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So... I'm a Clyde? Maybe someone can help with a question!

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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

So... I'm a Clyde? Maybe someone can help with a question!

Old 04-25-08, 09:52 AM
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So... I'm a Clyde? Maybe someone can help with a question!

Obviously my first post, but I've been on the internet for many years and bikes many more than that. I came to this forum looking for info on electrifying bikes, I never knew there was a term for Clydesdales! Even at my "fighting" weight I'm ~205, so I guess I'm an eternal Clyde. Right now I'm 5'11, ~235 and I'm just getting back to riding, last year was a very low mileage year due to a family move.

I have read the stickies and posting rules.

I've got a number of questions since I just found this forum, but a little background: I've always ridden Cannondales. I've got a '90 3.0 road bike in need of complete rehab and my main ride is an '02 Jekyll full-suspension MTB. I love the bike, but I've always had issue with the rear shock, a Fox Float RL. Even when "locked out," I get a good bit of movement with the shock. This saps a lot of energy when I'm not trail riding.

I do use the bike for some medium difficulty singletrack, but most of the time (now), I'm on paved paths. I have seen a company that modifies Fox shocks to fully lock out travel -- does anyone have any experience with this? What about something fit to replace the shock with a solid piece of aluminum (or some such) to make the bike a quasi-hardtail?

Right now I'm running about 30 miles per week, but increasing rapidly. It's nice to have found this forum!
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Old 04-25-08, 10:52 AM
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I have no knowledge to provide concerning your shock question, but welcome to the forum!
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Old 04-25-08, 11:09 AM
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"Right now I'm running about 30 miles per week"
Do you mean Riding 30 miles?
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Old 04-25-08, 11:23 AM
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Another option to consider might be just to replace the full suspension frame with a hardtail frame. If you keep an eye on the online shops, it's not too hard to find a cheap aluminum or even steel frame for under $250.

It'll solve the rear suspension issue, maybe drop a couple pounds off the bike, and you'll still be able to ride it on the trails.
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Old 04-25-08, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by 10 Wheels
"Right now I'm running about 30 miles per week"
Do you mean Riding 30 miles?
Yeah...

As far as swapping frames, I'm kinda attached to this one, I stripped and polished the frame myself before having a full pro-build done on it. It's a bit of overkill, seeing that I'm almost always pulling my son in a trailer on back, but I do like having the option of going full-out on a singletrack whenever I want. I know a lot of people do hard-core trails with hardtails, but I'm spoiled by the luxury of full suspension.
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Old 04-25-08, 01:59 PM
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At some point the MTB, no matter how you set it up, will become a drag on your riding if you start cranking more miles. Doing too much to make it "roadworthy" will give you a compromised bike both on and off road. The MTB seems to be perfect for your off road excursions so why not get the road bike back in shape? In the long run, you'll be better off putting money there (or if it is too far gone looking for another road bike).

My return to cycling last year was on an old hardtail MTB riding exclusively on the road. Worked great for me for 1,000 miles but as rides got longer I knew it wasn't designed for road use. Switched to road bike and the miles just roll by. And the MTB is still there when I want to hit the trails.
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Old 04-25-08, 06:17 PM
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having 2 bikes is what is needed. i have both and both see enough use to easily justify the purchases.

plus touching that Jekyll would be a crime, which one do you have? even the lowend model is nice, but with the RL the internet is saying you must have the 1000 or up? consider me jealous
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Old 04-25-08, 09:38 PM
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Originally Posted by tremor12
Obviously my first post, but I've been on the internet for many years and bikes many more than that. I came to this forum looking for info on electrifying bikes, I never knew there was a term for Clydesdales! Even at my "fighting" weight I'm ~205, so I guess I'm an eternal Clyde. Right now I'm 5'11, ~235 and I'm just getting back to riding, last year was a very low mileage year due to a family move.

I have read the stickies and posting rules.

I've got a number of questions since I just found this forum, but a little background: I've always ridden Cannondales. I've got a '90 3.0 road bike in need of complete rehab and my main ride is an '02 Jekyll full-suspension MTB. I love the bike, but I've always had issue with the rear shock, a Fox Float RL. Even when "locked out," I get a good bit of movement with the shock. This saps a lot of energy when I'm not trail riding.

I do use the bike for some medium difficulty singletrack, but most of the time (now), I'm on paved paths. I have seen a company that modifies Fox shocks to fully lock out travel -- does anyone have any experience with this? What about something fit to replace the shock with a solid piece of aluminum (or some such) to make the bike a quasi-hardtail?

Right now I'm running about 30 miles per week, but increasing rapidly. It's nice to have found this forum!
Riding the mountain bike on the road, is a little like showing up for a Formula-1 race, driving a hummer. Nothing you do to it, will turn it into a road bike. The real issue though, is you have a road bike, so just refurbish it, and then you have two good bikes, one for the road, and one for the trails. There really isn;t much to refurbishing a bicycle, depends though on what material the frame is, if it's Cro-Mo steel, then it can be cheap, and relatively easy.

First remove all the components, right down to a bare frame, you can strip and refinish the frame if you like, best is if you can get replacement decals from the manufacturer, what a lot of people do now is use a base coat and clear coat finish, you put down the base coat and one layer of clear coat, add the decals, and then a couple more layers of clear coat on top to keep them from getting wrecked. Then start to reassemble, check each component to make sure it's working 100% you can rebuild hubs and the BB, some headsets can be rebuilt as well, use new cables and housings, the old housings can be used as a pattern. Use new brake pads, tires, tubes and bar tape.
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Old 04-25-08, 10:13 PM
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You might get some better options in the MTB forum on this bike, but I agree on the road bike might be a better option. Welcome to the forums.
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