Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
Reload this Page >

F/S Steel or Ti MTB for 335lb, 6'2"????

Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

F/S Steel or Ti MTB for 335lb, 6'2"????

Old 04-25-20, 06:09 PM
  #1  
dcgriggs79
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
F/S Steel or Ti MTB for 335lb, 6'2"????

Hey all, I just joined. I have been perusing these forums but I haven't found a good answer. I don't have a lot of biking buddies, so I could really use some guidance!
  • As title says, I'm 335 and 6'2". I'm 40 years old.
  • I ride primarily multi-use and non-technical single track
  • I don't really have a budget limit. I want to be reasonable, but will spend what it takes to get what I need
  • I ride primarily multi-use and non-technical single track
  • Here's an important point: I had a massive spinal injury years ago and had fusion surgery. My right ankle is paralyzed as a result and I cannot stand on pedals except for brief, flat surface coasting.
  • Current bike is a Trek X-Caliber 7 hardtail (2015 model). The components are taking a beating but the 29er wheels have held up surprisingly well
  • I coast down some pretty fast downhills with berms that are big enough that I have to brake so I don't go airborne
  • First and foremost, since I'm over the bike's weight rating, I'm absolutely terrified the head tube is going to break and I will bite the dust. At my weight, with my prior back injury, I feel like that could result in severe injury
  • Secondly, I'm taking a pounding via the seat constantly since I can't stand.
  • As a result of the last two points, I'm thinking I want a steel or Ti full suspension frame, 29er
  • I don't want a fat tire, or even 29er+. I do think I'd like something that accommodates up to 2.6"-2.8" tires though
  • Bikes I'm finding that fit this description like the Litespeed Unicoi don't specify weight ratings. They're expensive - not prohibitively - but more than I probably should spend considering I'm just a weekend rider and don't race.
  • A buddy is telling me that weld joints on steel and Ti are also susceptible to breaking and that I'm worrying too much
  • He's telling me a standard frame like I have now (rated 300lbs) is fine, and that I should instead look at upgrading wheels, shocks, etc.
  • Other bikes that are specifically built for big-uns (like Zize) are horribly unattractive to me and most don't have the F/S or even front shocks.
  • One last thing -- I'm losing weight. But realistically, I don't think I'll ever get below about 275. I'm just built really heavy.
So I'm kind of at a loss for what to do. Maybe buy a steel frame and then buy heavy duty components for a self/custom build? I feel like others have trod this path before, so I'm interested in hearing anyone's thoughts or experiences about where I should/could go from here. Much appreciated!

Chris
dcgriggs79 is offline  
Old 04-27-20, 04:45 PM
  #2  
wsteve464
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 551
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 155 Post(s)
Liked 67 Times in 58 Posts
Have you looked into a carbon fiber frame? They are surprisingly strong and maybe increase the spring strength on the shocks

https://reviews.mtbr.com/carbon-fram...hich-is-better.
wsteve464 is offline  
Old 04-27-20, 07:56 PM
  #3  
zjrog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,595

Bikes: 1986 KHS Fiero, 1989 Trek 950, 1990 Trek 7000, 1991 Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo, 1992 Trek 1400, 1997 Cannondale CAD2 R300, 1998 Cannondale CAD2 R200, 2002 Marin San Rafael, 2006 Cannondale CAAD8 R1000, 2010 Performance Access XCL9R

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 260 Post(s)
Liked 196 Times in 141 Posts
Originally Posted by dcgriggs79 View Post
Hey all, I just joined. I have been perusing these forums but I haven't found a good answer. I don't have a lot of biking buddies, so I could really use some guidance!
  • As title says, I'm 335 and 6'2". I'm 40 years old.
  • I ride primarily multi-use and non-technical single track
  • I don't really have a budget limit. I want to be reasonable, but will spend what it takes to get what I need
  • I ride primarily multi-use and non-technical single track
  • Here's an important point: I had a massive spinal injury years ago and had fusion surgery. My right ankle is paralyzed as a result and I cannot stand on pedals except for brief, flat surface coasting.
  • Current bike is a Trek X-Caliber 7 hardtail (2015 model). The components are taking a beating but the 29er wheels have held up surprisingly well
  • I coast down some pretty fast downhills with berms that are big enough that I have to brake so I don't go airborne
  • First and foremost, since I'm over the bike's weight rating, I'm absolutely terrified the head tube is going to break and I will bite the dust. At my weight, with my prior back injury, I feel like that could result in severe injury
  • Secondly, I'm taking a pounding via the seat constantly since I can't stand.
  • As a result of the last two points, I'm thinking I want a steel or Ti full suspension frame, 29er
  • I don't want a fat tire, or even 29er+. I do think I'd like something that accommodates up to 2.6"-2.8" tires though
  • Bikes I'm finding that fit this description like the Litespeed Unicoi don't specify weight ratings. They're expensive - not prohibitively - but more than I probably should spend considering I'm just a weekend rider and don't race.
  • A buddy is telling me that weld joints on steel and Ti are also susceptible to breaking and that I'm worrying too much
  • He's telling me a standard frame like I have now (rated 300lbs) is fine, and that I should instead look at upgrading wheels, shocks, etc.
  • Other bikes that are specifically built for big-uns (like Zize) are horribly unattractive to me and most don't have the F/S or even front shocks.
  • One last thing -- I'm losing weight. But realistically, I don't think I'll ever get below about 275. I'm just built really heavy.
So I'm kind of at a loss for what to do. Maybe buy a steel frame and then buy heavy duty components for a self/custom build? I feel like others have trod this path before, so I'm interested in hearing anyone's thoughts or experiences about where I should/could go from here. Much appreciated!

Chris
Brother! I'm 57, was 378 at my heaviest. My 29er was all I dared ride outdoors for a long time. I suffered a T9 Spinal burst fracture nearly 9 years ago. Fused T7-12... Trust me, I know EXACTLY how this matters. I had gastric sleeve stomach surgery 18 months ago, and am in the 240s now. I've been on my old steel roadbike from 320 on down, and under 250, I rewarded myself with a 18 pound Cannondale roadbike. I can shave some weight off it later with some lighter wheels if I want to. (The Cannondale I wrecked on was repaired and serves permanent trainer duties...)

OK. Unless your pockets are deep, Titanium is certainly out of MY reach, but would support you. Good quality old steel bikes are plentiful, and upgrade readily. My 1986 KHS roadbike is a 60cm frame and I updated it with Shimano 105 5600 series 10 speed stuff. It's still 25 pounds, but rides NICE. Still. Good wheels are always a good upgrade. I have 32 spoke wheels on everything, but my 29er, it's on 28s (bike is as I got it from a friend when I needed it most!).

I DO NOT, ride technical trails. I do not do fast or steep descents. That is a fear I can't beat yet from my wreck, which I have no memory of... I do ride from time to time, with fat guys. They go slow when I need to, and I appreciate that. But I can do 20+ for a while and can reach 30+, but I pay dearly for it. Otherwise, I'm an average 16 mph guy usually. I have nothing to prove.
zjrog is offline  
Old 04-27-20, 08:06 PM
  #4  
brawlo
Senior Member
 
brawlo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,107
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 254 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 22 Posts
I think you have a 2 fold problem here which will seriously hamper your efforts. First is your weight. Even with dropping weight you are at or over the designed weight limit of most if not all bikes. Second is your riding style. Not being able to get out of the saddle means you are stressing any frame (specifically the rear) in ways that it wasn't really designed to be stressed. Bearing that in mind I think you should be touching base with as many bike companies as possible and seeing what becomes of it. Contact them with your issues and see who gives enough of a damn about your situation to at least get back to you, and even provide you with some guidance or, better still, a solution to your problem. Talk to full custom builders too.

Outside of that, don't stress about the material. A material alone doesn't make the frame, the quality and way it is put together determines the strength and how it performs. You could easily make an alloy frame that is stronger than Ti or steel by using the right tube profiles and thicknesses, so keep an open mind WRT frame material.
brawlo is offline  
Old 04-27-20, 10:20 PM
  #5  
Russ Roth
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: South Shore of Long Island
Posts: 864

Bikes: 2010 Carrera Volans, 2015 C-Dale Trail 2sl, 2017 Raleigh Rush Hour, 2017 Blue Proseccio, 1992 Giant Perigee, 80s Gitane Rallye Tandem

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 314 Post(s)
Liked 211 Times in 159 Posts
Originally Posted by dcgriggs79 View Post
  • As a result of the last two points, I'm thinking I want a steel or Ti full suspension frame, 29er
  • Bikes I'm finding that fit this description like the Litespeed Unicoi don't specify weight ratings. They're expensive - not prohibitively - but more than I probably should spend considering I'm just a weekend rider and don't race.
  • A buddy is telling me that weld joints on steel and Ti are also susceptible to breaking and that I'm worrying too much
So I'm kind of at a loss for what to do. Maybe buy a steel frame and then buy heavy duty components for a self/custom build? I feel like others have trod this path before, so I'm interested in hearing anyone's thoughts or experiences about where I should/could go from here. Much appreciated!

Chris
When it comes to full suspension I don't think you'll find much of a price difference between steel and Ti, last steel dual suspension I saw was fairly pricey too as its going to be a small builder.
Being a weekend rider and not a racer is no reason to not spend the money that gets you what you want if you can afford it. My new cross bike is going to be well beyond me. My training this year has been good enough, and I got close enough last year, that this year I might not get last place in the handful of cat 5 cross races I'll do; usually I comfort myself with knowing I beat anyone who dropped out. It will be nicer then 2/3 of all the bikes at the starting line who will all probably beat me and it doesn't matter, its mine, I like it, I want it and I'm actually riding it. Remember there's plenty of bikes rotting away in garages because the owners spent that much or more and still can't be bothered to ride; if it makes your ride more enjoyable its money well spent and no one else's business.
I've seen more broken aluminum than steel, and haven't see broken ti though I know it happens. The headtube isn't ripping off anything unless its abused or poorly built. Do have to say the litespeed is lovely and probably worth it. You might have to do something about the wheels but maybe not, my hardtail came with with 1.8 spokes which I would never spec for someone my weight and they've held fine but 29" mtb tires cushion a lot.
Russ Roth is offline  
Old 04-27-20, 11:27 PM
  #6  
Chad991
Senior Member
 
Chad991's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Ohio
Posts: 100

Bikes: Lynsky Helix Pro

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 19 Posts
Contact Lynsky bikes,I'm 270 and ride one of their road bikes
Chad991 is offline  
Old 04-28-20, 01:50 PM
  #7  
SethAZ 
Senior Member
 
SethAZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,394

Bikes: 2018 Lynskey R260, 2005 Diamondback 29er, 2003 Trek 2300

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 562 Post(s)
Liked 326 Times in 180 Posts
I didn't ride my (alu-framed) hardtail mountain bike off road until I was under 300, and even then while off road it's taken a severe beating with me doing not-very-technical single track on it in the 270-290-lb weight range. I'm not sure typical suspensions are made to last with a 335-lb rider. I know the front suspension on my hardtail is essentially shot. With a hardtail, especially, if you can't "ride light" by shifting your weight to your legs when you're going over bumps and whatnot you're putting massive forces into the rear end especially of your bike. I haven't looked into these so I don't know what's available, but you might want to look into those "thudbuster" style shock-dampened seat posts. If you can get a measure of suspension in the seatpost it might not only make things more comfortable for you, but lessen the max loading on the bike itself, which can only help it survive longer.

I just did a quick look, and there are a bunch of options for seatpost suspension. Here's one that claims to support up to 320-lb riders. Here's that thudbuster version. In my quick search there are plenty of other options.

Note: I haven't tried any of these suspension seatposts myself. I'm just thinking that if you're worried about the stresses you're putting on your mountain bike at your weight on a hardtail (and I think your concern is warranted), an option like this might well help reduce the pounding your bike is taking. My own MTB is at the point where I either need to overhaul it, or buy a new bike. It was never an expensive bike to begin with (paid like $600 for it new), so it's probably not worth what it would cost me to overhaul it. I'm looking at these suspension seat posts for myself, since it seems like a reasonable compromise to be able to stick with a hardtail while still getting a measure of suspension that at least would protect the bike better from the max loading of unpredictable full-weight-in-saddle bumps, ruts, rocks, etc. In all likelihood my next MTB will be full suspension, however. My own problem is that I have a hard time constraining my wandering thoughts to cheaper options, and the Lynskey Ti full-suspension MTB that I've had my eye on is currently financially unattainable (my wife signed off on my Lynskey ti road "dream" bike, but she probably wouldn't do it again for a MTB). While not financially wise, it may be more doable given domestic politics to just fix up my current hardtail, and if I do, a suspension seat post is likely in my future.

I do think for off-road use you really do want as wide of tires as you can get on your MTB. Given the weight and the fact it's a hardtail, the largest-volume tires you can put on that bike would probably both make your ride more comfortable and reduce the max loading on the bike itself. That can only be a good thing.

One last thing about tires: you really gotta pick road or trail. You really don't want to be riding good trail knobbies on the road because you'll wear them out insanely fast, and you really don't want to be riding tires good for the road while out on trails. If you want to use this one bike for both road and trails, consider at least getting a second wheelset and having appropriate tires on each for the intended usage. I rode my MTB on the road with narrower and slick road-like tires until I was well under 300 lbs and picked up a road bike. I then re-dedicated the MTB to trail riding, put trail tires on it, and it only gets used on trails now. When I first bought that MTB and it had knobby trail tires on it, I'd worn the knobbies halfway down already with just 300 miles of road riding. That's when I switched to more roadish tires.
SethAZ is offline  
Old 05-02-20, 07:52 AM
  #8  
Gconan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 627

Bikes: Norco search xr

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 78 Posts
For standing on pedals.
Gconan is offline  
Old 05-02-20, 07:54 AM
  #9  
Gconan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 627

Bikes: Norco search xr

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 184 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 78 Posts
Also for standing on the pedals.
Gconan is offline  
Likes For Gconan:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.