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Gravel Bike for 270 lbs, 5'10"?

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Old 09-01-18, 11:12 PM
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Nikon Fan
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Gravel Bike for 270 lbs, 5'10"?

Several months ago I purchased a Fuji Tread 1.3 Disk for commuting on rough asphault roads. Due to daily rain and a recent road trip, I was unable ride, so I haven't given it a proprer test.

Does anyone know the maximim weight it will support?
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Old 09-02-18, 12:38 AM
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CliffordK
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You can ask your local bike shop. Performance?

But, everything indicates that class of bikes should be able to handle 270 lbs... just be a bit careful of what you're running over.

I see it comes stock with 32mm tires and 32 spoke wheels which should be fine. You could look at your clearances for potentially wider tires in the future, but I'd ride what you have for now.

Likewise, if you do develop problems with the wheels (rear?), then replace at that time with a good 36 spoke wheel.

Keep in mind that a good cross bike is designed with some redundancy for rough roads and trails. If you ride on pavement, it should be easier on the bike.
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Old 09-02-18, 07:29 PM
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I was finally able to ride it today (only 5 miles due to lack of time). Nice ride! Hands were numb though, probably need to raise the stem a bit.

I checked on the Fuji website, but there was no mention of the weight tolerances. My concern is that if I hit a rough patch of road or some bump, the added pressure could damage either the carbon fiber fork, aluminum frame or the thin rims. My assumption when I purchased it at my lbs was that it was designed for both dirt trails and flat roads, therefore it could be tough enough to support my weight over the occasional rough road. I do all of my riding on paved streets and paved bike paths, but not all of the streets/bike paths in my city are smooth.

My ultimate goal is to ride 20 miles per day, at least 5 days a week.
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Old 09-03-18, 11:26 AM
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The weak spot, if any, is going to be the wheels.

That said, they are 32H and they look pretty stout. If you are not jumping curves or hitting potholes you should be fine.

They come with 32c wide tires, reports say it will take up to 40c, which would make for an even more plush ride and reduce the strain on the wheels.
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Old 09-03-18, 03:09 PM
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Ride more and worry less. You aren't going to damage the frame or fork at your weight. You may eventually have wheel problems, but don't worry about it and get out and ride. Deal with it if/when it happens
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Old 09-04-18, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Nikon Fan View Post
I was finally able to ride it today (only 5 miles due to lack of time). Nice ride! Hands were numb though, probably need to raise the stem a bit.

I checked on the Fuji website, but there was no mention of the weight tolerances. My concern is that if I hit a rough patch of road or some bump, the added pressure could damage either the carbon fiber fork, aluminum frame or the thin rims. My assumption when I purchased it at my lbs was that it was designed for both dirt trails and flat roads, therefore it could be tough enough to support my weight over the occasional rough road. I do all of my riding on paved streets and paved bike paths, but not all of the streets/bike paths in my city are smooth.

My ultimate goal is to ride 20 miles per day, at least 5 days a week.
i started at 270# 6í1Ē. Iím in a Giant Anyroad comax. Hands going numb it could be position, but for me I put on some gloves and it took care of that issue. Donít worry about something breaking, just donít go jumping it or hitting those big pot holes if you can avoid it.

Im down to 240 now and have around 500 miles on my bike. Everything on it is still good, I had to do its first tune up a little while ago for the chain stretching but thatís just normal stuff anyways.

These bikes can surprisingly handle quite a bit. Donít worry about the frame there is videos of shops trying to break their frames and it takes A LOT of force. But as stated the wheels is the weak spot but you should be good. Usual weight limits are around 300# but even that there is margin for error and only there to keep the lawyers happy. So a bike with a 300# limit, Iím sure really is good for 350.
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Old 10-09-18, 09:58 AM
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About weight restrictions on bikes, i wonder alot if aluminum should have weight limits added to them. Reason being is i work with aluminum skins on airplanes for a living. The pieces are average 8 to ten feet wide and up to 30 feet long. All it takes is a scratch over 15 thousands of a inch deep into the metal no mater how long it is and the skin scrap (5,000 to 15,000 dollars a skin) TRASH.... No mater what shape it is a hairline scratch, a nick or a gouge will rapidly turn to a crack. So makes ya think on aluminum bikes
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Old 10-09-18, 10:36 AM
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5yr warranty on Fuji frames to the original owner. Ride it and upgrade the wheels and tires as needed. AKA stronger and tubeless ready wheelset

is this your bike? https://archive.fujibikes.com/2017/Fuji/tread-13
no clue if the rims are tubeless ready from that brand. Being Tubeless will allow you to explore the larger 38c to 42c tires that may clear that frame.
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Old 10-11-18, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by tclong03 View Post
About weight restrictions on bikes, i wonder alot if aluminum should have weight limits added to them. Reason being is i work with aluminum skins on airplanes for a living. The pieces are average 8 to ten feet wide and up to 30 feet long. All it takes is a scratch over 15 thousands of a inch deep into the metal no mater how long it is and the skin scrap (5,000 to 15,000 dollars a skin) TRASH.... No mater what shape it is a hairline scratch, a nick or a gouge will rapidly turn to a crack. So makes ya think on aluminum bikes
Your concerns are unwarranted. In the Western World, the number of aluminum bikes sold has dwarfed that of all other materials for almost twenty years, and there is no epidemic of broken frames. In fact, since steel became less common, broken frames have become less common. Bicycle frames are generally mass produced quite cheaply and have a very wide margin of safety built in. Your experience in the aircraft industry does not translate to bicycles.
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Old 10-11-18, 11:10 AM
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there is a slight pressure and temp difference from ground level to say 20-30k ft into the atmosphere.

Most lawyers will tag the frames with 280 or 300 pound limits. But there are many that ride north and still get warranty for being north of the limits. Alum is good, wheels will be the challenge.
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Old 10-11-18, 08:02 PM
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I test road that bike at Performance Bikes when I was 300lbs. Was told that it would have no problem holding my weight, even the wheels. I'm sure your not going to have a problem, unless you hit too many bad roads.....By the way, that's a nice bike!
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Old 10-12-18, 10:42 AM
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