Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Clydes and Wheels,

Old 04-05-21, 11:55 AM
  #1  
MRT2
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 6,319

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1031 Post(s)
Liked 198 Times in 139 Posts
Clydes and Wheels,

A couple of weeks ago when I took my bike out for the first ride of the spring riding season, I noticed a tiny crack around one of the spoke holes. Sadly, the crack has worsened, and so now I am building a new wheel around my Velo Orange hub. My mechanic just ordered a new Velocity rim which hopefully will last at least as long as the cheaper Alex rim I was using.

Check your wheels folks. Though it is a huge bummer to be buying another wheel, or at least rim, it would have been much worse had the wheel failed in the middle of a big ride, or had I discovered the problem the day of a big ride.
MRT2 is offline  
Likes For MRT2:
Old 04-05-21, 12:56 PM
  #2  
UCantTouchThis
Senior Member
 
UCantTouchThis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 1,349
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 513 Post(s)
Liked 1,084 Times in 517 Posts
Which Velocity rim are you going to use? Deep V's have worked flawlessly for me over 20+ years.

I'm to the point where I will not use a cheap rim like Alex or stock Bontrager. Last couple of bikes I bought, the rims didn't even see pavement. I built wheels for the new bikes and never look back. Sometimes use the Fusion for the front as it is 5 mm less on the profile but yet, still very strong.

I myself have not had problems on a big ride but friends have. I carry my spoke wrench and make needed adjustments for them to finish the ride or head for safety. Pretty easy process to straighten up the wheel enough to make it back.
UCantTouchThis is offline  
Old 04-05-21, 01:01 PM
  #3  
MRT2
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 6,319

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1031 Post(s)
Liked 198 Times in 139 Posts
Originally Posted by UCantTouchThis View Post
Which Velocity rim are you going to use? Deep V's have worked flawlessly for me over 20+ years.

I'm to the point where I will not use a cheap rim like Alex or stock Bontrager. Last couple of bikes I bought, the rims didn't even see pavement. I built wheels for the new bikes and never look back. Sometimes use the Fusion for the front as it is 5 mm less on the profile but yet, still very strong.

I myself have not had problems on a big ride but friends have. I carry my spoke wrench and make needed adjustments for them to finish the ride or head for safety. Pretty easy process to straighten up the wheel enough to make it back.
We are going with the Dyad. Hopefully will be the right mix of durability but still reasonable weight.
MRT2 is offline  
Likes For MRT2:
Old 04-05-21, 01:53 PM
  #4  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 6,737

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1538 Post(s)
Liked 723 Times in 455 Posts
Alex rims, while they're inexpensive, are usually built stouter than higher-priced rims. This is where a spoke tensiometer can help, or failing that, a musical tuner. Unless you've ridden over curbs or canyon-sized potholes, you've exceeded the upper limit on spoke tension, which cracked the rim. As a fellow clyde, I can appreciate your need to increase spoke tension to prevent spoke breakage from cyclic stressing, but as you've found out, too much is just as bad as too little.
pdlamb is offline  
Likes For pdlamb:
Old 04-05-21, 02:56 PM
  #5  
UCantTouchThis
Senior Member
 
UCantTouchThis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 1,349
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 513 Post(s)
Liked 1,084 Times in 517 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
Alex rims, while they're inexpensive, are usually built stouter than higher-priced rims. This is where a spoke tensiometer can help, or failing that, a musical tuner. Unless you've ridden over curbs or canyon-sized potholes, you've exceeded the upper limit on spoke tension, which cracked the rim. As a fellow clyde, I can appreciate your need to increase spoke tension to prevent spoke breakage from cyclic stressing, but as you've found out, too much is just as bad as too little.

Good point. I have had local bike shops build Mavic OP's in the past, early on. One builder had cracks around the spoke holes and the other, braking surface actually split. I think they added too much tension seeing I am a big rider. Plus I have never had good luck with low profile rims like Mavic OP, Mavic T (tandem box type) rims, and anything lower than 25 mm on the rear of the bike. I use a 23 on the front of one of my bikes but I avoid low profile on the rear. I'll stick with the 30mm rims. I'm guessing those others were adding too much tension. I build my own now, have for years so I verify the tension is correct.

I think the previous builders using low profile tried to go with a tension that was too high to accommodate rider weight. All I know is 25-30 mm work better for me. 20,000+ trouble free miles out of the rear wheels. 28 or 32 spoke.
UCantTouchThis is offline  
Old 04-05-21, 04:37 PM
  #6  
MRT2
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 6,319

Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1031 Post(s)
Liked 198 Times in 139 Posts
Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
Alex rims, while they're inexpensive, are usually built stouter than higher-priced rims. This is where a spoke tensiometer can help, or failing that, a musical tuner. Unless you've ridden over curbs or canyon-sized potholes, you've exceeded the upper limit on spoke tension, which cracked the rim. As a fellow clyde, I can appreciate your need to increase spoke tension to prevent spoke breakage from cyclic stressing, but as you've found out, too much is just as bad as too little.
There is a possiblity this happened early last fall when I hit something in the road and went down hard, though I assumed it was my front wheel that hit the crack/pothole, but it is possible my back wheel hit it, too.
MRT2 is offline  
Old 04-18-21, 11:55 PM
  #7  
Bill in VA
Senior Member
 
Bill in VA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 662

Bikes: Current: 2016 Bianchi Volpe; 1973 Peugeot UO-8. Past: 1974 Fuji S-10-S with custom black Imron paint by Stinsman Racing of PA.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 195 Post(s)
Liked 167 Times in 117 Posts
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
We are going with the Dyad. Hopefully will be the right mix of durability but still reasonable weight.
The Velocity Dyad is a very nice rim. I have them in 36 holes on my second wheelset for rough road riding. That is now my primary wheelset with the Alexrims A23 now being the secondary. The builder said I could have easily gone to 32 holes, but said the 36 was a good choice for my uses. I also had Velocity Veloplugs (red) installed. The Veloplugs make tire mounting so easy that I only need levers for the initial install. YES, no more rim tape! I do not feel any weight increase, but these wheels have butted spokes and the Alex A23 OEM wheels had straight guage.

I got mine in silver with machined side walls and use cantilever brakes. The maker/model name decals were a bit large, but they came right off. Two years now and still good and still perfectly true..
Bill in VA is offline  
Likes For Bill in VA:
Old 04-19-21, 08:50 AM
  #8  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,985

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 121 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4098 Post(s)
Liked 1,583 Times in 970 Posts
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
A couple of weeks ago when I took my bike out for the first ride of the spring riding season, I noticed a tiny crack around one of the spoke holes. Sadly, the crack has worsened, and so now I am building a new wheel around my Velo Orange hub. My mechanic just ordered a new Velocity rim which hopefully will last at least as long as the cheaper Alex rim I was using.

Check your wheels folks. Though it is a huge bummer to be buying another wheel, or at least rim, it would have been much worse had the wheel failed in the middle of a big ride, or had I discovered the problem the day of a big ride.
Rims can crack. Any rim can crack. Iíve ridden a lot of expensive rims and a lot of cheap rims. Iíve ridden lots of different brands of rims as well. The number of ones that have cracked at the spoke holes are about evenly distributed between brands and cost. Iíve cracked Velocity rims, Mavic rims, Araya rims, Weinmann rims, and a bunch of others.

Cracking of a rim can occur with either tight spokes or loose spokes and both have a similar cause. Spokes are constantly undergoing tensioning and detensioning. Aluminum is a soft material and doesnít really undergo constant flexing well but that constant tension/detension cycle is exactly what the rim is undergoing. Thereís a pseudo Goldilocks tension level but the rim is still going to flex with each rotation. We big guys happen to make the rim flex more than smaller people so we (probably) tend to crack more rims.


You are also making a mistake in thinking that a cracked rim will result in a catastrophic failure. The wheel is not likely to collapse in the middle of a ride. The wheel may not stay true but itís not going to fail in a mode that would result in a crash.

Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
...Unless you've ridden over curbs or canyon-sized potholes, you've exceeded the upper limit on spoke tension, which cracked the rim...
Dropping off curbs and hitting potholes arenít going to cause the cracks. Cracks are more of a chronic problem. A localized impact...even a large one...will flex the rim but the rest of the wheel structure absorbs that impact. The aluminum, being soft, will likely absorb a lot of the energy of a single impact. The constant flexing during the tension/detension cycle is what does the damage to the aluminum.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 04-25-21, 02:35 PM
  #9  
SCTinkering
Senior Member
 
SCTinkering's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
Posts: 123

Bikes: 2020 T-Lab X-3 w/GRX Di2, 2018 Trek FX-5S with GRX/Xt 1x drive train

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Liked 30 Times in 18 Posts
I just run Gravel Wheels. Mavic Allroad and Shimano GRX. Double bonus is running very fat tires.

40mm Yksion on the Mavics
38mm GravelKing + on the GRX.

They're no Zipp 353 NSWs, but the tubeless are mounted, they hold air and can take a hit.

As all things Clydesdale / Athena your mileage may very (I guess literally in this case)

Last edited by SCTinkering; 04-25-21 at 07:40 PM.
SCTinkering is offline  
Old 05-30-21, 09:48 PM
  #10  
tallbikeman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Yolo County, West Sacramento CA
Posts: 408

Bikes: Modified 26 inch frame Schwinn Varsity with 700c wheels and 10 speed cassette hub. Ryan Vanguard recumbent. 67cm 27"x1 1/4" Schwinn Sports Tourer from the 1980's. 1980's 68cm Nishiki Sebring with 700c aero wheels, 30 speeds, flat bar bicycle.

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 112 Post(s)
Liked 102 Times in 73 Posts
I recently found a brake track crack on a Velocity Chukker 700c rim on the back of one of my bikes. The rim is 15 years old, has 36 spokes, running on a Velo Orange hub. The brake track has quite a bit of wear. This bike was used on gravel roads a lot. I assume that the brake track wear plus all the rotational tensioning cycles over the years caused this failure. Probably buy another Chukker rim at this point. The rim failure was spotted by pulsing in the rim brake lever. This led me to inspect and find this problem. This rim had been installed on four different hubs over the years. Sorry to see it go.
tallbikeman is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.