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Riding the Bike Leg in a Triathlon advice sought

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Riding the Bike Leg in a Triathlon advice sought

Old 08-24-08, 02:28 PM
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squirrell
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Riding the Bike Leg in a Triathlon advice sought

I've put together a team of 3 to do this local Triathlon--I'm doing the bike leg, which is 15 miles. No problem on the distance--that's a short ride for me. Our swimmer is older than me and is also just doing it fun. Our runner is her 22 year old son, who will probably be the "fast" one of the team.

I'm not trying to win this Triathlon (obviously--that's impossible) but would like to make a somewhat decent showing on my leg of it.

I know there is a difference in riding/training for a Triathlon and riding/training for long distances like a Century, which I 've been doing up till now. My last 2 rides, I've done shorter distances but really upped my efforts, keeping my HR in the upper level of "fat burning" or above. The road slicks I just put on the Hybrid have really helped with the speed.

But I was just wondering if anyone has some pointers? Training tips?
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Old 08-24-08, 02:55 PM
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Push, manage your HR, and have fun! The Tri world is different from road racing, in that your competitors will be friendly and supportive.
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Old 08-24-08, 03:50 PM
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Pedal like hell.

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Old 08-24-08, 04:00 PM
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The only good race pace is suicide pace, and today looks like a good day to die.-Steven Roland Prefontaine

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“To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift.”
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Old 08-24-08, 04:01 PM
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I would think that using a road bike instead of hybrid would boost your speed some.
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Old 08-24-08, 04:14 PM
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Pump the tires a few PSI over max!
What kind of terrain? Flat pavement, hills, dirt, stumps??
Without knowing what bike you have, maybe a cassette change would help? Having the largest cog no larger than then the absolute minimum, will allow closer spaced gears in your "cruising" range. That allows you to have a better chance at using the "optimal" gear, instead of one that's either a bit too low or a bit too high. IOW, it allows the "engine" to run at its optimal speed.

How much are you willing to spend?
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Old 08-24-08, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
Pump the tires a few PSI over max!
What kind of terrain? Flat pavement, hills, dirt, stumps??
Without knowing what bike you have, maybe a cassette change would help? Having the largest cog no larger than then the absolute minimum, will allow closer spaced gears in your "cruising" range. That allows you to have a better chance at using the "optimal" gear, instead of one that's either a bit too low or a bit too high. IOW, it allows the "engine" to run at its optimal speed.

How much are you willing to spend?
Not wanting to/can't afford to spend anything--which is why I put slicks on the Hybrid instead of buying a road bike now. That way, I get a little more speed and can take my time getting a good deal on a bike.

Flat, flat, flat, roads--pavement or what passes for it here. Using a Hybrid.

With the training, is it "simply" a matter of riding the same distance as the race as fast as I can? Or should I use intervals during my longer rides?

Like I said, not looking to win but would like to hold my head up at the end. This is something that I'm doing also to prove to myself that I can do it--compete in something like this and not fail miserably. Six months ago, this would have been unthinkable for me, so this is a big accomplishment that I can hold up, remember, and use a motivation to keep up my weight loss and my riding.
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Old 08-24-08, 04:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe View Post

“To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift.”

I absolutely love this quote! Now I've got to go find out more about this guy.
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Old 08-24-08, 11:27 PM
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I just did the bike portion of a triathlon relay this morning. It was the second one we've done, and they are very enjoyable! I'm not sure you want speed tips from the likes of me though! :-)

I would say to try to hold back some in the first 5 miles. Your adrenaline will be pumping and you might tend to go out too hard and run out of gas early. Push the last five to the point of almost throwing up.

Put some clip on aerobars on your hybrid. Get comfortable riding with them before the race. The aerobars should be the biggest time saver you could add to the bike.

When I was riding my hybrid, I went from 80 psi 700x40's to 120 psi 700x28's (Serfas Seca) and picked up probably 0.5 mph average.

Enjoy the race! My triathlon relay experiences have been great! The people are wonderful and supportive. My team is far from competitive, but we have fun and the competition to us is just trying to perform at our best and trying to improve. I have much respect to the athletes who perform all three events, but I'm sticking to the cycling only!
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Old 08-25-08, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by squirrell View Post
I absolutely love this quote! Now I've got to go find out more about this guy.
Here is a starting point for more information on Steve Prefontaine.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Prefontaine
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Old 08-25-08, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by landshark1 View Post
I would say to try to hold back some in the first 5 miles. Your adrenaline will be pumping and you might tend to go out too hard and run out of gas early. Push the last five to the point of almost throwing up.

!
Umm, yeah, ok...

Thanks for all the tips y'all! I know I've got to build up my stamina a lot it seems.
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Old 08-25-08, 02:09 PM
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Save 2 units of red blood cells and re-infuse them the day of the race. That's what the pros do.
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Old 08-25-08, 02:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Richard_Rides View Post
Save 2 units of red blood cells and re-infuse them the day of the race. That's what the pros do.
Seriously? Good gosh, how much money is at stake for them to do something like that?
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Old 08-25-08, 03:27 PM
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This is what's called "Doping". It's been around for decades. Athletes have their blood drawn and spun in a centrifuge, the red cells are put in a 'fridge and the plasma goes back in the body. Then before the race they transfuse them selves with their own red blood cells, which gives them a big advantage.

These days athletes take a product called EPO. EPO increases your red blood cell production. EPO is made by Amgen as in Amgen Tour Of California bike race. EPO is given to cancer patients. Anybody know any cancer patients who have won the TdF 7 times?

The percentage of your blood that contains red blood cells is called your hematocrit. My hematocrit is 44 or 44% red blood cells. Bike racers are allowed to have a hematocrit of 50.

A bicycle racer's shelf life is very short. Most professional bike racers make around $50,000 a year. There are about 400 members of the pro peloton world wide. A few become multi-millionaires. Most go back to their jobs as meat cutters and construction workers. Professional cyclists will do anything to succeed. Anything.
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Old 08-25-08, 06:24 PM
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What bike do you have?
IF you do only flat land riding, a cassette change is probably something you'd want to do anyway for all your riding.
Probably $20-40, depending on how many cogs you have.
IF you currently have something like an X-30+, you have a bunch of low gears that you never use, at the expense of NOT having gears you can use. something like a 12-23 allows you to shift in smaller increments to adjust for slight changes in the wind, while cruising along. This allows you to keep your cadence in the best range for you. You keep the motor running at its peak efficiency/power, just like a semi truck hauling down the highway.
CADENCE is the KEY, You want to spin the fastest you can comfortably no matter what the speedometer says. Your endurance will thank you. Mashing sucks energy fast.
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Old 08-25-08, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
What bike do you have?
IF you do only flat land riding, a cassette change is probably something you'd want to do anyway for all your riding.
Probably $20-40, depending on how many cogs you have.
IF you currently have something like an X-30+, you have a bunch of low gears that you never use, at the expense of NOT having gears you can use. something like a 12-23 allows you to shift in smaller increments to adjust for slight changes in the wind, while cruising along. This allows you to keep your cadence in the best range for you. You keep the motor running at its peak efficiency/power, just like a semi truck hauling down the highway.
CADENCE is the KEY, You want to spin the fastest you can comfortably no matter what the speedometer says. Your endurance will thank you. Mashing sucks energy fast.

Thanks, hadn't thought of that or even knew it was possible to do. I know that I never use my lowest 5 gears and since I've gotten the road slicks, I've been able to spin in the upper gears fairly easy. I might just look into that!
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Old 08-26-08, 10:47 AM
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Start strong, stay strong through the middle and finish strong.

If you have time to practice start pushing youself to find your 15 mile pace. If you really want to race you should be spent at 15 miles. So keep pushing yourself harder and harder until you find a pace where you can finish the 15 miles as fast as possible. Practice that pace and hold to it durring the race.
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