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Clyde compatible aero or low spoke count wheels?

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Clyde compatible aero or low spoke count wheels?

Old 02-25-09, 08:27 PM
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Clyde compatible aero or low spoke count wheels?

Platypus' recent questioning of the necessity for 36, 14ga, etc wheels has me wondering if technology has caught up with clyde requirements? I settled on my wheel choice too many years ago, after having had numerous failures on wheels that "I wanted to fit on". I'm once again considering a venture down that path of light and sexy wheels. So, my question to fellow clydes is, what low spoke count or aero wheels have you had significant experience with both positive and negative. I'm hoping that with enough respondents we'll see a patern of what really works and what doesn't. I'm sure that some of you have had no problems with some impressively light equipment and that others will have horror stories with even the most stout of hoops. In order to keep things in perspective please give us some realative info to put things in context: wheel model, weight(the wheels), spoke count and pattern, your weight, riding style, miles accumulated on them.

So far I've leaning toward Mavic Aksium's but have also looked at Eastons, American Classics, Zipp's(which I can't afford), etc. Does anyone have experience with Rolf Prima wheels, specifically their Tandem wheels? Are there other good options that I've missed?

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Old 02-25-09, 11:07 PM
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Not the Rolf, but I did own and ride a set of the Bontrager Race Lite low spokes for a while. Never had any issues with them, just never felt comfortable on them, I was nervous do to the low spoke count, but they were nice wheels. I sold them to another clyde and he loves them.
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Old 02-25-09, 11:44 PM
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I have about 1500 miles on a set of Neuvation M28 Aero2 wheels. They cost $200, 16/20 aero spokes, and a claimed weight of (I think) 1750 grams. I did not elect to upgrade to the ceramic bearing. I bought them when I weighed 210-220lbs, though I rapidly dropped to around 200lbs once I started riding regularly. Most of my riding is done on roads that are in decent shape, but it took me a while to remember how to bunny hop so the wheels have run into quite a few driveway lips and other pavement imperfections at 15+mph. Have to admit, I was a bit nervous about the low spoke count but the wheels were true and well-tensioned out of the box and have been trouble-free so far. The first few rides with heavy cross-winds were a bit of an eye-opener. The wheels haven't required any maintenance to date...

When I bought my Cervelo RS, I also grabbed a set of Easton EA90 SL wheels. Got them via the live.com cashback program and I think the net cost was around $390. 24/28 spokes and a claimed weight of around 1550g. Like the Neuvations, they were true and properly tensioned out of the box. Hubs spun a bit better out of the box than the Neuvations, but they make more noise when coasting than the Neuvations (which are nearly silent). Only have 400-500 miles on them so far. The Easton's feel like they're a bit more stiff than the Neuvations. Climbing seems like it might be a bit easier with the EA90s, but honestly I don't have any hard data to back that up. They definitely look better than the Neuvations, though
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Old 02-26-09, 04:48 AM
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I suggest that people post their weight (like SStorkel) when contributing to this thread, lest an uberclyde end up riding on rims fit for us mini-clydes (my weight=225ish). My experience is limited but I suppose I should put in a good word for the ubiquitous Mavic Open Pro/Ultegra combination, which I hold in very high regard- light but not low-spoke and sexy, I know. I also have Bontrager Race Lites that I rarely ride and do not trust because they feel flexy.

Not to redirect the thread, but do not forget the "tire factor" in the lust for speed. I recently changed from a set of 700x23 Armadillos to Conti Gatorskins (folders) and oh la la... I am a pro... with a tailwind of course!
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Old 02-26-09, 04:58 AM
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Cane Creek made a nice Clyde friendly wheel called the Volos XL.. It was 24F / 28R - 30mm deep disk aero wheel that was a nice set of wheels and was made for clydes.. Unfortunately Cane Creek stop selling wheels last year.. You can find a few places online that still sell them.. I bought 2 sets when I found out they were going to stop selling wheels.. They still support users of the wheels today..

see reviews here: https://www.roadbikereview.com/cat/wh...0_2490crx.aspx

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Old 02-26-09, 07:11 AM
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I ride a Jamis Quest with Mavic Aksiums and have had zero trouble. I've only got about 1000 miles on the bike (got it in October) but the wheels are as true as can be. I'm about 210. I guess I was a little concerned about the spoke count, but I've read elsewhere that the Aksium is a pretty bombproof wheel, and it's pretty darn cheap too.
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Old 03-03-09, 08:18 PM
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Just saw this set on ebay.. Solid Clyde Friendly wheelset.. I own 2 sets of them at 240lbs... I would buy this set if I hadn't changed all my road bikes to Campy 10..

https://cgi.ebay.com/Cane-Creek-Wheel...QQcmdZViewItem
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Old 03-03-09, 09:12 PM
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I ride the stock wheels my bike came with my Fuji
https://www.aclass-wheels.com/road_alx200.html

almost 2000grams but i guess that adds to the durability (at least that is what i tell myself) but 20/24 spokes

i weight between 215 and 235 depending on the time of year 23c tires ultras first the gatorskins

I expected them to suck but no problems so far (about 1500 miles) but not much to brag about either.

I am eying these guys up https://www.bikesoul.com/s4.html less weight and more aero, I hope durable
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Old 03-03-09, 09:45 PM
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Originally Posted by socalrider
Cane Creek made a nice Clyde friendly wheel called the Volos XL.. It was 24F / 28R - 30mm deep disk aero wheel that was a nice set of wheels and was made for clydes.. Unfortunately Cane Creek stop selling wheels last year.. You can find a few places online that still sell them.. I bought 2 sets when I found out they were going to stop selling wheels.. They still support users of the wheels today..

see reviews here: https://www.roadbikereview.com/cat/wh...0_2490crx.aspx
+1 -- bought a set when Nashbar was closing them out. I was 230 at the time now around 215. About 1500 miles on them and straight as new. 5 of 5 Clydesdales.

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Old 03-03-09, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by heckler
I ride the stock wheels my bike came with my Fuji
https://www.aclass-wheels.com/road_alx200.html

almost 2000grams but i guess that adds to the durability (at least that is what i tell myself) but 20/24 spokes

i weight between 215 and 235 depending on the time of year 23c tires ultras first the gatorskins

I expected them to suck but no problems so far (about 1500 miles) but not much to brag about either.

I am eying these guys up https://www.bikesoul.com/s4.html less weight and more aero, I hope durable

I have a set of the 270s (pretty similar I think - Radial 20F/2X - 24R blade spokes) that I bought the Cane Creeks to replace. I replaced them because after repacking the rear hub about a dozen times and replacing cones / bearings twice I still couldn't get rid of a mystery tick. Of course as soon as I bought the Cane Creeks I was hammering up a hill and there was a weird scrunch (from the 270s) -- they've been quiet ever since!! Holding up pretty well on my rain bike -- I just trued them for the first time this past weekend. Around the same miles on them as the Cane Creeks (~1500), but I ride them on the MUP -- has some rough areas, a couple wooden bridges and a railroad crossing. I give them 4 out of 5 Clydesdales.

AClass 270s

I think the AClass "handbuild" Alex rims may be almost decent, but would not wish the lesser ones on anybody. My wifes GT came with a set of Alex R500s. They were crap right out of the box. Out of true in every sense of the word. Our LBS has pretty much given up truing them for me. I bought her a new set and we will use the rear R500 for trainer duty.
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Old 03-03-09, 11:48 PM
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Another vote for the Neuvations M28 - about 10k miles on mine, and hard miles at that. My weight bounces between 200 and 225. I did break a spoke once, though, and was not able to get the wheel true enough to ride it home - I think this would be a problem for any low spoke count wheel. Once the spoke was replaced, and everything was de-tensioned and re-tensioned it came right back into true, though, and no problems since.

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Old 03-04-09, 03:41 AM
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I must comment on the Neuvaion M28 wheels. I bought a new road bike summer before last and replaced the stock wheels immediately with the neuvation 28 wheels. I was using Pro Race 2 tires, 23 MM. At about 6 months, which amounted to 2500 miles. the rear wheel hub broke, resulting in a fairly long walk back. This wheel was replaced by the factory. Four months later along with 2000 estimated miles, once again, the rear wheel hub broke.
I ride at 235 pounds. Most of my rides are on the highways and some MUP. Not difficult conditiions.
The ride was OK with these wheels, but I gave up on them after the second long walk back.
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Old 03-04-09, 05:02 AM
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Originally Posted by billydonn
I suggest that people post their weight (like SStorkel) when contributing to this thread, lest an uberclyde end up riding on rims fit for us mini-clydes (my weight=225ish). My experience is limited but I suppose I should put in a good word for the ubiquitous Mavic Open Pro/Ultegra combination, which I hold in very high regard- light but not low-spoke and sexy, I know. I also have Bontrager Race Lites that I rarely ride and do not trust because they feel flexy.

Not to redirect the thread, but do not forget the "tire factor" in the lust for speed. I recently changed from a set of 700x23 Armadillos to Conti Gatorskins (folders) and oh la la... I am a pro... with a tailwind of course!
You guys are in the weights I aspire to. There's a huge difference between barely over 200lbs and 270lbs in what kind of wheels are needed. I recently sold my Bontrager Race lites to a skinny guy and changed to 36 spoke Mavic Open Pro with Chris King Hubs cause I got tired of needing to true my wheels after every bump.
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Old 03-04-09, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by bigfred

Percheron Fred
I used to own a Percheron, he was a great horse.
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Old 03-04-09, 08:19 AM
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I have a set of Bontrager Race Lite wheels with 20/24 spoke count. I am 200lbs, but I just found that my rear wheel is completely out of dish after I replaced it a with DT swiss 1.1 and a PowerTap hub.
No spoke failure yet, but the wheel going out of dish is concerning about the longetivity of them.
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Old 03-04-09, 08:31 AM
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I know once I post this I am doomed with the spoke breakage gods...but I have Velocity Deep V rims 28 hole, gone from 270ish to 370 ish now 321 no broken spokes and still true. Currently I have ~2300 miles on them. MUP mostly some roads hit quite a few mini-pot holes. Maybe not as light and sexy as you want but a great rim for me.
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Old 03-04-09, 09:43 AM
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I like the appearance of Mavic Kysrium SL wheels - black rims and spokes with red anodized hubs and single "signature" red spoke.

I put a set of these on my Specialized Roubaix after the rear rim on the Shimano 5600 wheel cracked for the second time (both times I got warranty replacement). The difference in performance was huge. These are very stiff wheels. I gave them an unplanned strength test when I T-boned a pair of 400 lb wild boars that crossed my path in full gallop at night while I was traveling at 18 mph. The bike flew up in air and landed hard on the saddle while I landed on my left hip and tailbone. The front wheel was completely unscathed and still true and round! I had the local shop examine the wheels for damage and they could not find anything.

I later bought a Cervelo R3 and moved the wheels to this bike. I have 3500 miles on the wheels and have done nothing to them. My weight ranges from 228-238.

Bob
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Old 03-04-09, 06:29 PM
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Originally Posted by bigfred
Platypus' recent questioning of the necessity for 36, 14ga, etc wheels has me wondering if technology has caught up with clyde requirements? I settled on my wheel choice too many years ago, after having had numerous failures on wheels that "I wanted to fit on". I'm once again considering a venture down that path of light and sexy wheels. So, my question to fellow clydes is, what low spoke count or aero wheels have you had significant experience with both positive and negative. I'm hoping that with enough respondents we'll see a patern of what really works and what doesn't. I'm sure that some of you have had no problems with some impressively light equipment and that others will have horror stories with even the most stout of hoops. In order to keep things in perspective please give us some realative info to put things in context: wheel model, weight(the wheels), spoke count and pattern, your weight, riding style, miles accumulated on them.

So far I've leaning toward Mavic Aksium's but have also looked at Eastons, American Classics, Zipp's(which I can't afford), etc. Does anyone have experience with Rolf Prima wheels, specifically their Tandem wheels? Are there other good options that I've missed?

Percheron Fred
Basic metalurgy on bicycle wheels hasn't really changed since to move from Chromed steel rims to AL alloy rims which began over 50 years ago. It all comes down to integrity of the wheel. With the spokes at proper tension an amazing amount of stress (weight) can be placed on the wheel without causing problems. When you have one or more spokes at below proper tension, then as the wheel goes around it flexes, and what happens when you take a piece of steel wire and flex it repeatedly, it breaks. This is the point where spoke count comes into play. With a large number (32 or 36) spokes, the stresses are spread over the neighbouring spokes, which are nowhere near their maximum stress level and the wheel holds it's basic shape. With a smaller number of spokes, say 20, the neighbouring spokes are much further away, and much closer to their maximum stress level, and the rim bends out of shape, your super expensive low spoke count wheel now looks like a taco shell. Often this means needing to replace it.

Low spoke count wheels can work, and can work quite well for a clyde, but they must be properly tensioned, and they must be checked for tension on a regular basis, the wheel must be built, tensioned and checked for tension by a good wheel builder, who is familiar with building wheels for heavier riders. If there is such a wheel builder local to you, then it may be quite reasonable to make use of their services, if you have to ship the wheels a long distance, it may not be worth the effort or expense. Don't be surprised though if the wheel builder doesn't recommend the same kind of wheel as you find folks recommend around here.
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Old 03-05-09, 03:18 PM
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The Vigor Tandems are a non-starter, as they are only available in 145mm spacing. So, Rolfs' choices would be Echelon or Vigor RS. I've found neither to be locally available. My wife has a set of older Rolfs and I'm waffling about the matched spoke idea. Any Bontragers would be closely related to Rolfs.

Locally available so far:

Mavic Aksium- not that light, are they that much more durable than the Ksyriums?

Mavic Ksyrium Equipe- lighter, 18/20 spoking

Bontrager Racelite- I just can't trust Bontrager, it's a personal thing, I've just never thought they made great stuff

Eastons all flavors- Any more of you have experience with these? Specially, if you have also ridden on Mavics?

It's sorta looking like a choice between Mavics or Eastons for me.



Originally Posted by socalrider
Cane Creek made a nice Clyde friendly wheel called the Volos XL.. It was 24F / 28R - 30mm deep disk aero wheel that was a nice set of wheels and was made for clydes.. Unfortunately Cane Creek stop selling wheels last year.. You can find a few places online that still sell them.. I bought 2 sets when I found out they were going to stop selling wheels.. They still support users of the wheels today..

see reviews here: https://www.roadbikereview.com/cat/wh...0_2490crx.aspx
The Volos XLs look interesting and can be found affordably. But, I'm ruling them out personally. Just because it looks as though Cane Creek has abandoned road wheels completely and I'm interested in buying something that will have on going support, should I need rims, hubs or spokes.

Originally Posted by BikeArkansas
I must comment on the Neuvaion M28 wheels. I bought a new road bike summer before last and replaced the stock wheels immediately with the neuvation 28 wheels. I was using Pro Race 2 tires, 23 MM. At about 6 months, which amounted to 2500 miles. the rear wheel hub broke, resulting in a fairly long walk back. This wheel was replaced by the factory. Four months later along with 2000 estimated miles, once again, the rear wheel hub broke.
I ride at 235 pounds. Most of my rides are on the highways and some MUP. Not difficult conditiions.
The ride was OK with these wheels, but I gave up on them after the second long walk back.
The neuvations just sound too hit or miss. And that, from rides 30-70 lbs lighter than myself. I would like to give my personal experiment the best chance of success and feel that is to buy a wheelset that has a reputation for consistancy.

Originally Posted by RedC
You guys are in the weights I aspire to. There's a huge difference between barely over 200lbs and 270lbs in what kind of wheels are needed. I recently sold my Bontrager Race lites to a skinny guy and changed to 36 spoke Mavic Open Pro with Chris King Hubs cause I got tired of needing to true my wheels after every bump.
You've got it correct with regard to weights. I really want to trust that: of Bontrager, Rolf Vector, Rolf Prima(which all share the same matched spoke technology) the Prima's should have the best possibility of success but I'm not convinced. I would be willing to use them as the test subject if they were available locally.

Originally Posted by Richard_Rides
I used to own a Percheron, he was a great horse.
A classmate's mother used to breed them. Incredible power!

Originally Posted by Wogsterca
Basic metalurgy on bicycle wheels hasn't really changed since to move from Chromed steel rims to AL alloy rims which began over 50 years ago. It all comes down to integrity of the wheel. With the spokes at proper tension an amazing amount of stress (weight) can be placed on the wheel without causing problems. When you have one or more spokes at below proper tension, then as the wheel goes around it flexes, and what happens when you take a piece of steel wire and flex it repeatedly, it breaks. This is the point where spoke count comes into play. With a large number (32 or 36) spokes, the stresses are spread over the neighbouring spokes, which are nowhere near their maximum stress level and the wheel holds it's basic shape. With a smaller number of spokes, say 20, the neighbouring spokes are much further away, and much closer to their maximum stress level, and the rim bends out of shape, your super expensive low spoke count wheel now looks like a taco shell. Often this means needing to replace it.

Low spoke count wheels can work, and can work quite well for a clyde, but they must be properly tensioned, and they must be checked for tension on a regular basis, the wheel must be built, tensioned and checked for tension by a good wheel builder, who is familiar with building wheels for heavier riders. If there is such a wheel builder local to you, then it may be quite reasonable to make use of their services, if you have to ship the wheels a long distance, it may not be worth the effort or expense. Don't be surprised though if the wheel builder doesn't recommend the same kind of wheel as you find folks recommend around here.
Basic metalurgy hasn't changed, but it's application has. We have far greater control over distribution and shaping than was available a few years ago and much better ability to model the stress distribution. Combined, these should result in stronger, lighter more reliable products being available. I believe the current market choices support this. Thanks for the reminder about the basics of wheel integrity. I'm not forgetting that my choice to move onto a lower spoke count wheel may/will result in additional maintenance concerns. I settled on 36spoke, Open Pros and Ultegra hubs over ten years ago and have ridden through a couple sets since. I'm tired of the stagnation and feel like giving the newer technology a chance. Yes, I'll make sure they're properly tensioned, just as I do my current wheels. Don't worry, I'm only partly dillusional about the possible success of this, I've been road riding (good lord this makes me feel old) 27 years. I'm very currious what difference you think there may be between what a local wheelsmith may recommend and the wheels we're discussing on this forum? The only option I haven't yet seriously considered is hand building some aftermarket hubs to CXP33's or the like, with low count aero spokes.
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Old 03-05-09, 04:18 PM
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Originally Posted by bigfred
The Volos XLs look interesting and can be found affordably. But, I'm ruling them out personally. Just because it looks as though Cane Creek has abandoned road wheels completely and I'm interested in buying something that will have on going support, should I need rims, hubs or spokes.
Cane Creek still supports the wheels 100%.. If you have any problems they will take care of them. This was one wheel that was specifically for clydes.. Not many vendors even take people over 170lbs into consideration when building any product today.
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Old 03-05-09, 04:22 PM
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Any low spoke count wheel would be no good. I'm 205 lbs and I've destroyed Mavic Ksyriums (SSC SLs and Elites) and Neuvation M28s. Granted, I was up to 232 at the time but the same can be said for now. To Neuvations credit, I did get 8,000 miles out of the first set before a rear spoke broke. My Ksyrium SSCs made it to around 6,000 and the Elites a little over 5,000 before spokes started breaking. It took a couple of weeks to get replacement spokes for the Mavics however. Eventhough it was past the warranty period, Neuvation replaced it (with the Aero 2) immediately. The second time set of wheels, the rear hub broke on. Neuvation gave me another set (Aero 3) with a stronger hub. Those wheels took some serious abuse and being that I was a big chain ring guy they held up nicely for a 20 spoke rear wheel. This third set (the Aero 3) has a pretty beefy looking hub and I've had no problems with them. However, I now have a set of Velocity Deep Vs that I ride on more. The Deep Vs dont spin as well and you can feel the weight difference, but I can probably ride them off of a cliff and still ride home on them. That's a bit extreme I guess but they are that durable. Not only are they stronger than strong but they are 30 mm deep rims- so yes they are aero enough. If these wheels cost more than you're willing to spin, a set of Deep Vs built by Velocity are available on their website. You'll get a 24 spoke front/32 rear with 14g spokes and Velocity hubs for around $300. Don't let pre-built prices fool you. I ordered a pair and let me tell you, they were built after I ordered them. They even have sticker with the build date and builder's initials on the inside of the rims. I received mine on 9/19/2008 and they were built on 9/17/2008. I ordered them on 9/12/2008. Anyway, they are still cool looking and durable-even if they aren't lightweight. The Neuvation M28 Aero3 are more attractive but they do have a 16 front/20 rear spoke set up.
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Old 03-05-09, 04:52 PM
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Here's a quote from Peter White Cycles (he knows wheels) that might be appropriate here:

Let's be very clear about something. Rims for racing bikes, such as the Mavic Open Pro and Velocity Aerohead, are made for people who use bicycles in races. That's why they're called racing bikes; because people actually race with them! To be a competitive road racer, you will not want to weigh much more than about 160 lbs. Even at that weight, you'll find yourself at a significant disadvantage in many road races, at least those with any hills. Since the manufacturers of racing rims are aware of this fact, they don't bother making these rims strong enough for 230 lb cyclists, regardless of whether those 230 lb cyclists have the curious notion that it would be a good idea to ride a bike with "racing rims" and 23mm tires.

Remember, reality is what it is, regardless of what you read in the cycling magazines.

So, when you call and tell me you weigh as much as the typical NFL running back and you're just tickled pink with your Campy Record 10 speed equipped bike but you want a set of wheels that are light weight and "bomb proof" (I love that one!) don't be surprised when I suggest you go on a diet and call me back in a few years. I'm not writing this because I don't want your business, it's because I hate feeding on misconceptions spread by the marketing departments of various cycling companies and the moronic magazine scribes.
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Old 03-05-09, 05:42 PM
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Originally Posted by dizzy101
Here's a quote from Peter White Cycles (he knows wheels) that might be appropriate here:
I've read that quote before too, and with all due respect to Mr. White I just don't buy it. Just in this thread there are several people that have had success with race-y wheels, and in this forum there are plenty of folks riding high-zoot wheels with little trouble. He says Open Pros are only for racers?

I respect his experience, and maybe I'd have a different opinion if I were in the business of building (and warrantying) wheels, but a well-built and properly tensioned and maintained wheel can work for people over race weight, even without 36 spokes.

Some common sense is required... if you weigh 300 lb you probably shouldn't plunk down the cash for Zipps, but a 200 lb dude can ride Mavics without some sort of atomic blast taking out the whole town. Well maybe except for R SYS...
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Old 03-05-09, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by socalrider
Cane Creek still supports the wheels 100%.. If you have any problems they will take care of them. This was one wheel that was specifically for clydes.. Not many vendors even take people over 170lbs into consideration when building any product today.
I respect Cane Creeks customer service. While I don't own any of their wheels, I have a couple of their headsets and other bits of their's about my bikes. I appreciate that the Volo XL's are aimed at folks like us. I should have added more than just, there may not be parts. Given their lack of local availability, the fact that I would like to be able to replace the product in the future if all goes well and the fact that Cane Creek has quit making road wheels, I'm (personally) not going consider them. If I were still living in the states and looking for a quick and affordable wheelset, it might be different.

Originally Posted by terbennett
Any low spoke count wheel would be no good. I'm 205 lbs and I've destroyed Mavic Ksyriums (SSC SLs and Elites) and Neuvation M28s. Granted, I was up to 232 at the time but the same can be said for now. To Neuvations credit, I did get 8,000 miles out of the first set before a rear spoke broke. My Ksyrium SSCs made it to around 6,000 and the Elites a little over 5,000 before spokes started breaking. It took a couple of weeks to get replacement spokes for the Mavics however. Eventhough it was past the warranty period, Neuvation replaced it (with the Aero 2) immediately. The second time set of wheels, the rear hub broke on. Neuvation gave me another set (Aero 3) with a stronger hub. Those wheels took some serious abuse and being that I was a big chain ring guy they held up nicely for a 20 spoke rear wheel. This third set (the Aero 3) has a pretty beefy looking hub and I've had no problems with them. However, I now have a set of Velocity Deep Vs that I ride on more. The Deep Vs dont spin as well and you can feel the weight difference, but I can probably ride them off of a cliff and still ride home on them. That's a bit extreme I guess but they are that durable. Not only are they stronger than strong but they are 30 mm deep rims- so yes they are aero enough. If these wheels cost more than you're willing to spin, a set of Deep Vs built by Velocity are available on their website. You'll get a 24 spoke front/32 rear with 14g spokes and Velocity hubs for around $300. Don't let pre-built prices fool you. I ordered a pair and let me tell you, they were built after I ordered them. They even have sticker with the build date and builder's initials on the inside of the rims. I received mine on 9/19/2008 and they were built on 9/17/2008. I ordered them on 9/12/2008. Anyway, they are still cool looking and durable-even if they aren't lightweight. The Neuvation M28 Aero3 are more attractive but they do have a 16 front/20 rear spoke set up.
Until recently, I would have agreed with you about low count wheels. However, some around here would seem to disagree. It's been ten years since I've ridden anything but 36, op, 14ga, 3x, I figured I might give new technology another try and figured who better to ask about where to start, then a bunch of big f__cks? The neuvations are already off my list. I haven't given much consideration to building up some deep V's, CXP's or other aero rim, because I've not lived here long enough to be knowledgable about who the best local wheelsmith would be for my needs. I've asked around a little and there are a couple I like but until I know them better. It just seemed like an easier and more usefull experiment if I stuck to factory wheels.

Originally Posted by dizzy101
Here's a quote from Peter White Cycles (he knows wheels) that might be appropriate here:
Unfortunately, Mr. White discredits himself in his first sentence with regard to this discussion by pointing to Open Pros(a rim generally considered to be a pretty good Clyde performance standard) as an example of "Racing Rims".
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Old 03-05-09, 06:27 PM
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I'm 260-270 and ride DT Swiss 340/R1.1 32 spoke (front & rear) wheels built by Excel Sports. Good compromise between weight, strength, and serviceablity. It's nice knowing that any bike shop will have a replacement spoke. Not that I've needed them, no problems with 2500 miles on them. I'm pretty sure you could substitute the 240 hubs with no compromise in durablity, but weight was not my concern.

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