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Oh god, not another bike suggestion thread

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Oh god, not another bike suggestion thread

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Old 05-16-18, 05:03 PM
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Xaekai
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Oh god, not another bike suggestion thread

Hello there BikeForums. I'm sure you've seen many of these threads before. I've gone back and read quite a few but didn't find what I was really looking for.

I'm 6'3" and weigh 380lbs, I have ever-so-slightly short legs for my height. I'm looking for a MTB or hybrid (adventure?) bike. I'd prefer something with disc brakes and at least one shock/suspension. Money really isn't an object but I'd like to keep it under 1600 if possible. I live in Portland OR and there is quite a few decent paved bike trails here. But I'd also like to ride the Alpine Trail near Oakridge OR, so I need something meaty. The last bike I had years ago was a Raleigh Mojave 8.0 and I was really fond of it but then someone stole it and I haven't had a bike since.

Any suggestions or insights would be most appreciated and welcomed. I've been looking over BikesDirect available stock after having seen them mentioned several times in other threads of this nature, but I really don't know what to look for in a bike to support someone my size other than a 20-22" frame.
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Old 05-16-18, 05:34 PM
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As most of the other responses to the "oh god, not another bike suggestion thread" will suggest, find a used specialized rock hopper (hard tail, no shock) MTB from the 90s, or equivalent or find one of those Trek hybrids, I forget the nomenclature. FX? A gravel bike might be a good option, again with aftermarket wheels.

1600 is a pretty healthy budget - you might be best served with a lightly used bike (no shocks!) and some hand built wheels to hold you off the ground.
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Old 05-16-18, 05:55 PM
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Is something with some sort of suspension just completely out of the question for my weight? The Raleigh Mojave I once owned had a full suspension and seemed to handle me alright and I was 320 back then. I'd prefer to avoid having to delve through used bike ads if possible, but if it's necessary I'll do it. Is there something better than eBay and Craigslist for that?
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Old 05-16-18, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Xaekai View Post
Is something with some sort of suspension just completely out of the question for my weight? The Raleigh Mojave I once owned had a full suspension and seemed to handle me alright and I was 320 back then. I'd prefer to avoid having to delve through used bike ads if possible, but if it's necessary I'll do it. Is there something better than eBay and Craigslist for that?
For Portland specifically, Sellwood Cycles and Community Cycling Center both sell used bikes. Additionally River City Bikes has an outlet store about a block away from their main store.
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Old 05-16-18, 09:06 PM
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1600 is a healthy starting point but I too would suggest a nice mtb without shocks is a good idea but certainly not nessasary. I would find a friendly bike shop and talk to them. They will point you in the right direction and test rice a couple too that is important. You can do well at 500-800 for your wants/needs. Maybe save the big budget for bike #2......it will happen. N+1 bites us all
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Old 05-16-18, 11:52 PM
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most suspension part are rated to 300#, even the upper end air forks. I'm digging pus size tires, 2.8-3" range. You can run lower pressure and feels like a bit of air suspension or a floating cloud on deeper sand. Your old MTB likely had coil and oil fork.

If you find the suspension forks not working, you can swap them out for steel rigid for $150 or less, drop weight and install the suspension fork later. Keep in mind the Axle to Crown dimension when selecting forks as it will mess with bike frame geometries head/seat angles.

29plus tires
https://surlybikes.com/bikes/krampus/bike_specs

There should be TONS of shops in portland that can help/test ride/fit bikes for you.

I have this one in R+ build in 275plus tires, but there is a cheaper D+ one that might work for you. The SRAM fork says 120+psi for 200# rider, with max PSI of 205psi
https://www.santacruzbicycles.com/en-US/chameleon

fork manual https://sram-cdn-pull-zone-gsdesign....lish_rev_d.pdf

You will have some problems with the wheels at some point, not sure if more spoke options are out there with boosted hubs, never dug around to see,
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Old 05-17-18, 12:23 AM
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I would really recommend giving the Specialized Diverge a look. It is considered a Cross/gravel bike, so while it won't go stump jumping, it handles singletrack really well.

The fat tires and a shock built into the upper stem make a huge difference in ride quality.

With the shock where it is, it is not supporting your full weight, just what you put onto the handlebars. That makes our weight less of an issue compared to full/fork suspension.

I did a full writeup after riding one for a couple of days, it should still be on the front page of this sub-forum.

They have hidden rack hardpoints and also come in big frame sizes, up to 64cm.
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Old 05-17-18, 11:47 AM
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As far as the suspension goes, if you are that heavy I would avoid used bikes with suspension they tend to get more frail with age and your weight could kill them. For a new bike you are probably OK as long as you use it for around town kind of riding. Obviously if you do real mountain biking you will kill the suspension at 380 pounds, and the wheels too. You can kill the suspension at 220 pounds in short order if you are aggressive enough rider doing lots of jumps.

Worst case you can usually lock out the suspension so if your rear suspension is bottoming out you can just force it to lock in place. Front suspension should not be a problem.
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Old 05-20-18, 02:12 PM
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Thank you for all the thoughts guys. Based on your feedback I'm looking at a Merida Big Nine 40-D. It's hardtail with a suspension fork that can be locked out so I don't destroy them on singletrack. Are they a reputable brand of bikes?
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Old 05-20-18, 03:40 PM
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Merida is one of the three supersized bike conglomerates so yeah, although they usually manufacture for other brands. I don't think I've ever seen a Merida bike in the USA, but go for it.
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