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Build bike for big brother!

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Build bike for big brother!

Old 10-17-20, 02:01 AM
  #1  
degan
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Build bike for big brother!

I tend to ramble, so I'll try to keep this brief. As the title states, I'm going to building a bike for my bro, who is around #330-#350. I've asking him from time to time if he would be interested in a bike. Up until recently he hasn't shown any interest in one but that tune has seemed to have changed.

Anyway, I traded frames with a buddy for the purpose of building it up for my brother with a specific fork I had already, but the more research I do, the more I question whether or not the frame would be good for my brother. I should have come here first, because it seems like the go to choice is a rigid steel frames w/26" wheels, which I already had in spades. Unfortunately, the frame I traded for is a full suspension 1996 GT LTs-3 that I planned on pairing with a Marzocchi Bomber fork.


The cons; its full suspension, which seems to mean a lot more points to possibly fail, and the frame is AL, which does not have forgiving properties that a steel frame has. If there are more please let me know. Pros; the suspension isn't some crappy Suntour junk, the Bomber fork is pretty sweet and the rear shock is literally solid rubber. Also the frame has been beefed up with extra material pretty much anywhere tubes meet. It also takes 26" wheels, which is good.

The only part of the rear triangle I'm really concerned about is the hinge thats out near the dropout. The whole seat cluster/rear shock area seems to be built up pretty good and the bottom bracket area seems to have a good deal of material around it, but that pivot point on the chainstays is just dangling out there and appears to be the weakest point to me.

What are peoples thoughts? Is any sort suspension a no-go or are there exceptions? Same with aluminum. Should I even bother building up this frame for him or should I go straight to the rigid frame options? I'm a marginal clydesdale, if I were to build it with him in mind, is there anything I could look for while test riding it that would indicate it could handle 100+ extra pounds?

Thanks,
Dan

Last edited by degan; 10-17-20 at 02:07 AM.
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Old 10-18-20, 04:34 PM
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brawlo
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Interesting old school frame. Are you planning to get him offroad, or just getting him out riding pavement? If pavement is the aim, the the rear suspension should give some cush to give a nicer ride, assuming it's far more firm than an actual rear shock. At the front, I'd have no real issues with front suspension, but something firmer or with lockout does make the ride a lot better. As for material, I don't think it would matter that much. Just get him out and riding
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Old 03-17-21, 09:21 PM
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degan
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Originally Posted by brawlo View Post
Interesting old school frame. Are you planning to get him offroad, or just getting him out riding pavement? If pavement is the aim, the the rear suspension should give some cush to give a nicer ride, assuming it's far more firm than an actual rear shock. At the front, I'd have no real issues with front suspension, but something firmer or with lockout does make the ride a lot better. As for material, I don't think it would matter that much. Just get him out and riding
Yeah, I thought a solid rear shock would be better for flat riding then a more traditional rear shock. I see what you're saying about the front. Sometimes a squishy fork can be a pain to ride on the road. Its adjustable and I have a couple options if he doesn't like it. Its about done, just waiting for the weather to turn a bit more.
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