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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Bike for weight loss...

Old 06-30-22, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by philbob57
There are few absolutes in weight loss. One of them is that a calorie deficit - calories in - calories out = a negative number) will almost definitely result in weight loss. If you add biking to your life without cutting down any other activity and without adding to your calorie intake, you'll almost definitely lose weight. (If you ride with vigor, you'll probably trade fat for muscle, which is probably a good trade, especially if you bike consistently over time. This might slow down weight loss.)

The problem is that it's not easy to keep up eating fewer calories than one burns, and it's not east to exercise consistently, but saying, 'This makes cycling unreliable as a daily, sustainable and easily accessed method of calorie consumption' is overstating the case.

Yeah, losing 25 lbs requires a deficit of about 80,000 calories, but that requires averaging only a 220 kcal/day deficit for a year. Not easy, but doable.
According to my Garmin watch and bike computer I've burned about 59,000 calories biking since mid March. I also stopped drinking beer during the week and have tried to control my portion sizes a little but basically eat the same thing as I did before and I've lost around 23 pounds in that time.
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Old 07-01-22, 01:12 PM
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It's not about cico

I have been a very fat guy all of my life.
I am 41 now and at 136kg. (think 300 pounds)
I love biking.
But the more I ride the harder it is for me to lose weight.
In fact I gained 10kgs after doing a supported road trip (290km or about 180miles)in 2 days.
So I learned that this is a hormonal issue instead of a calorie related one.
I read Dr. Fungs book the obesity code
Read his fasting books.
That is the only thing that works for me ; following a low carb /keto diet.
Also intermittent fasting.
100 hours was my record.
​​​​​​I am trying to avoid high intensity exercise as it might raise the cortisol and therefore insulin levels and make you very hungry.Besides you are not burning fat, you are burning mostly glucose.

Watched a video by this Stef ekberg ex-athlete that clearly explains this.
​​​​​​So sticking to long and slow (20kmh or 12mph)rides for weight loss.goal is to burn fat 85% and glucose just 15%.being fat adapted/fasted helps.

​​​​​​I have a hybrid with 700x32c Schwalbe duranos and so far the back wheel is still holding. Maybe will switch to even wider tyres since aero doesn't really matter till you hit 30kmh(or 19 for you us based guys)
Well if traffic allows me to since I have bike lanes for 30% of my commute in Bucharest.
Hope this helps.
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Old 07-01-22, 01:33 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by philbob57
If you add biking to your life without cutting down any other activity and without adding to your calorie intake, you'll almost definitely lose weight.
Well, no, you might continue to gain weight but more slowly.
Trust me on this one.
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Old 07-09-22, 06:57 AM
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I went from 350 to 200 in about two years. I try to ride most days, between 10 and 30 miles, but usually for an hour long loop. I started with a used Kona Dew and now have a bunch of bikes. I like sightseeing and biking is interesting. Honestly, the biggest thing I did was stop "cycling" food into my mouth. Not having seconds at meals is the key. And I love food! Good luck!
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Old 07-09-22, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by johnnywhale
I went from 350 to 200 in about two years. I try to ride most days, between 10 and 30 miles, but usually for an hour long loop. I started with a used Kona Dew and now have a bunch of bikes. I like sightseeing and biking is interesting. Honestly, the biggest thing I did was stop "cycling" food into my mouth. Not having seconds at meals is the key. And I love food! Good luck!

I agree to the cycling food in your mouth to help lose weight thought there is more to it than just how much you eat. What is more important than how much. You won't overdo it on fruits, vegetables and some grains vr going a standard American diet. Stay away from overly processed and added sugars will give you the most benefit.
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Old 07-09-22, 10:39 AM
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I dropped over 20lbs from March 2020-July 2020 purely on cycling. I ate EVERYTHING (minimum a gallon of ice cream in a week, plus desserts I made with my daughters and ex-wife) and drank not nightly but close to it with my ex-wife. I was riding between 50-120 miles a week. Cycling can be a great weight loss tool. If riding just to ride, it might be difficult to lose. Going out and pushing, riding hills, feeling the burn and pushing through, weight loss will happen no matter what. One thing to factor in is muscle weight. as you build muscle, weight will drop faster but the scale won't say it. I went back to work after lock-down and several people were asking others who I was because they didn't recognize me.

WHAT you eat will factor more than how much. Watching what you eat will defiantly aid in the weight loss, as I have done 2 triathlons in the past year, I am still 250, I do have food issues that I work with a therapist with ( I also work in kitchens so tasting food all day doesn't help my issues.) Training for #3, this will be my 3rd different "diet" I am on. First one was no restrictions, 2nd tri, no added sugars, limit processed foods, this one is no added sugars, no processed foods, fruit intake has gone up as well, plant protein and not the fake meats. Each one defiantly different results with training. I may not always lose on the scale, but I can see parts of my body that is toned and not covered in fat. I will not limit fats or carbs. Plenty out there to prove fat is not the issue.
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Old 07-10-22, 06:55 PM
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Lifestyle changes


3years ago I weighed in at 384 pounds. I was feeling terrible, wanted off my sugar and BP meds. I was riding around 100 miles a week, but did not control my diet. I decided to go to a nutritionist/dietitian to make a serious commitment to lose weight. I have given up diet soda and eat only my portions. Riding is great for cardio and assisting in losing weight, but diet is everything. Iím 67 years old, currently weight in at 211 pounds. Itís not easy and has to be a complete lifestyle change.
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Old 07-21-22, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by dfritch

3years ago I weighed in at 384 pounds. I was feeling terrible, wanted off my sugar and BP meds. I was riding around 100 miles a week, but did not control my diet. I decided to go to a nutritionist/dietitian to make a serious commitment to lose weight. I have given up diet soda and eat only my portions. Riding is great for cardio and assisting in losing weight, but diet is everything. Iím 67 years old, currently weight in at 211 pounds. Itís not easy and has to be a complete lifestyle change.
I agree, diet is everything. I ride about 25 miles a day and I don't lose weight, but I'm not trying to lose weight. I am right at 200 lbs and 6'-2". When I retired about 4 years ago I was around 220 lbs, a went down to 215 when I started riding a lot. I lost a lot a weight when had an accident and had a few surgeries, down to 185. Gained a few pounds back to be on this site, LOL. Now I hover at 200 lbs. I am just trying to stay healthy and fit. The effect of all this bike riding is it reduced the amount of meds that I take.
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Old 09-16-22, 02:12 AM
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Exercise bike for weight loss

Although you have you need an outdoor bike for weight loss but indoor exercise bikes are great to cut your extra fat and help you getting in shape faster,

Last edited by Siu Blue Wind; 09-17-22 at 12:38 PM.
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Old 10-20-22, 12:44 PM
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MichWolverines8 what was the problem with the old 925? Saddle discomfort? Generally uncomfortable? Something else?

When your body changes shape it generally means the way you fit on a bike changes, too. My weight goes up and down - around 250 now, but as an adult I have been as low as 220 and up around 300 - and, especially when heavier, there are issues with my belly compressing my torso and making it harder to breathe. I have enough base miles that I can generally deal with saddle pain if the saddle is a decent match for my anatomy.
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Old 10-20-22, 04:32 PM
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In the Summer of 1974 I bicycled to a summer job-I was in college. Had a 1973 Schwinn Suburban 5-speed, steel rims. Fairly flat terrain. In 4 weeks I took 2 inches off my waist. You want to burn calories, get a heavier bike!
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Old 10-21-22, 11:52 AM
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After years of being overweight, I purchased a bike this week. When working I was 200-210. Once I got up to 250 and now down to 229#. 6' tall. Goal is 180 by May 2023. Tired of being a couch potato... tired of taking meds that can be eliminated.
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Old 11-03-22, 08:06 PM
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Everyone's correct in saying that you can't outride a bad diet. The bike's a very efficient vehicle, so you can ride almost every day and not lose weight at all, something I know all about. Fit and fat is really not a myth. I am really quite fit right now, and even though I have lost 20 kg/44 lbs or a bit more, I'm still obese. That is changing, but it has to do with eating, rather than bike riding.

Intermittent fasting at 16:8, 20:4 and 23:1 are all really useful tools for weight loss and adapting your body to habitually burning larger amounts of fat in conjunction with glycogen stores. Not eating for 16-23 hours seems difficult, until you try it. If you eat whole grains, vegetables, fruit and lean protein during your feeding window, you can get off the up-down roller coaster of blood sugar spikes after eating simple carbs, and you are much less hungry. There, many, like Jason Fung, mentioned above, who advocate a Keto approach with fasting, but, if like me you need to watch your LDL cholesterol levels, whole grains, vegetables, lean meat and healthy polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats are much better options.

I ride fasted habitually, sometimes for 100 kms or more, purely on glycogen stores and fat reserves, and after a while, you do not really bonk. I can feel when my glycogen stores are particularly low, but as your body becomes more accustomed to it, it knows that it has to make fresh glycogen from stored fat, because food is still hours away. That's the process of becoming fat adapted, not in the keto sense, but in the IF sense when you're not in a ketogenic state and eating complex carbohydrates during most meals. You can train the body to make better use of its own energy reserves, thus losing fat.
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