Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   Are there any Clyde's riding distance out there? (https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/433730-there-any-clydes-riding-distance-out-there.html)

Neil_B 06-26-08 06:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flip18436572 (Post 6947310)
What do you have for a sandwich? That far into a ride is it provided or do you make your own and keep it cool until you are ready to eat?

I usually eat half of a clif bar about ever 10 to 15 miles if I am going to do a century. I try to keep fueled as I go along.

I find a sandwich usually holds up better than you would think in a pannier or backpack. I also bring a sandwich, usually peanut butter, on a very long ride. Energy gels and many energy bars disagree with my stomach.

Scummer 06-26-08 08:33 AM

Pasta the night before.
2 x Banana's, 2 x PB&J sandwiches, 1 gel and about 5 bottles of water will get me through a century.

But you need the miles first before attempting such a long haul. If you can do 50-70 miles without falling off your bike at the end you're good to go.

I almost fainted at my last century after the ride was over because I didn't eat as much as I should have.
Fueling is the most important thing on a long distance ride.

Tom Stormcrowe 06-26-08 09:03 AM

Yeah, it's easy to fall into a zen zone on the IMS, isn't it, and forget about your body entirely. ;)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scummer (Post 6950027)
Pasta the night before.
2 x Banana's, 2 x PB&J sandwiches, 1 gel and about 5 bottles of water will get me through a century.

But you need the miles first before attempting such a long haul. If you can do 50-70 miles without falling off your bike at the end you're good to go.

I almost fainted at my last century after the ride was over because I didn't eat as much as I should have.
Fueling is the most important thing on a long distance ride.


Neil_B 06-26-08 09:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 6950226)
Yeah, it's easy to fall into a zen zone on the IMS, isn't it, and forget about your body entirely. ;)

I did that on tour, the day after my crash. I was so determined to get to camp, and so distracted by the pain in my side and back, that I didn't eat or drink. I was seriously bonked by the time I reached camp.

Scummer 06-26-08 09:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 6950226)
Yeah, it's easy to fall into a zen zone on the IMS, isn't it, and forget about your body entirely. ;)

Yep. I mean, no distraction by cars, ultra smooth road, small amount of bikers, wide track and my mind set on a 5hr century. I think if I would have fueled better I most likely could have made it in less than 5 hours.
There's always next year *woohooo* :thumb:

Tom Stormcrowe 06-26-08 09:31 AM

Yep, next year for me as well. I want to do it again,but actually finish it this time. My shoulder knocked me out this year. :( I had plenty of gas left in the legs, but couldn't effectively ride because it was massively painful putting any pressure on the shoulder. :(

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scummer (Post 6950354)
Yep. I mean, no distraction by cars, ultra smooth road, small amount of bikers, wide track and my mind set on a 5hr century. I think if I would have fueled better I most likely could have made it in less than 5 hours.
There's always next year *woohooo* :thumb:


Scummer 06-26-08 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 6950420)
Yep, next year for me as well. I want to do it again,but actually finish it this time. My shoulder knocked me out this year. :( I had plenty of gas left in the legs, but couldn't effectively ride because it was massively painful putting any pressure on the shoulder. :(

Your shoulder will get better. Just make sure you give it enough rest.

Tom Stormcrowe 06-26-08 09:45 AM

Yeah, I know. It's just time. ;) I'm keeping the rides to 20 or less right now.....no discomfort at that level. ;)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scummer (Post 6950491)
Your shoulder will get better. Just make sure you give it enough rest.


Hill-Pumper 06-27-08 08:18 AM

Thank you everyone for the information !!! I plan on doing a longer ride this weekend and pushing myself a little longer. My current mountain bike with knobbys is not the best thing for road rides, but it will do until I get my road bike. Hopefully, next week I will be picking that up. I have decided to go with a Giant OCR A1 from a LBS. The shop owner is a serious roadie that races plus does centuries, so he knows what I am looking for in a bike. Also, his fitting sessions are about 2 hours long, and I have talked to someone who has used him before that said he really is good. Anyway, thanks again for the information and the welcome. I may fill you in on my longer ride as long as I don't bonk and can get my hand up to the keyboard. :lol:

gus69 06-27-08 08:31 AM

I ride long distance. 2,3,4 and 600 km rides and brevets.
It's all about the training and having the time to do it.

Keep well hydrated and eat a little but often while riding.
Remember you need more food and water than a 75 kg rider.

10 Wheels 06-27-08 07:29 PM

Broken Spoke
 
92.3 miles today in 90* Heat. (327 miles so far for the week, One more day to ride)
Mile 35, heard a loud PING from the front wheel, then cling cling. Stopped.
One broken front spoke. Broke off inside the nipple.
My friend Dave used Kevlar String to make a spoke which allowed the whele to be trued.
Finished the last 60 miles with this:

http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/h.../TempSpoke.jpg

neilfein 06-28-08 12:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Historian (Post 6950291)
I did that on tour, the day after my crash. I was so determined to get to camp, and so distracted by the pain in my side and back, that I didn't eat or drink. I was seriously bonked by the time I reached camp.

Neil's not kidding. He was too tired to wait 5 minutes for me to get the food cooked. Above all, don't get hungry or thirsty on a ride.

jupiterboy 06-28-08 05:10 PM

I am a clyde and I have rode multiple Double Centuries, Double Metrics, and centuries.

If you train on a regular basis - make sure you can comfortably ride over 50% of the long distance. For the Double Centuries, I would train for 100 miles +.

Start the ride early - I always get on the road 30 to 60 minutes before everyone else.

Eat when you can, drink fluids every 15 minutes (or when you can remember), and don't hang out too long at rest stops.

Good luck. Happy riding

Ranger63 06-30-08 06:21 PM

Normal Rides
 
45-60 miles/day on weekends and a 3- 30 milers during the week.
The club I'm with increases the miles on weekend rides over the course of the summer.

lubers 06-30-08 08:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hill-Pumper (Post 6944266)
First of all, I am glad that I found this part of the forum, even though I am at the bottom of the Clyde scale at 5'9", 202 pounds, I feel more comfortable talking to you guys then the rail skinny people. So, my question here is are any of you participating in things like century rides or anything like that. I have always done "sprinter" type sports (football,wrestling, track) when I was younger, just because that was what my stocky body type seem to dictate. Now, I want to try and do more endurance type riding because I think that I would enjoy it more then getting into things like racing at this point in my like. So for those doing the distance riding, what issues have you had, or what kind of preparations did you have to do?

I just finished a six day ride last week, we averaged about 65 miles per day, I usually have about six to seven hundred miles before I go on a tour but this year I only had about three hundred. First three days were hard with the second day being seventy five miles of one hill after another and into a ten to fifteen mile an hour wind. The rest of the week was with the wind and was great. I go 6'2 and now at 265 down from 286 before I started riding again this year. I have done a couple of centuries last year and I am planing to do one again next month for a local charity ride. I think the most improtant thing about distance riding is finding a saddle that will take your butt all the way without hurting. I had the good fortune of testing out the Brooks and found it to be just fine on the tour. I would recommend Brooks to anyone for a long distance ride, I also have the Titanico LD which I let another person use on the ride, he stated it was the first time he went on tour and did not have a sore butt, and now he won't give it back. I have since ordered another one (which he paid for) and it will go back on my touring bike. The Brooks will go on my every day commuter.

noteon 06-30-08 08:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lubers (Post 6977053)
I would recommend Brooks to anyone for a long distance ride

Seconded. I've never been as comfortable at mile 90 as I was on a 3-day-old B17 that had just been Proofided for the first time that morning.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:16 PM.