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Suggestions for Big guy who needs a bike

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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Suggestions for Big guy who needs a bike

Old 06-30-22, 08:21 PM
  #1  
pottjar34
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Suggestions for Big guy who needs a bike

Looking to rejoin the world of cycling. I’m 49-years-old, have a bad knee, am 6’6” tall and weigh roughly 380lbs! Yup! A big guy. Planning to work hard at bringing weight down.

Currently have a XXL framed bike, but two years ago when I went on it, both tires exploded before I got even an 1/8th of a mile. A bit scary. Trying to avoid such a predicament again.

Looking for a bike for paved trails that can accommodatemy current size.

I haven’t been able to find many options with exception of a recumbent bike called: GREENSPEED MAGNUM XL. It’s rated for my size and within my budget (under 4k).

Just wondering if anyone has any other recommendations. I was told that an upright bike is a better workout, so leaning more towards that if possible.

Appreciate any advice!

Thank you
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Old 07-01-22, 05:38 AM
  #2  
400E
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Lots of good options. Check out Zinn Cycles. Leonard Zinn himself is a tall cyclist and he specializes in bikes for big folks like us (I am 6'8", 220 lbs but was up to 300). Am looking at one of his Clydesdale road bikes myself; currently ride a Surly Disc Trucker and like it.
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Old 07-01-22, 03:09 PM
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Second the recommendation to check out Zinn...I have a Ti road / endurance bike from their Clydesdale line.....but pucker up...I spent almost 7 grand on mine before I was done.....
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Old 07-01-22, 05:04 PM
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pottjar34
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Thank you for that suggestion…umm…7k…😳..thats not in the cards for now…
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Old 07-01-22, 11:15 PM
  #5  
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Look at Gunnar Bikes, I looked at the gravel bikes and they have bikes in the size of 68cm. I'm 6'-2" and ride a bike around 58-60cm.
Giant gravel bikes sizing indicates an XL would fit a height of 6'-2" to 6'-7". Your weight may be the limiting factor.
I look at the gravel bikes because they have the capacity of wider tires and that would work better for your weight.
With the Gunnar, they are more of a frame and add the parts so you can get some 36 spoke wheels, which would work better for your weight.
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Old 07-02-22, 12:18 PM
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Could I use my existing bike? Changing the rims and tires to absorb my weight.
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Old 07-02-22, 12:19 PM
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Could I use my existing bike? Changing the rims and tires to absorb my weight.
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Old 07-02-22, 08:49 PM
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Sure, I think that would be fine, I would just put the widest tires on the bike that will fit and try that.
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Old 07-04-22, 10:52 AM
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If the frame and seating position of your current bike are comfortable, I would absolutely consider just getting a sturdy wheelset built. There are Clyde wheel options out there. Look for something with a higher spoke count.

I have a Velocity Cliffhanger on the back of my Kona Sutra and, though only 'officially' rated to 300lb, I have put my fat ass + loaded Ortlieb panniers out back and thrown on over a thousand miles.
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Old 07-13-22, 11:34 AM
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When I got back into cycling a while ago I looked at Worksman. They mostly make bikes for industrial application, food carts, warhouses, so i at least know they make stuff sturdy enough and most there bikes, even there 2 wheelers have a capacity of about 400 lbs or so.
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Old 07-15-22, 09:25 AM
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Just FYI, Diamondback specs their frames with a 300-pound weight limit, and Giant's the same. Frequently Asked Questions | Diamondback Bikes

What is the maximum rider weight for your bikes?

Our bike frames are tested to carry up to 300 lbs of rider weight which includes your body weight plus any additional weight like a pack.
If a Zinn is out of your price range, you can try one of the reputable Chinese framebuilders, either Waltly, Titan Cycles or XACD. Any of them can build a superstrong frame for someone your weight. Titan has the shortest production time right now, at about five weeks. Their production MTB frames start at only $800 plus shipping and they could build with larger diameter, thicker-walled tubes at not much additional cost, if any. https://www.aliexpress.com/store/gro...260248593.html

At your weight, you should probably stay with 26" wheels. Smaller wheels are generally stronger. But get someone to tension and true the wheels, as machine-built wheels are notoriously weak.
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