Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Is My Fork Safe?

Old 08-10-22, 05:11 PM
  #1  
O.B.Cyclist
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2022
Posts: 1

Bikes: 2015 Trek 1.1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Is My Fork Safe?

To avoid being run over, I took a curb at full sprint last week. From roughly 20mph the front wheel completely stopped on the curb, I flew like superman, and the bike landed on top of my back. Front wheel destroyed. My bike is a Trek 1.1 which has a carbon fork. The bike shop inspected the fork and declared it safe. I'm pretty ignorant of bikes but I've heard of carbon cracking when crashed and then suddenly failing catastrophically sometime later with no warning.

Should I trust the fork after it pole vaulted me and the bike at 20mph? It was a violent hit.
O.B.Cyclist is offline  
Old 08-10-22, 05:17 PM
  #2  
jsigone
got the climbing bug
 
jsigone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Diego
Posts: 10,107

Bikes: one for everything

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 599 Post(s)
Liked 545 Times in 185 Posts
sounds like excuse to buy a new bike.....
__________________
Rule #10 // It never gets easier, you just go faster.
jsigone is offline  
Likes For jsigone:
Old 08-10-22, 07:16 PM
  #3  
stevel610 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Valley Forge: Birthplace of Freedom
Posts: 1,229

Bikes: Novara Safari, CAAD9, WABI Classic, WABI Thunder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 341 Post(s)
Liked 406 Times in 214 Posts
How much is your medical insurance max out of pocket. (Mine is currently $600 for an ER visit.) Figure if you would rather pay it on to the bike shop or hospital.😉
__________________
Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love.
stevel610 is offline  
Likes For stevel610:
Old 08-11-22, 09:29 AM
  #4  
Kobe 
Senior Member
 
Kobe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Schwenksville, Pa
Posts: 2,815

Bikes: '80 Mercian Olympic, '07 Rivendell AHH, '16 Clockwork All-Rounder, '22 New Albion Privateer

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 257 Post(s)
Liked 240 Times in 149 Posts
If the impact was enough to ruin the front wheel, I would figure there was a decent amount of stress on the carbon. You might not see it, but it COULD be there. It would always be in the back of my mind.
__________________
Kobe is offline  
Likes For Kobe:
Old 11-06-22, 12:03 PM
  #5  
randomgear
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: beantown
Posts: 943

Bikes: '89 Specialized Hardrock Fixed Gear Commuter; 1984? Dawes Atlantis

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Check the downtube as well, a few inches back from the headtube - it takes a lot of stress during a front impact. Might be fine to ride, after all the wheel collapsing blunted the force of the impact to the frame and fork. Know any carbon frame builders in the area, they might be able to do a real check.
randomgear is offline  
Old 11-08-22, 08:42 AM
  #6  
Milton Keynes
Senior Member
 
Milton Keynes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 3,921

Bikes: Trek 1100 road bike, Roadmaster gravel/commuter/beater mountain bike

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2259 Post(s)
Liked 1,680 Times in 921 Posts
A year ago in October the bearings in my front wheel froze up, the skewer broke, I lost my front wheel and I went down, breaking my hand and kissing the pavement. That is not an experience I ever want to relive, so I'd get a new fork just to be on the safe side.
Milton Keynes is offline  
Old 11-08-22, 09:20 AM
  #7  
base2 
Doesn't brain good.
 
base2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 2,464

Bikes: 5 good ones, and the occasional project.

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1360 Post(s)
Liked 1,094 Times in 627 Posts
If the front wheel remained intact, the force of impact would have had to go somewhere. Likely into the fork & the rest of the bike. It seems to me the front wheel acted like a fuse, failed catastrophically & isolated the force of the impact from the rest of the system.

If you're looking for an excuse to buy a fork, go ahead. But, with the bike shops "ok" it's probably not necessary.

WoundUp makes good, no nonsense carbon forks in a broad range of specs. Not light by carbon fork standards. Strong. Manufactured in Utah, if that matters to you.
__________________
I shouldn't have to "make myself more visible;" Drivers should just stop running people over.

Car dependency is a tax.
base2 is offline  
Likes For base2:
Old 11-08-22, 01:13 PM
  #8  
randallr
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Broomfield, Colorado
Posts: 460

Bikes: 2017 Gunnar CrossHairs Rohloff, 2022 Detroit Bikes Cortello

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
Liked 115 Times in 75 Posts
When the bike shop looked at the fork and pronounced it safe, did they just look at it visually, or did they do some additional types of inspection?
randallr is offline  
Old 11-08-22, 02:26 PM
  #9  
TugaDude
Senior Member
 
TugaDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 3,353
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Liked 565 Times in 410 Posts
Originally Posted by randallr View Post
When the bike shop looked at the fork and pronounced it safe, did they just look at it visually, or did they do some additional types of inspection?
My concern is whether they are even qualified to render an opinion in the first place. Liability being what it is, I have a hard time understanding why they'd even comment. The correct answer, to me is, "we can't tell anything by a visual inspection of the fork. If you are concerned, you probably should simply replace it. Otherwise, the manufacturer may agree to take a look at it and determine whether it is fit for riding or not." That's what I would have done.

A visual inspection is next to useless. Especially if you aren't educated on what to look for.

I say replace it.
TugaDude is offline  
Likes For TugaDude:
Old 11-09-22, 09:06 PM
  #10  
cyclist2000
Senior Member
 
cyclist2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Up
Posts: 4,670

Bikes: Masi, Giant TCR, Eisentraut (retired), Jamis Aurora Elite, Zullo, Cannondale, 84 & 93 Stumpjumpers, Waterford, Tern D8, Bianchi, Gunner Roadie, Serotta, and looking for a Brompton M6R or T-line

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 301 Post(s)
Liked 1,965 Times in 582 Posts
Just replace it. An Enve carbon fork is only around $450, I'm sure that you can find something more economical. At high speeds a fork failure or front wheel failure is the worse scenario. Medical bills from my big crashes are a lot more expensive than $450.
cyclist2000 is offline  
Likes For cyclist2000:
Old 11-20-22, 05:28 AM
  #11  
tim24k
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: NW
Posts: 747

Bikes: To many to list. I like them all!

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 32 Posts
For peace of mind I would replace the forks.
tim24k is offline  
Old 11-20-22, 02:11 PM
  #12  
georges1
Steel is real
 
georges1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 817

Bikes: 1992Giant Tourer,1992MeridaAlbon,1996Scapin,1997KonaKilaueua,1993Peugeot Prestige,1991RaleighTeamZ(to be upgraded),1998 Jamis Dragon(to be built),1992CTWallis(to be built),1998VettaTeam(to be built),1995Coppi(to be built),1993Grandis(to be built)

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 187 Post(s)
Liked 319 Times in 200 Posts
Change the carbon fork and replace it by one with a steel pivot
georges1 is offline  
Old 12-26-22, 04:00 PM
  #13  
Kontact
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 4,651
Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2908 Post(s)
Liked 437 Times in 280 Posts
Companies like Ruckus and Calfee can find damage a bike shop can't with scanning equipment. If the bike is nice, I would have both the frame and fork scanned.

If not, you can roll the dice that the wheel absorbed the impact. But you'll feel pretty dumb if the front end fails on a descent. Especially since you've posted this in the clydes forum and are already stressing the bike more than someone 120 pounds would.
Kontact is offline  
Old 12-27-22, 01:31 PM
  #14  
HIPCHIP
Lance Legweak
 
HIPCHIP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Woodland, California, USA
Posts: 856

Bikes: Felt Z-70, GT RTS-2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 16 Times in 13 Posts
I’d pull the front wheel, lay the bike on its side, and push and pull and twist on the fork legs individually and see if there was anything that stood out. If everything feels solid then try riding around slowly for awhile and see if there are any weird squeaks, etc. If everything seems good you are probably safe. Sounds like the front wheel took most of the impact. If you are still worried then just replace it.
HIPCHIP is offline  
Old 12-28-22, 08:14 AM
  #15  
Kontact
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 4,651
Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2908 Post(s)
Liked 437 Times in 280 Posts
Originally Posted by HIPCHIP View Post
Id pull the front wheel, lay the bike on its side, and push and pull and twist on the fork legs individually and see if there was anything that stood out. If everything feels solid then try riding around slowly for awhile and see if there are any weird squeaks, etc. If everything seems good you are probably safe. Sounds like the front wheel took most of the impact. If you are still worried then just replace it.
This process will not reveal stress cracks in carbon.
Kontact is offline  
Old 01-10-23, 08:47 PM
  #16  
stevel610 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Valley Forge: Birthplace of Freedom
Posts: 1,229

Bikes: Novara Safari, CAAD9, WABI Classic, WABI Thunder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 341 Post(s)
Liked 406 Times in 214 Posts
Originally Posted by O.B.Cyclist View Post
To avoid being run over, I took a curb at full sprint last week. From roughly 20mph the front wheel completely stopped on the curb, I flew like superman, and the bike landed on top of my back. Front wheel destroyed. My bike is a Trek 1.1 which has a carbon fork. The bike shop inspected the fork and declared it safe. I'm pretty ignorant of bikes but I've heard of carbon cracking when crashed and then suddenly failing catastrophically sometime later with no warning.

Should I trust the fork after it pole vaulted me and the bike at 20mph? It was a violent hit.
What did you wind up doing?
__________________
Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love.
stevel610 is offline  
Old 01-11-23, 05:50 PM
  #17  
grumpus
Full Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 278
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 112 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 77 Posts
Originally Posted by stevel610 View Post
What did you wind up doing?
Never posting again, apparently - I wonder if the fork got him.
grumpus is offline  
Likes For grumpus:
Old 01-11-23, 07:03 PM
  #18  
redshift1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Australia
Posts: 71
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 17 Posts
While not directly related to the possible fork damage question, I observed something about a week ago which has amazingly left me in no doubt what to do if ever I am heading into a curb ( for whatever reason. )

A cyclist travelling fast ( I'm estimating 30 km/h ) on the road was obviously in no mind to slow down and wait for his turn to join the cycle path at the conventional point. Instead he continued with unabated speed square on to an upcoming curb and just when I thought he was an amateur about to subject his bike to a big impact ( whether he made it over the kerb or not ), he performed the most effortless lift of the entire bike ( up about 4 or 5 inches ) and silently slid over the curb as if it wasn't there.

Of course you need to be using clipless pedals and it's best to do a few practice "jumps" on the flat to get the feel of it.

I am pretty sure I will remember to do this in future if ever faced with an involuntary "kerbing" as it left quite an impression on me and most likely would save bike and possible limb. Worth doing as unlikely to do anything but improve the outcome.
redshift1 is offline  
Old 01-11-23, 09:12 PM
  #19  
base2 
Doesn't brain good.
 
base2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 2,464

Bikes: 5 good ones, and the occasional project.

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1360 Post(s)
Liked 1,094 Times in 627 Posts
Originally Posted by redshift1 View Post
While not directly related to the possible fork damage question, I observed something about a week ago which has amazingly left me in no doubt what to do if ever I am heading into a curb ( for whatever reason. )

A cyclist travelling fast ( I'm estimating 30 km/h ) on the road was obviously in no mind to slow down and wait for his turn to join the cycle path at the conventional point. Instead he continued with unabated speed square on to an upcoming curb and just when I thought he was an amateur about to subject his bike to a big impact ( whether he made it over the kerb or not ), he performed the most effortless lift of the entire bike ( up about 4 or 5 inches ) and silently slid over the curb as if it wasn't there.

Of course you need to be using clipless pedals and it's best to do a few practice "jumps" on the flat to get the feel of it.

I am pretty sure I will remember to do this in future if ever faced with an involuntary "kerbing" as it left quite an impression on me and most likely would save bike and possible limb. Worth doing as unlikely to do anything but improve the outcome.
"Bunny hop."
It's cool for manhole covers, speed bumps & potholes,
__________________
I shouldn't have to "make myself more visible;" Drivers should just stop running people over.

Car dependency is a tax.
base2 is offline  
Likes For base2:
Old 01-11-23, 11:29 PM
  #20  
stevel610 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Valley Forge: Birthplace of Freedom
Posts: 1,229

Bikes: Novara Safari, CAAD9, WABI Classic, WABI Thunder

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 341 Post(s)
Liked 406 Times in 214 Posts
Originally Posted by redshift1 View Post
While not directly related to the possible fork damage question, I observed something about a week ago which has amazingly left me in no doubt what to do if ever I am heading into a curb ( for whatever reason. )

A cyclist travelling fast ( I'm estimating 30 km/h ) on the road was obviously in no mind to slow down and wait for his turn to join the cycle path at the conventional point. Instead he continued with unabated speed square on to an upcoming curb and just when I thought he was an amateur about to subject his bike to a big impact ( whether he made it over the kerb or not ), he performed the most effortless lift of the entire bike ( up about 4 or 5 inches ) and silently slid over the curb as if it wasn't there.

Of course you need to be using clipless pedals and it's best to do a few practice "jumps" on the flat to get the feel of it.

I am pretty sure I will remember to do this in future if ever faced with an involuntary "kerbing" as it left quite an impression on me and most likely would save bike and possible limb. Worth doing as unlikely to do anything but improve the outcome.
As someone else said, the term is "bunny hop". Youtube it for instructions. Don't need clips btw, just good technique.
__________________
Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love.
stevel610 is offline  
Old 01-12-23, 01:24 PM
  #21  
grumpus
Full Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 278
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 112 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 77 Posts
Originally Posted by redshift1 View Post
Of course you need to be using clipless pedals .
Tell that to the people who do it with flat pedals - clipping in is considered by some people to be cheating. Think about riding up a kerb by leaning back to lighten the front wheel, then leaning forward to lighten the back wheel as you roll up the bump. Then do it faster while crouching and jumping - that's the simplified version of how to bunny hop.
grumpus is offline  
Old 01-12-23, 01:27 PM
  #22  
Trakhak
Senior Member
 
Trakhak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 3,845
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1544 Post(s)
Liked 1,571 Times in 915 Posts
Originally Posted by redshift1 View Post
While not directly related to the possible fork damage question, I observed something about a week ago which has amazingly left me in no doubt what to do if ever I am heading into a curb ( for whatever reason. )

A cyclist travelling fast ( I'm estimating 30 km/h ) on the road was obviously in no mind to slow down and wait for his turn to join the cycle path at the conventional point. Instead he continued with unabated speed square on to an upcoming curb and just when I thought he was an amateur about to subject his bike to a big impact ( whether he made it over the kerb or not ), he performed the most effortless lift of the entire bike ( up about 4 or 5 inches ) and silently slid over the curb as if it wasn't there.

Of course you need to be using clipless pedals and it's best to do a few practice "jumps" on the flat to get the feel of it.

I am pretty sure I will remember to do this in future if ever faced with an involuntary "kerbing" as it left quite an impression on me and most likely would save bike and possible limb. Worth doing as unlikely to do anything but improve the outcome.
You'd better practice on level surfaces for a while before trying curbs/kerbs.
Trakhak is offline  
Old 01-13-23, 05:18 PM
  #23  
redshift1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Australia
Posts: 71
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 17 Posts
"Bunny hop".

Yes that's the term I now vaguely recall from somewhere.

I won't actually be jumping any curbs as I ride just for the exercise, mental health, etc. benefits. And particularly as my next bike is framed with 531 Pro ( and I'm 85 kg ), I won't be risking the frame and forks from a mis-timed curb jump.

My point was that seeing how effortlessly that rider I saw lift his entire bike over the curb, that there is an alternative to running square on to a curb, if forced to like the O.P.

After having gone over the handlebars of a dirt bike travelling about 40 km/h a few years ago, when the front wheel was "stopped" by an approx. 4 inches diameter gnarly branch across the path, I can understand the OP's predicament and resulting accident. I would have sworn that wheel was going to roll over that branch...

Lifting the front wheel of a bicycle even a couple of inches would substantially reduce the risk of being "stopped" by the curb. It may still be a violent thump but with much less risk of damage and injury. Looking side on to a bicycle front wheel, the difference in the approach angle of the tyre to the curb at a height of 4 inches cf. 2 inches, is very apparent.

Of course, remembering to lift the front, even clumsily, in the heat of an accident situation will be a major issue for riders who haven't thought about it previously or practiced at least some.

I'll be practicing a bit on the flat but don't intend adding jumping curbs to my daily riding journeys. And of course, I'll keep up the defensive riding to avoid the curbs in the first place .
redshift1 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.