion at best. Thanks, though!

Thinking broader, make sure you ask the same capability question of the rest of the bike. The Synapse Carbon Disc is an awesome bike but appears to be rated at 275 lbs for the rider and 285 lbs for rider+cargo. See page 53 of Cannondale owner's manual: Mountain Bikes, Road Bikes, E-Bikes - Cannondale Bicycles

I've found that a lot of the full carbon bikes have similar or even lesser load restrictions. Specialized introduced the Roubaix with Future Shock technology and it's been a big hit but behind the scenes they have quietly lowered to the max weight recommendation from 275 lbs (for most models) to 240 lbs for all Roubaix models 2018 and forward. You'll need to do a fair amount of digging to find max weight recommendations on bikes; manufacturers tend to bury that info in the manuals and not advertise it. There is a lot of debate out there about clydes on carbon frames; certainly it's better than being on a very cheap store-bought aluminum frame but on the other end a clyde may feel harshness to a carbon frame that a lighter rider would not.

IMHO, spending $3k for full carbon on your first road bike may not be the best move. Even though your FX3 is a nice solid bike, you're going to go through a learning & growth curve with any decent road bike and a year from now you'll be a different rider. You may be better off sticking with a metal frame (alum or steel) and spending the money on upgraded components like groupset (105 or above), wheelsets like described above, disc brakes with at least 160mm rotors, upgraded tires, etc. You'll get a great bike that will serve you well as you grow & learn and you won't have to worry about nicking up a carbon frame. After a couple of years of riding a road bike you'll have a better idea of what works for you and then you can go carbon, steel, titanium, etc. The alloy version of that Synapse (with carbon fork, 105 groupset, etc) is about $1400 less; you could do a lot with that difference.

As I tell the other clydes in my riding group, if I was that concerned about the weight difference between a carbon frame and a good alloy frame, the smartest thing I could do is skip lunch before riding.
Good luck bike hunting!
I pretty much agree with all of this. I would add that if one does choose to ride a bike that has a lower advertised weight limit than what they see on the scale each morning, at the very least run the largest tires they can fit on it at reasonably low pressures. Not only will it be more comfortable and probably at least as performant, but anything they can do to reduce vibration and shocks to the frame from running over bumps, potholes, etc. can reduce the likelihood of the bike failing due to weight. Things like learning how to "ride light" are just as important. Riding over train tracks or potholes with one's weight firmly planted on one's saddle can be a recipe for broken bikes or wheels, where just shifting one's weight to one's bent legs (getting off the saddle even just a little) can radically reduce the shock and potential damage.

One anecdote: when I bought my used Trek 2300 off Craigslist to transition to a real road bike from the 29er hardtail I'd been riding up until that point, it came with its original lightweight Bontrager wheels with low spoke counts. I rode around on them for several hundred miles and didn't think anything of it. Then during one ride I road fast over some train tracks and didn't unweight my saddle in time and literally pulled spokes right through the flange on the rear hub, instantly hobbling the bike. Fortunately I didn't also crash. That started a lot of my reading about wheels, spokes, what makes for a decent build for heavy people, etc. Any decent wheel builder who has dealt very much with clydesdales will know more about all of this than I do, but since my attempts at informing myself and building my own wheels I've done fairly well for my own purposes.
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Old 12-31-17, 12:26 AM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by blueboozer View Post
I am new to the Forum and looking for some direction. I have been riding a Hybrid Trek FX3 Disc. I have broken a few spokes and am looking to upgrade to a road bike.

I am looking at buying a Synapse Carbon Disc Ultegra but am concerned with the wheels holding up do to my size. Any suggestions on good wheels that can hold 300lbs?

Thanks!
[IMG][/IMG]

https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Produc...2_603921_-1___

If breaking spokes or fighting to keep wheels in true have ever been an issue with your road wheels then the Vuelta Corsa HD 11-Speed Road Wheelset are definitely the right choice. Everything about them oozes strength and confidence so they're perfect for heavy training, the rigors of cyclocross, touring or commuting, or if you're simply a bigger rider who puts plenty of stress on wheels through normal riding. They've got a stout, 30mm-deep aluminum rim that's built to last plus you couldn't ask for a stronger spoke set-up than 36 straight gauge spokes per wheel laced in a 3-cross pattern.

The CNC-machined brake track provides excellent all-weather performance while the hubs spin on sealed cartridge bearings so they get up to speed quickly and roll smoothly. For the ultimate in compatibility this wheelset is 11-speed Shimano/SRAM ready, with an included 8/9/10-speed spacer for older cassettes so the odds are it will seamlessly work with your current drivetrain. Last but not least, there's no robot construction here as these wheels are lovingly built by hand for perfect tension and true.
30mm, medium-V alloy, pinned rims are strong and aerodynamic
CNC-machined brake walls provide responsive, precise braking performance
36 14-gauge stainless spokes laced 3x (both front and rear) creates a super-strong wheel
Sealed cartridge bearings spin fast and roll smooth
Robust design accommodates riders weighing up to 300 lbs
Hand built to ensure perfect tension and true
Shimano/SRAM 8/9/10/11-speed compatible cassette body
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Old 01-04-18, 03:54 PM
  #10  
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Have some coursa’s upstairs.
Never made me walk.

Busted a couple spokes but got home (cantilever brakes).
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Old 01-07-18, 08:53 AM
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Awesome!...but...he needs disc wheels.
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Old 01-07-18, 08:54 AM
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I’d say custom and/or Velocity.
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Old 01-07-18, 09:31 AM
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if he needs disk go custom or I have some DT Swiss on my cross bike that are very good too. never had an issue with them and I was 330lbs on them...... was.....
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Old 01-11-18, 12:00 AM
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+1 on the Velocity wheels
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Old 05-26-18, 04:21 PM
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Wheels/Bikes for heavy riders

I'm 300lbs and I rode the same Specialized Roubaix for 7000 miles until I was hit by a car a couple months ago and the frame was too damaged to repair. I also rode Mavic Ksyrium SLS wheels for three years but while light and nice to ride, they weren't robust. I've since been riding HED Ardennes Plus wheels and a really nice set of Williams 31 wheels (28/32). Neither the frame nor the wheels is rated for someone my size, but I've never had a problem. I think weight limits are for manufacturer liability more than anything and often on the conservative, low end of what's safe to ride. I'm currently riding a 91 Moser Leader AX with Mavic Open 23mm rims and I've not had any problem with that frame or wheels either.
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Old 05-27-18, 01:52 PM
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32 or 36 spoke count wheels will work for you. I used to ride 32 spoke count (being very mindful to not go over bumps) at my 360 pounds. I upgraded to Rolf Prima "Vigor RS" (OEM) wheels which are 24 spoke front and back, but the spokes are indexed differently than a standard wheel. I put 1000 miles on the Rolf wheels before having to have them trued.

The upside to the Rolf wheels is their low weight and durability, the downside is the cost.
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Old 05-27-18, 11:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Rovinato View Post
I'm 300lbs and I rode the same Specialized Roubaix for 7000 miles until I was hit by a car a couple months ago and the frame was too damaged to repair. I also rode Mavic Ksyrium SLS wheels for three years but while light and nice to ride, they weren't robust. I've since been riding HED Ardennes Plus wheels and a really nice set of Williams 31 wheels (28/32). Neither the frame nor the wheels is rated for someone my size, but I've never had a problem. I think weight limits are for manufacturer liability more than anything and often on the conservative, low end of what's safe to ride. I'm currently riding a 91 Moser Leader AX with Mavic Open 23mm rims and I've not had any problem with that frame or wheels either.
r u ok?
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Old 06-04-18, 07:16 AM
  #18  
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Everything is good as of now on the rims that came on the bike. I had them trued once in the first 250 miles but since have been right. I figure if the Mavic Aksium Disc fail I will look at getting custom rims, hubs, spokes as for now these rims are awesome!

I appreciate all the feedback on this forum! Let the Clydesdales Glide!
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Old 06-09-18, 11:31 AM
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More comments.

I currently weigh 232 pounds and have ridden over 7000 miles each of the last 6 years. I ride all the local climbs in northern Colorado many of which include short segments over 15% grade. My 2012 Fugi Gran Fondo has over 36000 miles and the frame is still going strong. I am on the third crankset (spiral fracture of spindle strarts at pinch bolt) fourth rear wheel (rim crack of drive side spokes) and second front wheel. Spokes break when the spoke tension is too low and goes to zero as your weight and pot holes / bumps in road flex the wheel. Rims crack when the spoke tension is too high as your weight, drive forces and pot holes / bumps put extra tension on the rim. Higher spoke tension and heavier aero shaped wheels and higher spoke count all contribute to reduced spoke breakage. I have a 1997 mavic 32 spoke cxp 30 wheel set that currently has over 50000 miles and remains true with no broken spokes or spoke adjustments ever. Higher spoke count, heavier aero shaped wheels, spoke eyelets, and lower spoke tension reduce rim cracking. The vast majority of wheels sold with bikes and after market wheel sets are not suitable for long mileage training use by heavier riders on rough mountain roads. Custom order 32 or 36 spoke aero shaped wheels if you want to stop having wheel failures.
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Old 06-17-18, 07:04 AM
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You could also look at bontrager,there is no weight restrictions on those carbon rims.
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Old 06-18-18, 11:04 AM
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I'm currently 275. I love my Mavic Kysrium Elites. These are the ones with the steel spokes versus the SL's which have aluminum spokes. Always true, rarely a flat. My internal bushings wore out after several thousand miles, then they had a death rattle. This was easily fixed with a bearing replacement from Hub Doctor, self installed. Great wheels.
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Old 06-25-18, 03:02 AM
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Guys i think is post has been

Fully responded to. Lol
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Old 06-26-18, 01:38 PM
  #23  
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velomine 32 h, 105 level hubs, H + Son rims $200 H Plus Son Archetype Shimano RS505 Road Disc Brake Hubs Wheelset [740813] - $200.00 Velomine.com : Worldwide Bicycle Shop, fixed gear track bike wheelsets campagnolo super record vintage bike
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Old 06-29-18, 10:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Big Dave Crowe View Post
[IMG]

https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Produc...2_603921_-1___

If breaking spokes or fighting to keep wheels in true have ever been an issue with your road wheels then the Vuelta Corsa HD 11-Speed Road Wheelset are definitely the right choice. Everything about them oozes strength and confidence so they're perfect for heavy training, the rigors of cyclocross, touring or commuting, or if you're simply a bigger rider who puts plenty of stress on wheels through normal riding. They've got a stout, 30mm-deep aluminum rim that's built to last plus you couldn't ask for a stronger spoke set-up than 36 straight gauge spokes per wheel laced in a 3-cross pattern.

The CNC-machined brake track provides excellent all-weather performance while the hubs spin on sealed cartridge bearings so they get up to speed quickly and roll smoothly. For the ultimate in compatibility this wheelset is 11-speed Shimano/SRAM ready, with an included 8/9/10-speed spacer for older cassettes so the odds are it will seamlessly work with your current drivetrain. Last but not least, there's no robot construction here as these wheels are lovingly built by hand for perfect tension and true.
30mm, medium-V alloy, pinned rims are strong and aerodynamic
CNC-machined brake walls provide responsive, precise braking performance
36 14-gauge stainless spokes laced 3x (both front and rear) creates a super-strong wheel
Sealed cartridge bearings spin fast and roll smooth
Robust design accommodates riders weighing up to 300 lbs
Hand built to ensure perfect tension and true
Shimano/SRAM 8/9/10/11-speed compatible cassette body
I bought these after having breaking 3 spokes on my Bontrager back wheels and I have to say these were a great recommendation. I bought them on sale @nashbar for just over a $100.
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Old 06-29-18, 11:22 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Stravacyclist79 View Post
I bought these after having breaking 3 spokes on my Bontrager back wheels and I have to say these were a great recommendation. I bought them on sale @nashbar for just over a $100.
But still not disc brakes like the OP needs.
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