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What does a 350lb clyde ride

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What does a 350lb clyde ride

Old 04-01-09, 09:25 AM
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What does a 350lb clyde ride

Hello,

I Just had a gastric bypass last week and while I am recovering, I want to pick out a bike to ride/ commute to work 20 miles each way.

I had been looking at the Surly long haul trucker and the Surly big dummy The Kona Hoss.


Any input on a better,cheaper bike of the same quality would be appreciated. I would like to buy once.

I have a GF and a diamondback mountain bike but it is too small and outdated/worn.
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Old 04-01-09, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by lephturn
Hello,

I Just had a gastric bypass last week and while I am recovering, I want to pick out a bike to ride/ commute to work 20 miles each way.

I had been looking at the Surly long haul trucker and the Surly big dummy The Kona Hoss.


Any input on a better,cheaper bike of the same quality would be appreciated. I would like to buy once.

I have a GF and a diamondback mountain bike but it is too small and outdated/worn.
The LHT and the Hoss are good choices. The BD, not so much, unless you plan on hauling around a lot of stuff all the time. Unloaded, it's really just too long and heavy for a 40mi round trip every day (just my opinion, tho.)

I ride a Cross Check, and while you've got a few pounds on me, I'll vouch for the sturdiness of the Surly frames. They're not the lightest gear out there, but they'll get the job done, they can take a pounding without falling apart, and they're not too expensive.

Another option is the Specialized Hardrock, which has a popular following among the heavier riders in the Clydesdale set. Outfitted with some street tires, bar ends and fenders it would make a reasonable commuter. I used to ride a Stumpjumper as a commuter, and I have a couple of friends who use Stumpies as distance bikes; the Hardrock will work just as well for similar purposes.
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Old 04-01-09, 11:41 AM
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I'll second the Hardrock. I'm currently over 400lbs (an dropping thankfully) and commute on one, as well as ride it for fun and exercise. I still need to put fenders on it, but here is a pic.

sorry for the picture quality, I just snapped it out my office door really fast.
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Old 04-01-09, 12:35 PM
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As a long term post op RNY me self you are a long way 40 miles round trip..you will be weak for a while yet..i am riding a giant terrago but, the hoss is a hell of a bike....one major word of caution..when you have had a bypass we become a lot different from other people..personally and a lot of post-oppers i know feel the same is that we can run out of juice/ gas/ steam whatever you call it...if we were a car we have no "gas level low" lamp and you must be careful not to run out of steam when out on a long ride and of course we are big units that need a lot of fuel...
cheers
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Old 04-01-09, 12:50 PM
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I was at 452 when i started I am in the 370's now and i have a Kona Hoss Dee Lux. I absolutly love it!
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Old 04-01-09, 01:11 PM
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Reminds me of that old joke..."whatever he wants!"

The three bikes you listed are very different from each other. I'd probably avoid the BD if you only want one bike - I've heard great things about it, but it's a pretty specialized rig. If you're not going to be hauling a ton of stuff all over the place, I'd want to avoid the extra weight, especially if you're going to be 40 miles/day commuting.

If you're going to be commuting on roads primarily I'd say get the LHT or most any other touring bike. The frame should stand up to the weight of you and whatever you're bringing with you on your ride to work, and will also give you thinner tires and multiple hand positions. It's possible to get these for the Hoss, but they're added expenses.

Ultimately though, test ride a bunch of stuff and buy what you like.
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Old 04-01-09, 04:03 PM
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Originally Posted by gotls1
Reminds me of that old joke..."whatever he wants!"
LOL, you beat me to it!

LHT seems like an excellent choice, but you might consider buying used. That keeps you from eating depreciation if you change bikes later. You will have a chance to figure out if you will stick with the riding, and exactly what kind of riding motivates you. I went from trails to commuting to brevets, and now touring. You can always buy n+1 bikes, too. Nothing wrong with it if you ride and enjoy them all. Good luck and hope you enjoy riding.
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Old 04-01-09, 06:04 PM
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Lephturn, I have nothing but good things to say about Kona. They make a great bike for the money. I'm currently lugging my ass around on a Kona Dew and absolutely love the bike. I've never been on a Hoss though however I'm sure it is an awesome bike. Whatever you purchase I hope you have a blast riding.

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Old 04-03-09, 12:57 AM
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I agree on the used bike thing. The best part is that if you don't like it you can sell it for what you bought it for and recoup your losses. I'm trying a bunch for fit right now from Craigslist.

I had a GT Karakoram K2 mtn bike steel framed. They are pretty strong because of that triple triangle design. Shogun also has that design.
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Old 04-03-09, 01:00 AM
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Out of curiousity...is there a busline so you can bus to work and bike back? 20 miles each way...how fast you planning on biking? Thats between an hour or two each way... I don't know about you...but thats pretty early to get up to get there on time.
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Old 04-03-09, 09:31 AM
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While many bikes will support the weight of a Clyde not all are bulletproof in the materials used
to construct all brands of bikes. There is one brand that is heavy duty because it's built for industrial
use......Worksman.

Worksman is a 100+ yr old American bike company that builds bikes for industrial use with models
modified for "civilian" use. Any bike that Worksman sells will support over 500 lbs with ease.

Worksman will build a bike to your order then ship it ready to ride to your front door at a cost less than
many other bikes of lesser robust quality.

https://www.worksman.com/
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Old 04-03-09, 10:11 AM
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I ride a Specialized Allez Triple back and forth to work everyday.

I added a Bontrager Back Rack II with a basket and am looking at panniers.
So far no issues. The bike is light and responsive and feels really good.
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Old 04-03-09, 10:34 AM
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At 326 I bought a Kona Jake with 36 spoke wheels built to handle the weight and a Kona Cinder Cone with a strong wheel build and a heftier fork than stock. I was going to get a Hoss, but couldn't find one late in the year, so the shop bomb proofed the Cinder Cone. Both have been perfect. They were in the $800 range.

I would recommend you shop for a bike shop first, as that makes all the difference in the world. Finding one that's actually interested in providing a rideable bike and a positive experience for you is extremely important, IMO. A good shop will customize a bike for you and only charge the difference on upgrades. So if you get an upgraded wheelset, they should give you credit for the factory wheels to minimize your expense.
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Old 04-06-09, 10:51 AM
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At 350 lbs., before my gastric bypass surgery, I was riding my updated old frames, but I had new wheels built. I got Phil Wood hubs, and 48 spoke rims. They worked just fine. Now I am approaching 250 lbs. and I will probably keep using the 48 spoke wheels.
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Old 04-06-09, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Griffin2020
I ride a Specialized Allez Triple back and forth to work everyday.

I added a Bontrager Back Rack II with a basket and am looking at panniers.
So far no issues. The bike is light and responsive and feels really good.
Does it make me crazy that I am quoting myself?

Anyway...I am no longer 350+. I am passing 330, and have no plans on stopping. Absolutely no issues with the bike.
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Old 04-06-09, 03:26 PM
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The LHT is a fine bike and would suit you well. I'm not 350, but I've put quite a bit of weight back on over the winter (big surprise, huh) and am up to 335. I have precisely zero complaints with mine. I know several other clydes have them and like them as well.

Although I have to admit, a 40 mile round trip commute sounds incredibly ambitious. Perhaps you are up to it, but yikes. I love riding my bike, but talk about taking a chunk out of your day...
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Old 04-06-09, 03:54 PM
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i'm 260 and i like the feel of my steel marin mtb than the alu romax i have. for the moment at least. maybe when i lose a few pounds i won't feel like its gonna snap. but i've heard that alu is plenty strong and its really the wheels that give way first before the frame. from what i've heard the hard rock is the choice for clydes. theres a big difference in the feel of road bikes and mtbs, go to a good bike shop and try out as many as you can and see which one you like. pros and cons of each road vs mtb. good luck with the decision - hope it works out for you
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Old 04-07-09, 10:23 PM
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Don't burn out too quick. Gotta admire the gusto though! Just started in on my new LHT and love it so far...
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Old 04-09-09, 04:24 PM
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I'm a little over 300 and wanted a road-ish bike that wouldn't be destroyed under me, so I got a cyclocross bike under the assumption that they are built a bit beefier to withstand that kind of activity. I have a Cannondale X7, am extremely happy with it, and have not had any issues related to my weight or otherwise. My previous bike was a Marin Kentfield hybrid (cheap one, about $300) and that would break in some fashion every few weeks (generally broken spokes) which I definitely believe was due to my bulk.

Only potential issue about going that route is that it does not have points from which to mount any sort of rack... I use a BOB trailer for errands, commuting, cargo so that isn't an issue - but worth mentioning.
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Old 04-09-09, 04:37 PM
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'82 Schwinn Traveler fixed gear, Weinmann DP-18 wheelset. Before that I was riding a BD Motobecane Messenger fixed. Both held up fine for regular jaunts around town on 23mm tires and 32 spoke rims.

Thanks to litigation, most bikes that aren't specifically built for racing seem to be heavily overbuilt.

If you were going to be jumping off curbs or serious downhill MTBing, I'd recommend something really heavy duty, but for casual riding I'd look into whatever steel framed bike makes you happy, and then just make sure the wheelset is built for strength rather than lightweight.

With your surgery, you'll be losing weight like a mofo, so buy a bike you'll be happy with even at a lighter weight.
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Old 04-14-09, 07:46 PM
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+ 1 on the Worksman -

This is a real unsung company and they make absolutely bulletproof bikes. My dad rode one for years when he was an electrician in a large warehouse. I am thinking of getting one that is tricked out with front & rear baskets for a city commuter / grocery hauling bike. Definitely need to change those long horn style bars out for Raleigh North Road bars though.
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Old 04-14-09, 08:23 PM
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I also had a gastric bypass. I had it last Feb and started riding in the spring. I started with a Trek Hybrid and quickly found I wanted more. I got a Trek 7.3fx in Oct or so and have ridden it since. I plan on moving to more of a road bike though.
Because the bike will last alot longer, you might want to think about getting something for a lighter weight. You'll drop weight pretty damn quick and before ya know it, you'll be 275ish.
don't let some of the folks fool ya. You can ride most of the bikes carrying this weight (and you'll be getting lighter by the day).

I wish I had put in more money and just got what I thought I should get at the begining. would have made it alot easier on me and definately alot cheaper in the long run.
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Old 04-14-09, 09:08 PM
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Originally Posted by lephturn
Hello,

I Just had a gastric bypass last week and while I am recovering, I want to pick out a bike to ride/ commute to work 20 miles each way.

I had been looking at the Surly long haul trucker and the Surly big dummy The Kona Hoss.


Any input on a better,cheaper bike of the same quality would be appreciated. I would like to buy once.

I have a GF and a diamondback mountain bike but it is too small and outdated/worn.
With bikes you generally get what you pay for, if you look at a $500 bike and an $800 bike, the $800 bike will generally have a little better components. The term better is often a difficult one, some components will be made a little better, some will have a better alloy, some will simply be a little lighter.

Now the 3 bikes you mentioned, are all different, classes of bike. The LHT is a touring bike, the BD is more of a utility.heavy hauler bike, and the Hoss is a mountain bike. For commuting, you typically don't need to haul massively huge loads, so the BD may be overkill there. The Hoss is a mountain bike, so in order to turn it into a commuter you need to use different tires, you need to add fenders, you will be unhappy real fast with the front suspension. That leaves the LHT as probably meeting your goals the closest, it's a touring bike, that means that the chain stays are a little longer then usual, so that you can put a rack on it, without a lot of heel strike. The geometry is set up so that one can tour, which often means spending hours and hours in the saddle.

Most folks around here who have one, love their LHT, however there are other bikes in the same class that you might also look at, The Rocky Mountain Sherpa(s), the Trek 520, touring bikes seem to be going through a bit of a revival, so while finding one a couple of years ago was difficult, many manufacturers are now offering something in this class.
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Old 04-20-09, 03:12 AM
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One thing that you have to consider when you compare different brands is the fit, particularly if you have a non-standard "95th percentile" shape.

In my case, for instance, I'm 5'10" [179cm] but I have a 31" [79cm] standover. So I have short legs and a long torso.

My previous bike was a 1997 Trek 700 hybrid, which always had me feeling cramped when I was riding it, but punched me in the goolies whenever I had to stop and sit astride it.

So I knew I needed something that was about 21.5" [55cm] in the top tube, but I wanted to have at least some standover room.

Starting with the effective top tube length, I looked at these options:

Surly LHT https://www.surlybikes.com/longhaul.html

- 54cm: ETT 21.9in (55.5cm), SO 31.2in (79.3cm)

Masi Randonneur https://www.masibikes.com/geo11.html

- 56cm: ETT 21.6in (55.5cm), SO 31.6in (80.3cm)

Pre 2009 Trek 520 (New Geometry for 2009) https://commutebybike.com/commuter-bi...uct.php?id=208

- 21in: ETT: 21.9in (55.5cm), SO 30.1 in (76.4cm)

So I hunted down a 520. I still don't have a lot of standover clearance, but at last I've got about an inch.

Another bike that would have worked for me is the Fuji Touring.

https://www.fujibikes.com/Specialty/Touring/Touring.aspx

The 49cm model has a 21.5in (54.7cm) ETT and a 29.84in (75.8cm) SO. The components aren't as good as the others but these can be upgraded, and still be under their retail.

If I was doing the whole exercise again I would probably look at 54cm ETTs and go for a longer stem, as this would have given me a wider choice, and lower standover heights. I would probably still buy the 520, but I would have bought a 19inch model, with an ETT of 21.5in (54.5cm) and a SO of 28.6in (72.7cm).

So I would suggest is that you get your fit worked out first, and then go look for the bike. Look them up and study the geometry charts.

The Competitive Cyclist fit program is one place to start

https://www.competitivecyclist.com/za...LCULATOR_INTRO

Last edited by Abacus; 04-20-09 at 03:26 AM.
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Old 04-20-09, 03:32 AM
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Originally Posted by lephturn
I have a GF and a diamondback mountain bike but it is too small and outdated/worn.
Oh, and don't rule out the old Diamondback mountain bike as an interim measure.

I have a 1997 Diamondback Wildwood that I bought after I gave up on the hybrid, but before I bought the 520. I still use it on those days when I feel like taking it easy.

Those things are built for carrying clydes. 36 spokes front and rear, rigid forks, relaxed geometry. Put some road slicks on it and get it serviced - you might be surprised at how useable it is.
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