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Must...Learn...To change tires

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Must...Learn...To change tires

Old 06-12-08, 07:47 AM
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Must...Learn...To change tires

So, this morning I woke up around 4, and couldn't go back to sleep. Got up, had some orange juice and a piece of toast, then hopped on the bike around 5:30 to head somewhere for breakfast. Was just planning on going to a place about 2 miles away. Enjoyed a nice pancake breakfast with eggs, read the paper, nice big glass of water, everything was going great.

Decided I'd continue the ride after breakfast and headed just north of Champaign. Coming back into town, I thought it was getting harder to ride. I chalked it up to the headwind that was picking up. About 2 minutes later, I notice the steering's not quite as responsive as it should be. Low and behold, I've got a flat. So, that was after about 8.5 miles on what would have been a nice 12 mile ride. Instead, I was left to hike the last 3.5 because i've been in denial that I'd ever get a flat while actually out riding (I've had 3 priors, but they've all been after the bike's been sitting at home for a few hours).

So, I guess it's time to learn how to change a flat so I can do it on the road. Anyone with any suggestions on a good site to learn would be greatly appreciated. That way a nice early morning ride won't be completely ruined like it was today.
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Old 06-12-08, 07:56 AM
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Heaps of links for you, Best thing to do is practice taking your tire off & back on etc in your garage till you get used to doing it

https://bicycletutor.com/fix-flat-tire/

https://video.google.com/videosearch?...8&sa=N&tab=wv#

https://bicycleuniverse.info/eqp/fixflat.html
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Old 06-12-08, 08:16 AM
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beware, I can't remember if you ride 700c tires, but they can be a real bear to change or fix a flat on....the bead is TIGHT!
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Old 06-12-08, 08:38 AM
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If teaching yourself proves to be a challenge, you might go into the LBS and pay them once to do it and let you watch and learn. Chances are they've got a trick or two.
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Old 06-12-08, 09:03 AM
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Purty easy I think.

Switch gears to the outtermost gears (big ring and smallest in the rear). Easy replacement of the chain.
Use a lever to lift the bead of the tire from the rim. Make sure yo don't pinch the tube or cetain damage. Clip that lever to a spoke so that it holds the bead from the rim. Take a second lever and do the same in a close location to the first lever, should lift the tire off the bead. I run my finger around the remainder of the tire to unseat.

IF I know what cause the flat, I remove the debris. If not, I will inflate the tube so that I can find the trouble spot. A good tip is to line up the label with the valve stem when installing the tire. Makes for easy locating of the debris once you remove the tube. If the tube has a hole at 9'oclock, you know to look at the tire at the 9'oclock location for the debris.

Before replacing the tube, inflate only enough so that the tube takes it's form. Makes it easy to keep the tube in the tire while installing. If not, it's like working with a wet noodle. Install one side of the bead, make sure tube is in place, then begin installing the second bead. Once again make sure the stem is at the label.

Once I have the tire on, I inflate to about 30 psi. I then start at the label, pinch the tire together so that I can see the inside surface of the rim, making sure I haven't caught the tube between the bead and the rim. Also to make sure the bead is seated properly onto the rim. This is certain death if the tube is pinched....I do this for my safety. Have had friends pinch the tubes which creates a bubble on the sidewall resulting in blowing the tire off the rim.

After I inspect the wheel to verify the bead is seated properly, I relplace the wheel onto the bike for inflation. Helps hold the wheel steady. Then I place that small nut (nobody seems to like) onto the valve so that the stem is stable for inflation. I've seen riders go psycho with a pump tearing the stem from the tube while doing roadside repairs.

Make sure the bead is nice and even around the rim/brake sureface area. There is usually a small formed line around the tire bead, give the wheel a spin while keeping you eye on the line. If it looks even all around, it should be fine. If it seems unseated or a large bubble is formed on the sidewall, repeat the process.

When placing the rear wheel, the gears should be lined up and in place. I do this so that I don't forget which gear I was in!


I don't have trouble mounting 700 tires. Some combo's are tough though, I've heard, but brands I don't use. I use Mavic and Velocity rims and Continental tires with no problems. I did have a problem once but it was my fault. I was in a hurry and panicking! I had to stop, take a deep breath then continue with patience!
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Old 06-12-08, 09:22 AM
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See if any shops close by do Clinics on this subject. Our shop does and it is always fun to share your "SECRETS" with customers.
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Old 06-12-08, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
beware, I can't remember if you ride 700c tires, but they can be a real bear to change or fix a flat on....the bead is TIGHT!
Have you ever tried a Kool-Stop Tire Bead Jack With Handle?
I picked one up here https://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...th+Handle.aspx
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Old 06-12-08, 09:51 AM
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+1 on practicing at home. I've damaged a number of tubes getting my act together on 27" and 700c tires. All of the above is good info and I would add carry a spare tube (don't remember seeing that above) so you don't have to patch on the road (unless you get a second flat).

Had my first flat in a long time on my commute last week. Cut the tire so bad it was beyond repair (might have been able to limp it home if I'd carried something to boot it with). I cheated and called my wife for a ride. Wasn't even late to work!
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Old 06-12-08, 10:03 AM
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As others have mentioned, 700c tires can be difficult to change because the bead is so tight. In many cases, you'll break or bend a tire lever before you can get the bead to seat. DAMHIKT! I like the big, yellow, plastic tire levers made by Pedro's. They're thick enough that they won't bend when you go to lever that final section of a cantankerous tire onto the wheel. Buy at least two. Crank Brothers sell a metal lever that looks like it might work well. I haven't tried it, though.

As others have suggested, you should probably practice at home. Buy 2-4 spare tubes before you start! I've found that it's very easy to puncture a tube if you're not careful! Plus then you'll (hopefully) have a spare tube you can carry with you on rides. The only thing worse than a flat tire is sitting on the side of the road with a patch kit trying to find and fix some pinhole leak! Much easier just to throw on a new tube and ride off.

If you don't already have them a pump (I like the Topeak Road Morphy) and an underseat pack (to hold levers, tube, multi-tool, etc) are also requirements for changing tires while out on a ride. I make sure that each bike has a pump, a pack, and the tools necessary to change tires, make minor adjustments, and fix minor problems.

P.S. If you have trouble with tire changing, check around with local bike shops and see if any offer a basic maintenance class. I know that several of the shops in my area offer 1-3 hour classes for $30-60. They'll teach you how to change tires, maintain your chain, adjust cables, and other basic stuff. Ask about the content of the class before you sign up. I know that one particular shop near me charges $30 for a class that's little more than a sales pitch for their over-priced tools and shop services!

Last edited by sstorkel; 06-12-08 at 10:08 AM.
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Old 06-12-08, 02:17 PM
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Get yourself a set up tire levers also, I tried with a screwdriver and monkeyed my wheel before I learned that tools are made for specific purposes and tire levers are the way to go not a screwdriver.
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Old 06-12-08, 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz
A good tip is to line up the label with the valve stem when installing the tire. Makes for easy locating of the debris once you remove the tube. If the tube has a hole at 9'oclock, you know to look at the tire at the 9'oclock location for the debris.
Well dang, ain't that clever? I've never thought to actually be INTENTIONAL about giving myself an easy landmark, so always end up trying to remember where the tire was in relation to the valve, and usually search the whole darn tire. I bet your way works better
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Old 06-12-08, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by ctoddrun
Well dang, ain't that clever? I've never thought to actually be INTENTIONAL about giving myself an easy landmark, so always end up trying to remember where the tire was in relation to the valve, and usually search the whole darn tire. I bet your way works better

I read it in repair and tip manuals. Everything I try to pass on was picked up in the tips department and tested!
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Old 06-12-08, 11:08 PM
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Here is a short video that might help: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5K-DXt9djA
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Old 06-12-08, 11:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
beware, I can't remember if you ride 700c tires, but they can be a real bear to change or fix a flat on....the bead is TIGHT!
Really? I have only found this to be true with brand new tires.
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Old 06-13-08, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
beware, I can't remember if you ride 700c tires, but they can be a real bear to change or fix a flat on....the bead is TIGHT!
Neil F. has a story to tell, from two miles above Frostburg, MD. In the rain. "Natbla" was there for part of it.
 
Old 06-13-08, 07:59 PM
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Push the bead towards the middle of the rim when you start installing the tire, and keep it tightened so it doesn't slip out towards the edge. This will give you a extra millimeter or two of bead flex when you get to the toughest part of slipping the last bit of bead over the rim edge.
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Old 06-13-08, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz
A good tip is to line up the label with the valve stem when installing the tire. Makes for easy locating of the debris once you remove the tube. If the tube has a hole at 9'oclock, you know to look at the tire at the 9'oclock location for the debris.
See and I thought I did this cause I thought I might have a slight case of OCD. .

In the last two weeks I have had way to much practice changing flats on the road.
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Old 06-13-08, 09:23 PM
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Hi Illini,

I am just south of ya near Cdale.

Last Thursday evening (dark) I had a flat about a mile from the house coming in from a 14 mile ride. I carry a tube, tool and Co2 and have never used them. I used my cell instead. I took it to the LBS and the tire was ruined. Relpaced both tires and HD tubes.

This past monday evening I went out and got about 2 miles from home and a really nasty thunderstorm came up so started to head back and "Phffffttttt". Yup! Another one. This one was a piece of glass that sliced my new tire almost an inch It started to rain and hail, so I thought this might not be the best time to do the trial and error change. My wife was not avialable, so I walked home. Man does that mess your average ride speed I now have another new front tire and have added Mr. Tuffies.

I feel your pain.

Take care and say hey to the Cheif for me.

Jay
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Old 06-13-08, 10:08 PM
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How bad off was tube? Maybe no need to do a complete change, just to get home but just repair the tube? Just remove the tube from the tire (no need to remove the tire from bike) patch up the puncture, remove all debris from inside of tire and push tube back in. Air up using your handy pump. Unless it was major damage like jboyd had. Guess I've been lucky so far.
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Old 06-14-08, 06:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Big_e
How bad off was tube? Maybe no need to do a complete change, just to get home but just repair the tube? Just remove the tube from the tire (no need to remove the tire from bike) patch up the puncture, remove all debris from inside of tire and push tube back in. Air up using your handy pump. Unless it was major damage like jboyd had. Guess I've been lucky so far.
Ernest
The reason folks just change the tube, is that it's usually quite a bit faster, flats usually don't happen on bright, sunny afternoons (although my last one, on the road did). They usually happen when it's cold, dark, raining, and your tired and hungry or late getting somewhere. It's easy to just pull out the tube, check the inside of the tire, and put in another tube, then air up, stuff the old tube into a pannier or your saddle bag, and finish the trip. Since tubes are quite cheap, it's easy to keep a few extra around, I keep one spare on each bike, and an extra spare for each bike, in the garage, When I get a flat, I swap the tube for the spare on the bike, the now flat spare goes on a nail in the garage, and I grab a replacement from the shelf. When the shelf is empty, I have a couple on the nail, so I get the patch kit or a new patch kit (stupid glue tubes), and fix the ones on the nail. The next day, I water test the fixed ones, to make sure the hole I found is fixed, and that there are no other holes in the tube. Then I let out the air, roll them up and stuff them into a box or put a rubber band around them, and put them on the shelf. One of the handy things around here, both bikes have the same size wheel, and similar width tires, so they use the same size tubes.
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