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Retrofat 2001 Giant Boulder or buy new?

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Retrofat 2001 Giant Boulder or buy new?

Old 02-29-08, 02:12 PM
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Retrofat 2001 Giant Boulder or buy new?

Need everyone's advice?

I have a 2001 Giant Boulder in good condition. I used it for a couple of years in college and haven't rode since. I am 270 pounds (5'7") - I was only 200 then.

Would it be easier for me to try and retrofat my old Boulder or buy a new bike? I know I will need new rims and tires.

Does anyone have a good website to recommend? I would like to do research on how to retrofat my bike before going to the store.
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Old 02-29-08, 06:19 PM
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What type of riding are you going to be doing?
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Old 02-29-08, 08:33 PM
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What's wrong with the rims? Maybe a simple truing & tensioning would fix them?

IF you actually do need a new rear wheel, you could upgrade the drive train to a 9 speed cassette. You would also need new shifters and chain if you do so. Add a pair of "skinny street tires" and you'd have a pretty decent "pavement" bike.
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Old 03-01-08, 10:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun
What's wrong with the rims? Maybe a simple truing & tensioning would fix them?

IF you actually do need a new rear wheel, you could upgrade the drive train to a 9 speed cassette. You would also need new shifters and chain if you do so. Add a pair of "skinny street tires" and you'd have a pretty decent "pavement" bike.
Better to use it as is without upgrading. Shifters, chain and cassette are going to cost a around $200, along with the new wheels. That's a lot to sink into a pretty low end bike. Better to get it tuned, ride it as is and save your money for a reward a little later on.

Personally, if you want to work harder, leave the knobbies on at all times. The bike is far less efficient and you have to work harder to keep it rolling down the road. More work = more calories. Speed is fun but at this point you want work
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Old 03-03-08, 06:30 AM
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It will be all pavement. I hope to be able to ride to work once I build up the endurance.
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Old 03-03-08, 08:08 AM
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The endurance will come faster than you think, just keep at it. I'm going to cast my vote with having the old bike tuned. At 270lbs your really not all that heavy, those stock wheels could last you 1000+ miles without hitch provided your avoiding huge potholes and not jumping off curbs. Ride the bike for a few months and see how you take to riding. If you decide it's for you set a goal and reward yourself when you reach it.

Personally I would not be looking for a website just yet. Establish yourself with a local bike shop and get to know the folks there, they'll be the ones to bail you out when you decide to take on a project that gets over your head. Here's a link to a few around you. Enjoy riding, post some pictures and share your adventures with us.

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Old 03-03-08, 08:49 PM
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My 1975 college bike is still on the same rims I laced in 1976. Is there something seriously wrong with them? Rims can last a long time. And the rims on a mtb or hybrid are heavier duty than what I have on my college road bike. I certainly would not put a lot of money (new rims) into a 2001 Giant Boulder. But it is worth a simple tune up, tires, cables, that kind of thing.
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Old 03-03-08, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by melinmi
Need everyone's advice?

I have a 2001 Giant Boulder in good condition. I used it for a couple of years in college and haven't rode since. I am 270 pounds (5'7") - I was only 200 then.

Would it be easier for me to try and retrofat my old Boulder or buy a new bike? I know I will need new rims and tires.

Does anyone have a good website to recommend? I would like to do research on how to retrofat my bike before going to the store.
Best is to take your old bike to a shop for a tuneup, the shop can tell you what is needed, typically tires, tubes, brake pads, possibly some cables and chain. Tires/tubes can rot if left in the damp, brake pads typically will get very hard. Cables can rust inside the housing, and the housings can rust on the inside, making it rough, which makes braking and shifting harder. Chains , when not ridden for a while can seize up, chains are consumables, so if it's seized, replace it. You will probably pay around $100-$150 or so.....

The wheels need to be trued, and the tension checked, but unless you have crashed and damaged a rim, the rims should be OK. If you plan on doing more road riding then off-road, then go with narrower and smoother tires, with the replacements. You can also go with a hybrid type, smoother then a knobby but not slick like a road tire.

You should get a couple of years out of your old bike, without too many problems. If you find yourself doing a lot of road riding over that time, then you can get a road or touring bike, otherwise you can always keep your mountain bike going, replace it or upgrade.

Bikes tend to last quite a while, they are mechanically quite simple, even though they don't always look it, this is why there are guys riding around on bikes from the early 1970's (even though the bikes are over 30 years old), there just isn't that much that can go wrong with a well maintained bicycle. At your weight, I would stay away from the 6' drops, and highly technical trails, but light trail riding, and road riding are certainly possible.
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Old 03-10-08, 07:51 PM
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Thanks for the advice and encouragement. I really appreciate it.

I thought I needed new rims because of my weight. I have my eye on a local bike shop. I will pay them a visit.
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