Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

28c vs 32c?

Old 09-25-20, 11:17 AM
  #1  
Herzlos
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Posts: 84

Bikes: Voodoo Limba, Carrera Vulcan, Revolution Trailfinder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 14 Posts
28c vs 32c?

So I picked up a 2nd hand few week old bike a few weeks ago (Carrera Zelos), which comes on 700x28c tyres though the wheels can go up to 700x32c.
Am I (at 91kg) likely to notice much difference going 4mm wider?
Herzlos is offline  
Old 09-25-20, 12:20 PM
  #2  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 6,472

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1428 Post(s)
Liked 534 Times in 360 Posts
Depends on your weight and the roads you ride, and the pressure you'd need in each size (not to mention which tire, which is a hole 'nuther thread).

I find 28 a bit rougher on rough roads, but slightly quicker on the front. YMMV.
pdlamb is offline  
Likes For pdlamb:
Old 09-25-20, 12:56 PM
  #3  
c_m_shooter
Senior Member
 
c_m_shooter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Paradise, TX
Posts: 1,866

Bikes: Soma Pescadero, Surly Pugsley, Salsa Fargo, Schwinn Klunker, Gravity SS 27.5, Monocog 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 98 Post(s)
Liked 122 Times in 92 Posts
That is an aluminum frame, so wider tire would probably be a little better ride. Tires are individual though, and I don't know your road conditions.
c_m_shooter is offline  
Likes For c_m_shooter:
Old 09-25-20, 01:10 PM
  #4  
Herzlos
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Posts: 84

Bikes: Voodoo Limba, Carrera Vulcan, Revolution Trailfinder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 14 Posts
I'm in Central Scotland, our roads are pretty awful. I haven't been on a proper ride yet to see if it's too bad on the 28c's.
Herzlos is offline  
Old 09-25-20, 02:18 PM
  #5  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,567

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3886 Post(s)
Liked 1,316 Times in 815 Posts
Originally Posted by Herzlos View Post
So I picked up a 2nd hand few week old bike a few weeks ago (Carrera Zelos), which comes on 700x28c tyres though the wheels can go up to 700x32c.
Am I (at 91kg) likely to notice much difference going 4mm wider?
I’d say no. Too much fuss is made about marginal width changes on tires. To give some perspective, take two 2 pence coins and stack them. (Two nickels for us “Mericans) That’s the width and height change. And the amount of change in ride characteristics is going to be about as valuable.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 09-25-20, 03:13 PM
  #6  
wthensler 
Senior Member
 
wthensler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Gatorland and BlueRidge heaven
Posts: 772

Bikes: 2021 Trek Domane SLR 7, 2012 Giant Defy 0, 2012 Trek Domane 6.2 P1, Bianchi Infinito CV disc Di2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 207 Post(s)
Liked 987 Times in 246 Posts
Huge difference.

I have both (tubeless) - 28s on the Bianchi Infinito and 32s on the Trek Domane.

The difference in volume is what gives the much smoother ride on the Domane.

When the Bianchi needs new tires, I will switch up to the 32s.
__________________
Ride hard and ride on......
wthensler is offline  
Likes For wthensler:
Old 09-25-20, 03:48 PM
  #7  
Herzlos
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Posts: 84

Bikes: Voodoo Limba, Carrera Vulcan, Revolution Trailfinder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Iíd say no. Too much fuss is made about marginal width changes on tires. To give some perspective, take two 2 pence coins and stack them. (Two nickels for us ďMericans) Thatís the width and height change. And the amount of change in ride characteristics is going to be about as valuable.
It may only be a 4mm increase, but that's nearly 15% at these widths.

Originally Posted by wthensler View Post
Huge difference.

I have both (tubeless) - 28s on the Bianchi Infinito and 32s on the Trek Domane.

The difference in volume is what gives the much smoother ride on the Domane.

When the Bianchi needs new tires, I will switch up to the 32s.
I think that's where I'm at - I may just keep the 28's until I wear them out (I'm hoping to spend a lot of time on the turbo trainer over winter) and then replace them with 32's. Unless I stumble across a cheap enough set of 32's. If I recall correctly the inner tubes I have will work with both.
Herzlos is offline  
Likes For Herzlos:
Old 09-25-20, 06:09 PM
  #8  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,567

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3886 Post(s)
Liked 1,316 Times in 815 Posts
Originally Posted by Herzlos View Post
It may only be a 4mm increase, but that's nearly 15% at these widths.
The only place it matters is at the contact patch. Iíve done the calculations before and it works out to a few milliliters more volume. Itís tiny in the grand scheme of things.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 09-26-20, 01:33 PM
  #9  
skidder
Bipsycorider
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,216

Bikes: Why yes, I do have a few! Thank you for asking!

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 546 Post(s)
Liked 259 Times in 192 Posts
The 28c tires I've ridden were rated for 110psi pressure, most 32c for 70-80psi. Purely my speculative opinion but it seems the 32c give a more 'cushioning' effect since its not pumped up to as high pressure and can flex a little over bumps and road crap. And . . .its easier to pump up a tire to 70psi than to 100psi when you're on the side of the road fixing a flat tire. Those last few pumps at 100psi can be a b!tch!
skidder is offline  
Old 09-28-20, 03:33 AM
  #10  
Herzlos
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Posts: 84

Bikes: Voodoo Limba, Carrera Vulcan, Revolution Trailfinder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 14 Posts
Very good point, I've never gone above about 50psi before and even with a track pump that's a bit of work. 100psi on a compact hand pump must be awful!
Herzlos is offline  
Old 09-30-20, 12:42 PM
  #11  
jfoobar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 145
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
The only place it matters is at the contact patch. Iíve done the calculations before and it works out to a few milliliters more volume. Itís tiny in the grand scheme of things.
That's only really true if you don't account for the change in psi between thinner and wider tires. Considering a 180lb rider and two otherwise identical tires (using Schwalbe's recommended PSI for the Marathon Plus as an example), the contact patch difference between 95 psi (the recommended psi for 28c) and 80 psi (the recommended psi for 32c) is almost 20%. That is without even considering the additional increase in contact patch from the tire width increase as well.
jfoobar is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 12:40 AM
  #12  
Bill Kapaun
Really Old Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Posts: 12,379

Bikes: 87 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1244 Post(s)
Liked 431 Times in 336 Posts
If your roads are rough, you'll probably appreciated that little extra "squish" to help "absorb" peak impacts. Especially sharp edged potholes.
Your wheels will appreciate it too, with smaller peak loads on the spokes.
Bill Kapaun is offline  
Old 10-06-20, 12:54 AM
  #13  
Badger6
Speedy bikes & hoppy brew
 
Badger6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Brussels (BE) 🇧🇪
Posts: 271

Bikes: '15 Spesh Diverge,'14 Spesh Fatboy, '18 Spesh Epic, '18 Spesh SL6, '21 Spesh SL7...and maybe n+1?

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 31 Posts
A little extra will always matter...we've got crap roads here in Belgium, too (not all, but many), as well as a fair amount of cobblestone and pavť. I've ridden 28, 30, 32 across all of this. Bigger is always more comfortable, and not necessarily "slower." Check out this link from SILCA for determining pressures, I use it, and have never had an issue, I pretty much don't care what is printed on the sidewall because it doesn't take into account all the factors at play such as total system weight, surface condition, actual measured tire width, etc.
Badger6 is offline  
Likes For Badger6:
Old 11-04-20, 05:57 PM
  #14  
Moisture
Banned.
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 515 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 71 Posts
Originally Posted by c_m_shooter View Post
That is an aluminum frame, so wider tire would probably be a little better ride. Tires are individual though, and I don't know your road conditions.
Just because a frame is aluminum does not mean it will always have zero compliance.

A small different in tire width wont make much difference according to the actual tire design as well as the tpi (threads per inch)
Moisture is offline  
Old 11-05-20, 04:33 AM
  #15  
C.corri
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
FWIW. My older bike only fits up to 25c and the newer bike has 32c. After riding both for many years I grab the 32c bike much more than I do the 25c.
C.corri is offline  
Old 11-05-20, 10:45 AM
  #16  
jsigone
got the climbing bug
 
jsigone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,953

Bikes: one for everything

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 66 Posts
I've ran panaracer gravelking in both 28 and 32s for several yrs now. I don't find there is much rolling resistance feel between the two but the comfort level in the rough stuff does feel different. They are soft and grippy tires in the turns w/ decent/good flat protection.

If you can fit it, 32 should be way to go. I run the slick(file thread version) and they are about $35 on amazon prime.
https://www.panaracer.com/lineup/gravel.html
__________________
Rule #10 // It never gets easier, you just go faster.
jsigone is offline  
Old 11-05-20, 11:48 AM
  #17  
Moisture
Banned.
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 515 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 71 Posts
Originally Posted by jsigone View Post
I've ran panaracer gravelking in both 28 and 32s for several yrs now. I don't find there is much rolling resistance feel between the two but the comfort level in the rough stuff does feel different. They are soft and grippy tires in the turns w/ decent/good flat protection.

If you can fit it, 32 should be way to go. I run the slick(file thread version) and they are about $35 on amazon prime.
https://www.panaracer.com/lineup/gravel.html
Different width tires will have the same contact patch with the surface when going in a straight line, if they are all ran at the same PSI.
Moisture is offline  
Old 11-05-20, 11:57 AM
  #18  
jsigone
got the climbing bug
 
jsigone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,953

Bikes: one for everything

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 66 Posts
Well that is the beauty of larger tires. You can run them at lower tire pressures to get the feel or traction desired.

my 28s Iíd run them about 80psi tubed

my 32s Iíd run them about 60f/65r tubed

no point having all that case volume just to pump it up to max that is printed on the tire....
__________________
Rule #10 // It never gets easier, you just go faster.
jsigone is offline  
Old 11-05-20, 12:30 PM
  #19  
Moisture
Banned.
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 515 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 71 Posts
Originally Posted by jsigone View Post
Well that is the beauty of larger tires. You can run them at lower tire pressures to get the feel or traction desired.

my 28s Iíd run them about 80psi tubed

my 32s Iíd run them about 60f/65r tubed

no point having all that case volume just to pump it up to max that is printed on the tire....
Definetely. i want to try a tubeless setup in the near future.

Gotta also consider that the width of your rim will change overall tire width. I've played around with a caliper measuring tool here and there and noticed that nearly all tires run at roughly .1 inch narrower than what is advertised on the tire.
Moisture is offline  
Old 11-06-20, 03:25 PM
  #20  
Herzlos
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: Glasgow, Scotland
Posts: 84

Bikes: Voodoo Limba, Carrera Vulcan, Revolution Trailfinder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 14 Posts
As an update; I went to buy a pair of 32c tyres for the bike, and in the end bought a new bike with 700x40c tyres on. So I've dropped from 90psi to 50psi and the comfort difference is incredible!
Herzlos is offline  
Old 11-06-20, 08:20 PM
  #21  
jaxgtr
Senior Member
 
jaxgtr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 4,745

Bikes: Trek Domane SLR 7, Trek ALR 6, Trek CrossRip, Trek X-Caliber 8

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
Liked 181 Times in 109 Posts
well that is one way to do it.... Congrats.
__________________
Brian | 2021 Trek Domane SLR 7 | 2016 Trek Emonda ALR 6 | 2016 Trek X-Caliber 8 | 2014 Trek CrossRip Comp
Originally Posted by AEO View Post
you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way.







jaxgtr is offline  
Likes For jaxgtr:
Old 11-07-20, 08:16 AM
  #22  
Moisture
Banned.
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 515 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 71 Posts
Originally Posted by Herzlos View Post
As an update; I went to buy a pair of 32c tyres for the bike, and in the end bought a new bike with 700x40c tyres on. So I've dropped from 90psi to 50psi and the comfort difference is incredible!
Going tubeless can also really improve comfort
Moisture is offline  
Likes For Moisture:
Old 11-09-20, 05:19 PM
  #23  
tallbikeman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Yolo County, West Sacramento CA
Posts: 367

Bikes: Modified 26 inch frame Schwinn Varsity with 700c wheels and 10 speed cassette hub. Ryan Vanguard recumbent. 67cm 27"x1 1/4" Schwinn Sports Tourer from the 1980's. 1980's 68cm Nishiki Sebring with 700c aero wheels, 30 speeds, flat bar bicycle.

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Liked 82 Times in 61 Posts
I have an old steel road bike with 700c x 32mm Gatorskin tires and am very happy with it. It does go off road but frankly my 700c x 40mm equipped bike is much better for off road. I also ride the older 27" x 1 1/4" wheel size with Schwalbe Marathon tires and it is quite comfortable and good handling. I ride the 27" wheels offroad a lot but again 40mm is better offroad. Had to get my two cents in.
tallbikeman is offline  
Old 11-09-20, 07:16 PM
  #24  
Moisture
Banned.
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 766
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 515 Post(s)
Liked 87 Times in 71 Posts
Originally Posted by tallbikeman View Post
I have an old steel road bike with 700c x 32mm Gatorskin tires and am very happy with it. It does go off road but frankly my 700c x 40mm equipped bike is much better for off road. I also ride the older 27" x 1 1/4" wheel size with Schwalbe Marathon tires and it is quite comfortable and good handling. I ride the 27" wheels offroad a lot but again 40mm is better offroad. Had to get my two cents in.
As far as i understand, 27" rims are the exact same size as 700c. I installed a 700c rim onto the front of my vintage road bike just for fun and it fit perfectly.

As for the rear rim, there is so little clearance between the chainstays, that even if the rim bends slightly, the tire begins to rub. I measured the tire as 1.1 inches wide using a park tool caliper thingy...

I simply tried to compensate by adjusting the angle of the rear rim between the chinstays. I've already trued the rear rim twice. I can't tension two of the spokes properly or the wheel will simply bend more. After doing whatever I can to make the rim almost perfectly true, it loses tension and becomes slightly bent again the very next day. I need to replace the rear tire but I'm sort of weary to even bother until I can get this rubbing issue figured out.

Other than getting a new rim, any suggestions?
Moisture is offline  
Old 11-09-20, 08:28 PM
  #25  
jaxgtr
Senior Member
 
jaxgtr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Posts: 4,745

Bikes: Trek Domane SLR 7, Trek ALR 6, Trek CrossRip, Trek X-Caliber 8

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 89 Post(s)
Liked 181 Times in 109 Posts
700c is not the same as 27, but they are very close. 27 in is 630mm and 700C is 622 which will explain the tightness you are getting. How wide are the rims and what size size tire are you running?
__________________
Brian | 2021 Trek Domane SLR 7 | 2016 Trek Emonda ALR 6 | 2016 Trek X-Caliber 8 | 2014 Trek CrossRip Comp
Originally Posted by AEO View Post
you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way.







jaxgtr is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.