Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Exercise-Injury-Doubt

Old 04-28-21, 08:14 AM
  #1  
since6 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lacey, WA
Posts: 1,663

Bikes: Stevenson Custom, Stevenson Custom Tandem, Nishiki Professional

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 354 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 157 Times in 103 Posts
Exercise-Injury-Doubt

He sits on my office stereo where our tandem sits on the trainer that I ride. He's just returned from the summit of Mt. Rainier, but I hardly recognize him looking in the mirror. That 30 year old man was once me. How did I get from him to here? How from 4+ hour rides three times a week less than a half dozen years ago, to struggling through two 20 minute sets on the trainer.

A back surgery and year plus of Covid, in a time of great stress as we enter, I believe a time of change unlike that seen since the industrial revolution of the 18th century.

So I take up my "worn out tools" as the poem says, but there's the problem, age and weight, meniscus pain in a knee that only iffly is coming along for the ride. So exercise is always close to the razor's edge of injury, more than ever I must go "slow" to get to "fast".

The doubt.

How have you kept the mental, the training plan going? How do you keep the links of getting back to three/four hours in a day (or whatever that highest level is for my age now), three days of a week, weeks of a month, which as we age is a lifetime commitment?
What has worked for you?

Thanks for listening and for your thoughts.
since6 is offline  
Old 04-28-21, 11:38 AM
  #2  
blacknbluebikes 
Senior Member
 
blacknbluebikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: NJ, USA
Posts: 665

Bikes: two blacks, a blue and a white.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 177 Post(s)
Liked 274 Times in 129 Posts
"Because you can" is what I tell myself, a lot. There came a time when I was suddenly "that guy" going up the subway steps to the street, so slow that everyone going to work had to push around me. Months before, I was taking steps two-at-a-time. A basic staircase was suddenly a mountain and I had a 200lb pack. Taught me that "you never know someone else's story." Took at least 18 months to get back. Now, I see an escalator next to a staircase and I take the stairs - "because I can." And, because I hate hate hate that feeling when I could not.
blacknbluebikes is offline  
Likes For blacknbluebikes:
Old 04-28-21, 02:15 PM
  #3  
kirby999
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Somewhere South
Posts: 1,327

Bikes: Electra Fat Tire ,Specialized Rockhopper, Hardrock.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 210 Post(s)
Liked 2,050 Times in 694 Posts
I’ll be 70 in a few weeks , have struggled with knee , leg and hip pain , Especially the last six months . Before that I was having a great year for my age and had lost over twenty pounds . From 300 down to around 280 . Just before my knees started acting up I had gotten down to around 275 .
I almost gave up riding until I figured out my cranks were too long on four of my bikes . Four of the ones I ride the most .
This past winter was colder and wetter than last year and didn’t help .
Now , I’m back to trying to ride some everyday , even if it’s only 2-3 miles around the neighborhood.
I did a Greenway path ride of 15 miles last week and a couple 10+ mile MUP rides .
I’m finally getting back to-where I was before and hope I can continue.
I love riding my bikes and hope I have at least 10 more years .
kirby999 is offline  
Old 04-28-21, 04:23 PM
  #4  
UCantTouchThis
Senior Member
 
UCantTouchThis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 1,368
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 525 Post(s)
Liked 1,103 Times in 527 Posts
So you're about 36? Wow, you're very young. I keep telling myself that I'm young at 58. I think that helps.
UCantTouchThis is offline  
Likes For UCantTouchThis:
Old 04-28-21, 08:54 PM
  #5  
since6 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lacey, WA
Posts: 1,663

Bikes: Stevenson Custom, Stevenson Custom Tandem, Nishiki Professional

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 354 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 157 Times in 103 Posts
36?! LOL

No, more like in a few years you could stuff two 36 year olds inside this body, And thanks by the way for your comments and suggestions. That picture and climb was from my latter 20s/early 30s when I climbed most of the Cascade peaks, then got back to bike riding, a childhood first love, then into organized rides, then into tandem rides with wife and long rides completing a Cycle Oregon, but now I'm climbing back in my late 60s.

But today I had a good day in our Miata, hows that relevant?

It seems that riding the bike trainer is helping the bad knee, as online MD sites suggested it would.

Today I put that bike trainer exercise to the test when I had to work a Miata clutch for an hour in rush hour stop and go traffic. I was surprised that the knee did not fail, nor did the hamstring.

So tomorrow back on the trainer.
since6 is offline  
Likes For since6:
Old 04-30-21, 05:07 PM
  #6  
Clyde1820
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 1,393
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 426 Post(s)
Liked 258 Times in 201 Posts
Originally Posted by since6 View Post
How have you kept the mental, the training plan going? What has worked for you?
Had a nearly catastrophic injury to one leg, 40 years ago. Was a modestly competitive distance runner who trained with Division I/II NCAA athletes (former teammates and others). So I know the regimen, determination, mindset and consistency required.

For me what's worked despite the injuries is: daily something.

Beyond ensuring good nutrition and sleep, striving to always get some moderate to intense exercise in, on a day, even if it's a pitiful attempt, even if it's a "recharge" day such that the effort I'm doing is modest but of sufficient time to keep the muscles "fed," stretched, etc. Of course, any training regimen's going to have tiers of effort, variations through the week and month as improvements are made, as illness hits, as a recovery day is required, and so on. Nobody's "on" daily. But it's funny how doing something fairly solid on a daily basis begets better mindset, begets better muscles, begets better skills, smoother technique, etc.

Layer on an appropriate training regimen (ie, fartlek runs occasionally, with moderate mileage weekly, with an occasional hard hills session, with an occasional sprint session), tailored to your goals. With cycling, it'd be various routes, various intensities, training sessions, good "base" mileage days with occasional hard sprint/hill days, leveraging the cycling computer to capture data about the rides' specifics and tracking improvements over time.

But, at the base of it all, doing something and sticking with it. With modest aches and strains, with modest challenges to nutrition and fluid intake, with modest fatigue, generally I've found that daily attempts help recovery, even on "recovery" days when the effort is deliberately (necessarily) modest.

Most people will find that the body will start "talking" to you, letting you know when it's got more for the asking, can handle an increase in toughness or frequency of the regimen. At which point, you ratchet-up things and pump up the volume. Gradually, as the body can tolerate it. In time, you improve.

Now, that said, the injuries were nearly catastrophic. So my leg's ability to get a job done is vastly less than it once was. So I work within what's possible, given that limitation. Ain't pretty, mostly. Certainly isn't inspiring, from a performance standpoint. But it keeps my legs working, keeps me healthier than otherwise, gets me outside, aids my cardio, gets me away from the normal crush of people (on a longer walk or hike or bike ride). If nothing else, even if it's a modest effort and of questionable physical benefit beyond the basics, it's still a great "recharging" opportunity for me.
Clyde1820 is offline  
Old 05-01-21, 08:26 AM
  #7  
since6 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lacey, WA
Posts: 1,663

Bikes: Stevenson Custom, Stevenson Custom Tandem, Nishiki Professional

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 354 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 157 Times in 103 Posts
Thanks Clyde1820 and congratulations on maintaining and finding a way through a serious injury.

What you say is really what our great grandparents did. There were no off days if you wanted to eat. Only the rich or hormonaly imbalanced had the luxury of fat, most everyone else was lean muscle. Just look back at a black and white of early professional football, 240 lbs. was a line man and 300+lbs football players didn't exist. You did activities every day and often dawn to dusk for survival, family, creating more from your life, there was no social media or intrusion from the internet.

I worry about resting to avoid injury and/or the no man's land of overuse, but these were terms they never even thought of and they lived active, engaged lives. Much to think of.
since6 is offline  
Old 05-01-21, 04:06 PM
  #8  
Clyde1820
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 1,393
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 426 Post(s)
Liked 258 Times in 201 Posts
Originally Posted by since6 View Post
Thanks Clyde1820 and congratulations on maintaining and finding a way through a serious injury.

What you say is really what our great grandparents did. There were no off days if you wanted to eat. Only the rich or hormonaly imbalanced had the luxury of fat, most everyone else was lean muscle. Just look back at a black and white of early professional football, 240 lbs. was a line man and 300+lbs football players didn't exist. You did activities every day and often dawn to dusk for survival, family, creating more from your life, there was no social media or intrusion from the internet.

I worry about resting to avoid injury and/or the no man's land of overuse, but these were terms they never even thought of and they lived active, engaged lives. Much to think of.
I know somebody who once ran quite a bit, not all that rapidly but quite long distances. He'd been out of it for some years (grad school) and let the body go quite a bit. Began walking. Kept walking until the body was just begging to go a bit quicker, at which point he added in alternating jog/walk stints. Worked up to 10mi sessions. Kept doing this, and after a year or so he began jogging modestly. As the body began crying out to pour it on, he ramped-up the speeds and terrain until he was back running again. Took awhile. But his body slowly adapted and got all the little supporting muscles in line, readjusted his metabolism to cope with the increasing loads, etc. Basically, he did something daily and never wavered. In time, the body told him when it was ready go really go. He'd never gotten injured. And doing it this way ensured he got the mental aspects nailed down early. Was a slow slog, to get up to the point of running again, but it was safe and appropriate for a 50-something to approach that way.

Can't say it'll work for everyone, but our bodies seem to adapt reasonably well when fed a steady diet of activity. Whatever that activity is.

Last edited by Clyde1820; 05-03-21 at 01:26 PM. Reason: spelling
Clyde1820 is offline  
Old 05-03-21, 08:30 AM
  #9  
since6 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Lacey, WA
Posts: 1,663

Bikes: Stevenson Custom, Stevenson Custom Tandem, Nishiki Professional

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 354 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 157 Times in 103 Posts
Well, now start writing down all calories as I eat them and a limit for the day. Changing of food choices, because exercise is going to take a back seat until a left knee meniscus injury is sorted out. It seems the Miata drive was a last straw of sorts, doing twisting one leg 300+ lbs. leg lift out of a sports car was too much. So now down to 20 minute rides on the trainer and getting into the doctor to see if we can set up and MRI to determine what the state of injury is and how to regain sleep again with a new higher threshold of pain. So a new challenge, though some days you get tired of them.
since6 is offline  
Old 05-03-21, 12:30 PM
  #10  
kirby999
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Somewhere South
Posts: 1,327

Bikes: Electra Fat Tire ,Specialized Rockhopper, Hardrock.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 210 Post(s)
Liked 2,050 Times in 694 Posts
Originally Posted by since6 View Post
Well, now start writing down all calories as I eat them and a limit for the day. Changing of food choices, because exercise is going to take a back seat until a left knee meniscus injury is sorted out. It seems the Miata drive was a last straw of sorts, doing twisting one leg 300+ lbs. leg lift out of a sports car was too much. So now down to 20 minute rides on the trainer and getting into the doctor to see if we can set up and MRI to determine what the state of injury is and how to regain sleep again with a new higher threshold of pain. So a new challenge, though some days you get tired of them.
I sold my Miata four years ago. It just got too hard to get out of for me and my wife . Miss it some days . Loved that little car .
kirby999 is offline  
Old 05-03-21, 01:49 PM
  #11  
zjrog
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,689

Bikes: 1986 KHS Fiero, 1989 Trek 950, 1990 Trek 7000, 1991 Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo, 1992 Trek 1400, 1997 Cannondale CAD2 R300, 1998 Cannondale CAD2 R200, 2002 Marin San Rafael, 2006 Cannondale CAAD8 R1000, 2010 Performance Access XCL9R

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 271 Post(s)
Liked 249 Times in 170 Posts
Yeah, the 30 year old me was a monster. The 58 year old me is chicken... I fell away from cycling 20 plus years ago. Yeah, I rode here and there but nothing serious. Until my left knee replacement Nov 2010. Then I started on the indoor trainer, and worked up to outdoors. But, in Aug of 2011, I crashed BAD on my bike. Broke my back, messed up my neck, massive concussion. And FEAR. Lots of fear. No doubt I wanted to ride again. But it took me 3 years to get on a bike. And that bike was a gift at a time I needed a push. But I'd gained a lot of weight and just didn't have the drive, and yes, that FEAR...

Three years ago I got the crap scared out of me. My cardiologist put the fear in my. I was nursing a bad ankle, and the other knee was failing, I couldn't exercise enough to correct 3 problems fast enough. So I had weight loss surgery. And the cardiologist put me in her cardiac rehab program. That got me going again with the bike. Admittedly, more on the trainer than outdoors. I got a reward bike for 140 pounds lost... And that was a great experience. Still had the fear, and I just learned to ride through it sometimes. Other times, not so much... I slowed down for the winter of 2019/2020. And then Covid... I lost ALLLLLL motivation.

Last October, I had my right knee replaced. It was either the knee had to be done, or the ankle needed to be fused. I didn't know which to do first. Ankle guy wouldn't touch the ankle till I got the knee done, which settled that problem. Knee is 7 months old, and fantastic. I've had great luck with both. Same surgeon for both as well.

Last month I made a concerted effort to get back on the indoor bike. Zwift had their "Tour of Watopia", and seemed just the motivator I needed. I got through it. And I struggled a few times. But I can't say I ever doubted myself. This past weekend I got out on one of my old MTBs. Rode with my 10 year old Granddaughter. I realized a couple things. The Vetta Gel saddle on that old Trek 7000, is a bad impersonation of a rock. And, how did we ride trails on hard bikes? I love my front suspension 29er... I guess the old bikes were good for their time. I also realized my Granddaughter is growing faster than her father did, so it seems. I need to ride more.

I guess my suggestion is, ride as you can within your limits. Doubt can be managed easier than fear. And indoor bike is a poor replacement for outdoors, but sometimes, is the better option.
zjrog is offline  
Likes For zjrog:
Old 05-03-21, 01:58 PM
  #12  
shelbyfv 
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 8,361
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2257 Post(s)
Liked 2,181 Times in 1,183 Posts
I wouldn't bother to ride if it wasn't enjoyable, plenty of other stuff to do. I sold my Miata a few years ago. I can ride the bike all day but two or three hours in the Miata would cripple me.
shelbyfv is offline  
Likes For shelbyfv:
Old 05-03-21, 06:39 PM
  #13  
Clyde1820
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 1,393
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 426 Post(s)
Liked 258 Times in 201 Posts
Originally Posted by kirby999 View Post
I sold my Miata four years ago. It just got too hard to get out of for me and my wife . Miss it some days . Loved that little car .
Same boat, here. Legs won't support the weight transfer needed (due to old injuries) when exiting very low-to-the-ground vehicles like the Miata. I wince every time I see such a wonderful, sporty, low car ... 'cause I know my ever driving it would be a most painful exercise.
Clyde1820 is offline  
Likes For Clyde1820:
Old 05-03-21, 07:19 PM
  #14  
kirby999
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Somewhere South
Posts: 1,327

Bikes: Electra Fat Tire ,Specialized Rockhopper, Hardrock.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 210 Post(s)
Liked 2,050 Times in 694 Posts
Originally Posted by Clyde1820 View Post
Same boat, here. Legs won't support the weight transfer needed (due to old injuries) when exiting very low-to-the-ground vehicles like the Miata. I wince every time I see such a wonderful, sporty, low car ... 'cause I know my ever driving it would be a most painful exercise.
I replaced it with a classic 1987 Mustang GT convertible that I kept for three years , I was the third owner . It was a little better getting in and out of but didnít drive like the Miata . The Miata would have run rings around it .
Now that spot in the garage is full of bikes .


Last edited by kirby999; 05-03-21 at 07:22 PM.
kirby999 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.