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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 01-11-10, 12:28 PM   #1
dcrowell
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Oopsie!

I attended a "Park Tool School" session at my local LBS last night. We covered bearings and such. Nothing earth shattering yet. The other students were roadies that hadn't been on their bikes in a while (it is January after all), and here I was with a dirty, salt-covered hybrid that I had just ridden in the slop a few hours earlier.

All was going well, until time to remove the rear wheel QR skewer. Once removed from the wheel, the skewer promptly fell apart. Some tiny little clip that holds the lever in place had disintegrated. The lever was only held in place by the force of being tightened.

At least it happened in the right place. I had a replacement skewer in a matter of minutes.

I shudder at the though of things coming apart while going downhill on a snowy street.

In other news, I have totally worn out my chain and cassette, but I'm not worrying about it yet, my new bike will be with me on Friday.

Last edited by dcrowell; 01-11-10 at 12:29 PM. Reason: Horrible spelling
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Old 01-11-10, 01:10 PM   #2
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I attended a "Park Tool School" session at my local LBS last night. We covered bearings and such. Nothing earth shattering yet. The other students were roadies that hadn't been on their bikes in a while (it is January after all), and here I was with a dirty, salt-covered hybrid that I had just ridden in the slop a few hours earlier.

All was going well, until time to remove the rear wheel QR skewer. Once removed from the wheel, the skewer promptly fell apart. Some tiny little clip that holds the lever in place had disintegrated. The lever was only held in place by the force of being tightened.

At least it happened in the right place. I had a replacement skewer in a matter of minutes.

I shudder at the though of things coming apart while going downhill on a snowy street.

In other news, I have totally worn out my chain and cassette, but I'm not worrying about it yet, my new bike will be with me on Friday.


Yup - That was the right place for the discovery! MY first (ok I have not changed many) flat tire was in my living room. I opened a botttle of wine and called a friend who walked me thru the steps to change it. I like having the problems occur int he shop or at home....
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Old 01-11-10, 05:11 PM   #3
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Last spring I changed a flat in my living room too. I didn't have any wine and I'm sure it would've helped me immensely. Instead I watched and re-watched tire changing videos that showed everyone changing the flats smoothly and easily. Eek. I've never been so filthy, covered in sweat, and deeply unimpressed with myself since the tragic incident when the fridge door broke and sent bottles of maple syrup, sesame oil, and pickles crashing to the floor and flowed under the fridge.

But it's much better to find a disaster in progress when you not on the bike. Congrats!
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Old 01-12-10, 11:24 AM   #4
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I took their advanced class last February. The folks at the bike store know me pretty well (the Winter tires and the Generator hub light gets lots of attention whenever I show up). They having some fun with me by giving me a hard time about my dirty chain. I brought a long a new chain and cassette so why would I clean the old one. There was a good variety of bike being brought in everything from a fairly new higher end Time CF road bike to an older Panasolic touring bike. The instructor is also one of manager of the local chain and took the time to show us not just how to take our bike appart, but the difference in the various components over time and the differences between the various brands of switchgear. We had a great time. As we started working on the wheels I actually had a spoke pop... good timeing, they put on a new spoke for free. I also had two of the little "J" channels for my V-brakes get quite rusty after 2 years of winter use, they also gave me some replacements for free. They were very cool about helping us not only get our bikes 100% appart, but ensure that we got them back together and fix any little problems along the way. The class was supposted to run for 6 hours, but we ended up taking 8 hours as we had a larger group than normal (8 vs. 6). For $125, I got the new Park Repair manual, the use of the shop's tools and assistance from their techs, andl new shifter and brake cables. As a side bonus they brought in food. Not a bad deal. I knew how to do most of the things we did on the bike already, but it is nice to learn from other tech the little things that make the job go easier. I highly recommend to anyone that likes to tinker to take one of these classes. As with the OP and myself, you might just get luck and have a part fail right during the class rather than out on the road.

Happy riding,
André
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Old 01-12-10, 11:45 AM   #5
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Glad it broke where it did!
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Old 01-12-10, 02:08 PM   #6
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I was actually a little apprehensive about spending the money on the class. I figured I'd never be able to learn to do those things. I've only had one class so far, but I can remove and reinstall my cassette, and adjust wheel bearings.

Now to buy more tools...
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Old 01-18-10, 09:12 AM   #7
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I was actually a little apprehensive about spending the money on the class. I figured I'd never be able to learn to do those things. I've only had one class so far, but I can remove and reinstall my cassette, and adjust wheel bearings.

Now to buy more tools...
I bought a basic set of Spin Doctor tools from Performance bike for under $50. I've gotten plenty of use out of it. The tools are not nearly as nicely finished as the Pook Tools, but at 1/4 the cost, they work perfectly for the light use it gets in my house. The pedal wreches, pedal extractor, bottem bracket tool, and rear cassette tools all have been invaluable. The only tool that looks a little weak it the hold down strap for the cassette removal, but so far it is working fine. I could not possible jsutly spending $300 for pretty much the same tools from a top brand. When I buiy a set of cuters however I'll probably spring for the higher quality unit, my past experience with wood and other tools is that cutting tools quality tends to improve with price.

Happy riding,
André
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Old 01-18-10, 12:53 PM   #8
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After three sessions so far, I'm a bit more impressed with the class. I've now replaced cables. I also bought the cable cutter (it was expensive, it had better last) and cables for my daughter's bike, and replaced those last night. It felt good to do it without the watchful eye of the instructor.

I'm not buying the toolkit. I'm just buying tools as I need them. I had a bottom bracket tool and pedal wrench from some time ago. I have a mini tool that includes a chain tool and spoke wrench. I should probably get the cassette lockring tool and chainwhip... oh, and cone wrenches. That can wait until I have the money though.
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