Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
Reload this Page >

WTF are you guys using for tires and WTF am I doing wrong?! (LONG)

Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

WTF are you guys using for tires and WTF am I doing wrong?! (LONG)

Old 03-24-10, 09:43 AM
  #26  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NYC
Posts: 582

Bikes: Giant Rapid 3

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jyossarian
Most gas station compressors don't normally pump up to 110 psi or even 85 psi since car tires usually only pump to 50-60 max. Also, they use Shrader valves. If you're using Shrader, that's fine, but if you're using Presta, you'll need an adapter.
LOL, while I did hit my head when I crashed I can assure you I'm not a total idiot and your statement is false. A gas station compressor can EASILY inflate a bicycle tire. Car tires do only go to 50 or 60 max but they take a greater quantity of air to get it there. And of course I've got the adaptors though I hate these stupid presta valves, I'd prefer oldschool schrader, I'm about to take a drill to my rims and enlarge the hole!
CPFITNESS is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 10:11 AM
  #27  
VoodooChile
 
zoste's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: AZ
Posts: 1,048

Bikes: Salsa Casseroll

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by CPFITNESS
LOL, while I did hit my head when I crashed I can assure you I'm not a total idiot and your statement is false. A gas station compressor can EASILY inflate a bicycle tire. Car tires do only go to 50 or 60 max but they take a greater quantity of air to get it there. And of course I've got the adaptors though I hate these stupid presta valves, I'd prefer oldschool schrader, I'm about to take a drill to my rims and enlarge the hole!
Don't do it...

Don't:

1)...fill your tires from a gas station compressor. They're designed to move a large volume of air quickly...enough to over-inflate before you know it;

2)...drill holes in your rims...though I think you're kidding, you'd only end up destroying your rims. Presta valves hold higher pressures better than schraders; it's what they're designed to do. Once you get used to them, they're pretty easy to use; and

3)...use an automotive tire gauge to check bicycle tires. They're not accurate enough at the pressures you need. Besides, are you putting an adapter on the gauge?
zoste is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 10:26 AM
  #28  
Senior Member
 
canopus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Kingwood, TX
Posts: 1,574

Bikes: Road, Touring, BMX, Cruisers...

Liked 173 Times in 111 Posts
I have been running some Michelin City's in the 32 size. No flats yet in 8 months and 1000+ miles (and I don't worry about what I'm running over). If your bike can handle it I would go to a larger tire. As everyone else has said, get a good floor pump for the house and keep your mini for emergencies. If your tires are having problems setting on the rims you might try spraying the bead with alcohol after getting the tire on then inflating it slowly and working the tire tire bead so that you get an even witness line.
canopus is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 10:32 AM
  #29  
Senior Member
 
EKW in DC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 2,053

Bikes: Trek 830 Mountain Track Drop bar conversion

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Good points, zoste.


Originally Posted by zoste
Don't do it...

Don't:

1)...fill your tires from a gas station compressor. They're designed to move a large volume of air quickly...enough to over-inflate before you know it;
+1

Originally Posted by zoste
Don't:

2)...drill holes in your rims...though I think you're kidding, you'd only end up destroying your rims. Presta valves hold higher pressures better than schraders; it's what they're designed to do. Once you get used to them, they're pretty easy to use;
It is possible to drill out the rims (see Schrader), but if you absolutely insist on making the change and drilling the rim, I'd have a professional do it.

Alternatively, if you really don't like the prestas, buy a couple Schrader adapters for them. They're only a couple bucks each and are much less of a headache than drilling a rim.

I have grown to really like my presta tube (only in one wheel at the moment), but I like them so much I plan on buying a grommet and converting my front wheel to presta, too.

Originally Posted by zoste
and Don't:

3)...use an automotive tire gauge to check bicycle tires. They're not accurate enough at the pressures you need. Besides, are you putting an adapter on the gauge?
As others have said, a quality floor pump w/ a gauge will be your friend. Most accurate reading you'll get. A good one doesn't have to cost a lot. Someone mentioned $50. I've had this one for almost a year and it's been great for me. Costs less than $30 incl. shipping.

As for my tires, I've got 35mm Nashbar brand city tires on my hybrid. I'm 300-ish pounds, and w/ the exception of flat caused by a reallt nasty piece of glass last Friday, I haven't had any problems w/ them at all so far.
EKW in DC is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 10:32 AM
  #30  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NYC
Posts: 582

Bikes: Giant Rapid 3

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by zoste
Don't do it...

Don't:

1)...fill your tires from a gas station compressor. They're designed to move a large volume of air quickly...enough to over-inflate before you know it;

2)...drill holes in your rims...though I think you're kidding, you'd only end up destroying your rims. Presta valves hold higher pressures better than schraders; it's what they're designed to do. Once you get used to them, they're pretty easy to use; and

3)...use an automotive tire gauge to check bicycle tires. They're not accurate enough at the pressures you need. Besides, are you putting an adapter on the gauge?

lol, yeah I was kidding. All real air compressors move large volumes of air pretty quickly. Dad was a mechanic growing up, i've played a lot with air compressors and even use them to blow golf grips on and off from time to time.

The reason I don't bother with a foot pump is I live in a 5th floor walkup and often have the bike locked downstairs and i'm honest with myself, I'm going to be annoyed with bringing the footpump down, then lugging it back up again, then going to ride EVERYSINGLE DAY. It's easier to just ride the few blocks to the bike shop and hit the compressor.
CPFITNESS is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 10:35 AM
  #31  
Senior Member
 
canopus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Kingwood, TX
Posts: 1,574

Bikes: Road, Touring, BMX, Cruisers...

Liked 173 Times in 111 Posts
Originally Posted by CPFITNESS
lThe reason I don't bother with a foot pump is I live in a 5th floor walkup and often have the bike locked downstairs and i'm honest with myself, I'm going to be annoyed with bringing the footpump down, then lugging it back up again, then going to ride EVERYSINGLE DAY. It's easier to just ride the few blocks to the bike shop and hit the compressor.
It shouldn't take everyday, I would say probably every 5 to 7 days, once a week, check the pressure.
canopus is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 10:56 AM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,796
Liked 144 Times in 107 Posts
Used to have a Santana tandem and it came with Panaracer Pasela TG tires in 32mm and they'd take about 100psi and support 350# without a problem. Never had a pinch flat. They're pretty puncture resistant tires, too. But, they are susceptible to sidewall damage so if you ride in the city and frequently run over trash, rocks, curbs, etc, you might want something with tougher sidewalls. I currently run these tires in 28mm or 32mm on my tourer.

Schwalbe Marathons are good tires too and have tougher sidewalls. There are a couple of versions with tougher puncture protection -- check the Schwalbe website for details. They are somewhat pricey compared to the Panaracers.

Specialized used to have a 26mm Armadillo that would take about 115psi and was pretty tough. I'm not sure if they're still made, but they were tough tires. Probably yours are too.

28mm tires will hold you up and are adequate. But, you'll probably have less problems if you got to 32mm and keep them inflated to 85 psi or better. Probably a better ride on crappy streets and less likely to fail. If, of course, your bike can take 32mm tires.

There are frame pumps that will get your tires hard. Zefel HPX will and so will the Topeak Morph road pump with gauge. For 28mm tires, either will work pretty well. For larger tires, you're going to have to pump for a long time to get them hard as they require you to move a lot of air. But, you can do it. A good floor pump (Silca or equivalent) is a good thing to have although they don't fit well on the frame.

Gas station air compressors usually will pump up to 100psi or so. They need to be able to do that in order to inflate car tires to 50psi or so. If you want to have a time about as exciting as watching paint dry, try to pump a car tire to 50psi with a compressor that only puts out 60 to 70psi. It takes a long time. Has to do with physics and fluid dynamics and how long it takes to move air depending on the pressure difference.

If your tires are properly installed and inflated, they shouldn't be popping off the rims. If they are properly inflated and they do pop off, your tube should explode. As mentioned by a previous guy above, when you install the tire, inflate it just enough to be spongy (10 to 20psi or so) and then check all around to make sure that the bead is properly seated and that the tube isn't trying to sneak out under the bead.. With modern hook bead rims and any of the tires mentioned in this thread, it should be real obvious and you shouldn't have any problem.

If you have Prestas, get yourself one of those little Shrader adapters. They can come in handy. Also, you might consider a CO2 inflation setup. They can make things easier.
desconhecido is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 10:56 AM
  #33  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NYC
Posts: 582

Bikes: Giant Rapid 3

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by canopus
It shouldn't take everyday, I would say probably every 5 to 7 days, once a week, check the pressure.
NO WAY, maybe not every day, but no more than every other day, these friggin tires lose air like crazy.
CPFITNESS is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 11:02 AM
  #34  
Out fishing with Annie on his lap, a cigar in one hand and a ginger ale in the other, watching the sunset.
 
Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: South Florida
Posts: 16,056

Bikes: Techna Wheelchair and a Sun EZ 3 Recumbent Trike

Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 17 Posts
I use Soma Everwears. I have 2 years on the set I currently have on the bike, and I'm not a short miler, either.

Originally Posted by CPFITNESS
I'm 6'3" 250 lbs had my giant rapid 3 since 2nd week of february. Just got another flat tire today. That makes my total now 3 flat tires. (5 if you count the 2 that I damaged because the LBS kinda mis-informed me on my minipump)

The first issue was not an actual flat tire, the tire itself somehow bubbled on my 2ND TIME OUT on the bike. not sure what caused it I just knew that I felt a bah-bump bah-bump and looked down and saw my wheel wobbling. I was scared ****less that I bent my rim that early on because someone had told me that at my weight I was going to go through tires.

They replaced that tire with an armadillo, so far no problems with it though I don't really like the feel of the tire and I'm paranoid that i've blown a tire again.

2nd issue was a couple weeks later, I ride 8 miles to a postoffice in lower manhattan and lock my bike up. I come outside an hour later and the front tire is flat. fortunately there is a bike shop 2 blocks away. I tell them to just replace it with an armadillo as well.

3rd issue was caused by me, I was trying to top off my tires with my mini pump and broke both valves. took it to lbs and had them replace the tubes. get down the street and bah bump, bah bump. I see that the front tire was off the bead. I deflate,tuck it back in, inflate with my minipump (that I was finally told is not for topping off pressure, its to get enough air to get you back on the road and headed to the nearest decent pump/air compressor) i pump it up and it's good to go.

A few days later I top off the air in the tire and bah bump bah bump, the bead on the front is out again. This time I take it home and inspect the tire and there appears to be a little bit of damage on the tire but I couldn't tell if it was enough to make it not seat properly. i finally decide to just put the stock tire back on the front. I rode 18 miles with that on sunday and then rode 10 miles today and locked up the bike. I come downstairs a couple hours later to go to work and whaddyano, tire is flat again! I pump it up with mini pump and roll the bike around a bit and I hear the air hissing out.

So now I'm going to put my armadillo back on and see if it will seat properly. if not, I'm going to see if I can send it back because perhaps it is damaged enough on the sidewall and wont seat. All I know is that I'm trying to love my bike, i really am. when she is working, she is great. but these flats are killing me. I live in Manhattan, the streets suck and I really do my best to avoid the bad streets. unfortunately, i'm new to biking so I'm still learning which streets to avoid, but it's not like I'm jumping off of curbs or nailing huge potholes.

It's gotten to the point that I've lost confidence in riding the bike, especially at high speed and that is really annoying because I love how peppy the bike is. What kind of tires are you guys riding on. The stockers are kenda kwest 700c x 28 max pressure 85psi though LBS said I could inflate to 100. the armadillos are rated at 100psi max. Any suggestions for me? Can I go to a wider tire on these stock rims? would that even help? how much speed will it kill?
__________________
. “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant
Tom Stormcrowe is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 11:31 AM
  #35  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Mountain View, CA
Posts: 1,257

Bikes: 2012 Scott CR1 Comp

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Are you closing the presta valve when you are done inflating the tire? It's the little nut you have to loosen in order to get air into the valve. I ask because if something hits the tip, you will lose quite a bit of air. However, you have more of a problem then you think if your tires need to be inflated every day. Even when I was riding nearly every day last summer, I only had to top off my tires every 4 rides or so. If you are losing so much air you have to re-inflate your tires, you have a slow leak in your tubes, and likely you have something embedded on the inner surface of the tire that keeps tearing up your tubes.

I am 180 lbs, but I have been riding Bontrager Race X Lite Hardcase tires since I started riding, and although they are 50 a tire, they are well worth it. I have gotten exactly one flat since January 2009, and that was due to me not checking my tires after the previous ride for rocks/glass/etc. After every ride, i take a carpenters knife and a rag, and pick out all debris I see embedded in the rubber. The tires look pretty cut up, but they are solid. If I run over a nail or large shard of class, no tire will prevent that, and I will likely have to get out a boot to get back home, but other than that, these tires can take just about anything, as long as you keep up on picking debris out of the rubber after every ride.
deep_sky is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 11:51 AM
  #36  
Downtown Spanky Brown
 
bautieri's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Enola, Pennsyltucky
Posts: 2,108

Bikes: Motobecane Phantom Cross Pro Kona Lana'I

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by CPFITNESS
The reason I don't bother with a foot pump is I live in a 5th floor walkup and often have the bike locked downstairs and i'm honest with myself, I'm going to be annoyed with bringing the footpump down, then lugging it back up again, then going to ride EVERYSINGLE DAY. It's easier to just ride the few blocks to the bike shop and hit the compressor.
Now it makes sense why you're doing what you're doing

Maybe you aught to go with a fatter tire. On top of a cushier ride the air leeks out slower. I'm not sure why, probably due to the lower PSI and thicker sidewalls. I had a set of 32's that only had to be topped off once a week. In comparison my 23's would need topped off every day. To be honest, stopping by the bike shop/gas station every day to air up sounds like a bit of a PITA to me. Is there any way you could securely store a floor pump at work? That way there you can top your tires off once a day and hopefully avoid some flats.
bautieri is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 12:41 PM
  #37  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Mountain View, CA
Posts: 1,257

Bikes: 2012 Scott CR1 Comp

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Eh my 23 and 25 are usually at 110 psi (wet roads get a lower psi to give more traction), and don't need daily top-offs. I am not running some amazing awesome tubes either, just some regular ones i got from my LBS.
deep_sky is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 12:56 PM
  #38  
Senior Member
 
CliftonGK1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 11,375

Bikes: '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2015 Trek Domane 6.2 disc

Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by bautieri
Maybe you aught to go with a fatter tire. On top of a cushier ride the air leeks out slower. I'm not sure why, probably due to the lower PSI and thicker sidewalls.
Tire thickness has nothing to do with how fast the air leaks from the inner tube.

Due to the smaller overall volume, a small amount of air escape has a more drastic effect on pressure change in a 23 or 25mm tire than the same volume of air escaping from a 32 or 35mm tire. It's a lesser percentage of the total volume of air.

That said; different types of tubes will bleed air at different rates. Latex vs. butyl rubber, and thin little racing tubes vs. heavy "thorn resistant" tubes will all contribute to the different rate of air leakage, along with the overall tire volume and pressure.
My 28mm Gatorskins at 115psi need topped off daily, or I'll see a 5 - 7psi drop in 24 hours.
My 32mm Pasela TGs at 95psi only need a fill every 3 - 4 days before I notice a drop to 90psi.
__________________
"I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
- Mandi M.
CliftonGK1 is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 02:54 PM
  #39  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NYC
Posts: 582

Bikes: Giant Rapid 3

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by deep_sky
Are you closing the presta valve when you are done inflating the tire? It's the little nut you have to loosen in order to get air into the valve. I ask because if something hits the tip, you will lose quite a bit of air. However, you have more of a problem then you think if your tires need to be inflated every day. Even when I was riding nearly every day last summer, I only had to top off my tires every 4 rides or so. If you are losing so much air you have to re-inflate your tires, you have a slow leak in your tubes, and likely you have something embedded on the inner surface of the tire that keeps tearing up your tubes.

I am 180 lbs, but I have been riding Bontrager Race X Lite Hardcase tires since I started riding, and although they are 50 a tire, they are well worth it. I have gotten exactly one flat since January 2009, and that was due to me not checking my tires after the previous ride for rocks/glass/etc. After every ride, i take a carpenters knife and a rag, and pick out all debris I see embedded in the rubber. The tires look pretty cut up, but they are solid. If I run over a nail or large shard of class, no tire will prevent that, and I will likely have to get out a boot to get back home, but other than that, these tires can take just about anything, as long as you keep up on picking debris out of the rubber after every ride.
WE'VE BEEN INFILTRATED!!!! FYI, this is the clydesdale forum. I'm 250, thats a significant difference. So I just got back from 4 loops (24miles) in central park. Stopped by the bike shop and talked them a bit first. They agreed that a good footpump or a good bike specific pressure gauge to check at home and then swing by them is ideal. to the poster that said going to the bike shop for air is a pita, not sure if you read my other posts but I live in Manhattan, I can ride the 4 blocks to my LBS faster than I can get up and down my stairs 2 times for the damn pump!
To the one who suggested I leave one at work, work is a gym on the 46th floor, I can definately leave one there in my locker and at least I can take the elevator up and down! I may end up doing this simply because bike shop opens at 10 am, most mornings I'm out the door between 5:15 and 6:15. I can get the 10 blocks to work in the am on slightly soft tires but it's annoying if I'm done with a client at 830 or 930 and want to immediately go for a ride and the bike shop isn't open yet (then I guess that leaves the gas station!)

So FWIW, the bike shop checked out the front wheel, we deflated the tire and double checked the bead and pumped it up again. the same thing, when we spin the tire, the rim is def true but the tire has a little bit of wobble to it. If I have another episode of tire popping off the rim, I'm going to send it back to specialized as a defect.

One question that I think I missed is what was causing my flats. The first issue wasn't an actual flat, something made the sidewall of the tire bubble out and the tire had proper pressure. bikeshop is trying to get manf to replace. 2nd time, i got tire fixed at bikeshop downtown, I didn't ask them what caused it and they didn't give me the tire back. the other flats were caused by me breaking the valves incorrectly thinking that my mini pump could fill them completely. Yesterdays flat seems to have been caused by debris. there is a tiny little slit in the tube and it appears to be close to where the topside would be if the tire were inflated. A pinch flat would be on the rim side, correct?

So hopefully, my issues are under control, these new york streets really suck. I think eventually I will get a second set of rims. I will put slightly larger tires on these stock rims and then get a better set of rims and outfit them with lighter "racing" tires for days when I want to go for fast pleasure rides in areas like central park with smoothly paved and relatively debris free streets. Not to mention the feel of the armadillos completely SUCKS! If they will prevent flats, then I will deal with the feel, but it's a noticeably smoother faster ride with the stock rubber.
CPFITNESS is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 03:02 PM
  #40  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NYC
Posts: 582

Bikes: Giant Rapid 3

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
one last question. my tires are 700x28. they always sell me 700x23 tubes. Would I get anymore durability with a larger tube?
CPFITNESS is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 03:22 PM
  #41  
Bikesman
 
RedWhiteandRed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Northern Clime
Posts: 364

Bikes: Giant Seek 1 IGH; Specialized Roubaix On Order

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I had the 70x32 Maxxis COlumbiere's on my bike: a bunc of lats later I switched (at teh LBS recommendation) to a Bontrager Race Lite Hard Case - ZERO flats in 5,000 miles over lava hot glass infested tarmac.

The new bike will get the hard case treatment after a few flats for sure.

Must be very tough owning a bike store in Manhattan - non-stop Manhattanite hipsters.
RedWhiteandRed is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 03:28 PM
  #42  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,796
Liked 144 Times in 107 Posts
The tube probably is not your problem though you could use a bigger one if you wnated. I think the 23c tube is probably for 20c to 25c and then the bigger is like 28c to 35c. The bigger tube would be a little heavier and maybe a little more durable but it will also be flabbier and easier to trap between the tire and rim. Quite a few people like to go with the smaller tube because they are easier to fit without pinching.
desconhecido is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 04:06 PM
  #43  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NYC
Posts: 582

Bikes: Giant Rapid 3

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by RedWhiteandRed
I had the 70x32 Maxxis COlumbiere's on my bike: a bunc of lats later I switched (at teh LBS recommendation) to a Bontrager Race Lite Hard Case - ZERO flats in 5,000 miles over lava hot glass infested tarmac.

The new bike will get the hard case treatment after a few flats for sure.

Must be very tough owning a bike store in Manhattan - non-stop Manhattanite hipsters.
Most of the hipsters are in brooklyn and would frequent stores over the brooklyn bridge in lower manhattan. My store is on the upper east side so tehy get all the rich bankers/lawyers who have never ridden a bike before and go straight to the carbon fiber duraace setup with the Credit Suisse cycling jersey!
CPFITNESS is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 04:09 PM
  #44  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Mountain View, CA
Posts: 1,257

Bikes: 2012 Scott CR1 Comp

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I know that there is a difference between 180 and 250, that's why I put the qualifier there. Past 170, it seems that things change significantly, need more spokes and sturdier rims, more psi in the tires to prevent pinch flats (which look like a snake bite, FYI), etc. Although I technically do not qualify as an Athena, being 180 isn't exactly easy when it comes to gear, either *sigh*

Just saying that my bontrager hard cases have gone over all sorts of road junk around here (paving is a lost art in some towns because rich people hate paying any sort of taxes, and no one EVER cleans the bike lanes) and with a bit of maintenance, have been flat free. Will non puncture resistant tires be faster and feel better? No doubt, but I'd be happy to trade that for the fact that I almost never flat. I carry the full monte of goodies if I do, but so far, they have all been used on other people's flats
deep_sky is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 04:18 PM
  #45  
Perineal Pressurized
 
dobber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: In Ebritated
Posts: 6,555
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by curbtender
6' 250, I run my Armadillos at 120, with 700 23. You may need to bump them up to the max. Still, flats happen.
250 lbs without my pack/bag/load and I've used everything from 700x23 and 26x1 to 700x42 and 26x2.3 and the only issues I've experienced is a bit more accelerated wear on the rear tires. I generally run at maximum indicated pressure.
__________________
This is Africa, 1943. War spits out its violence overhead and the sandy graveyard swallows it up. Her name is King Nine, B-25, medium bomber, Twelfth Air Force. On a hot, still morning she took off from Tunisia to bomb the southern tip of Italy. An errant piece of flak tore a hole in a wing tank and, like a wounded bird, this is where she landed, not to return on this day, or any other day.
dobber is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 05:28 PM
  #46  
Infamous Member
 
chipcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 24,360

Bikes: Surly Big Dummy, Fuji World, 80ish Bianchi

Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by CPFITNESS
one last question. my tires are 700x28. they always sell me 700x23 tubes. Would I get anymore durability with a larger tube?
The size should be fine, but make sure they are not selling you the light weight racing tubes, which are less durable.
__________________
"Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey
chipcom is offline  
Old 03-24-10, 05:45 PM
  #47  
Senior Member
 
curbtender's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: SF Bay Area, East bay
Posts: 7,784

Bikes: Miyata 618 GT, Marinoni, Kestral 200 2002 Trek 5200, KHS Flite, Koga Miyata, Schwinn Spitfire 5, Mondia Special, Univega Alpina, Miyata team Ti, Santa Cruz Highball

Liked 2,759 Times in 1,280 Posts
Originally Posted by dobber
250 lbs without my pack/bag/load and I've used everything from 700x23 and 26x1 to 700x42 and 26x2.3 and the only issues I've experienced is a bit more accelerated wear on the rear tires. I generally run at maximum indicated pressure.
Yeap, I get two rears per front and usually have enough left to pass it on to a flip bike.
curbtender is offline  
Old 03-25-10, 05:59 AM
  #48  
Downtown Spanky Brown
 
bautieri's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Enola, Pennsyltucky
Posts: 2,108

Bikes: Motobecane Phantom Cross Pro Kona Lana'I

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't know why I continue to try and help you out when all you do is snark the advice everyone gives you, but maybe you could put a small pump in a backpack and carry it with you. If you do get a flat it will certainly have you aired up in less time. That or just do what you're currently doing and deal with it. It sounds like NYC is a tough place to cycle if even the absolute most basic form of bicycle maintenance (air in the tires) is such a chore for apartment dwellers.

Maybe you’ll have better luck in the regional forum asking other NYC residents how they deal with this.

Last edited by bautieri; 03-25-10 at 06:03 AM.
bautieri is offline  
Old 03-25-10, 06:43 AM
  #49  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NYC
Posts: 582

Bikes: Giant Rapid 3

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bautieri
I don't know why I continue to try and help you out when all you do is snark the advice everyone gives you, but maybe you could put a small pump in a backpack and carry it with you. If you do get a flat it will certainly have you aired up in less time. That or just do what you're currently doing and deal with it. It sounds like NYC is a tough place to cycle if even the absolute most basic form of bicycle maintenance (air in the tires) is such a chore for apartment dwellers.

Maybe you’ll have better luck in the regional forum asking other NYC residents how they deal with this.
Um, what advice have I snarked at? Obviously people don't know my skill level but I'm a pretty smart guy, I know how to close a presta valve! I was simply letting you know that it's not difficult to go find a compressor here in NYC. I live on 83rd st and york avenue. there is a bike shop with a compressor on york ave between 83rd nd 84th but I don't use it since ididn't buy my bike from them. Then there is my bike shope on 87th and 2nd ave and he has another store on 79th and 3rd avenue. there is also a store on 88th and Lexington Ave. Now if you have never been to NYC I can tell you that all of those shops are within 1/2 mile of each other.

FWIW, I've asked for some info from fellow New York cyclists who understand the city conditions well. The problem is none of them are clydes so they don't have nearly the issues with flatting as I have
CPFITNESS is offline  
Old 03-25-10, 06:46 AM
  #50  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NYC
Posts: 582

Bikes: Giant Rapid 3

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bautieri
I don't know why I continue to try and help you out when all you do is snark the advice everyone gives you, but maybe you could put a small pump in a backpack and carry it with you. If you do get a flat it will certainly have you aired up in less time. That or just do what you're currently doing and deal with it. It sounds like NYC is a tough place to cycle if even the absolute most basic form of bicycle maintenance (air in the tires) is such a chore for apartment dwellers.

Maybe you’ll have better luck in the regional forum asking other NYC residents how they deal with this.
Um, what advice have I snarked at? Obviously people don't know my skill level but I'm a pretty smart guy, I know how to close a presta valve! I was simply letting you know that it's not difficult to go find a compressor here in NYC. I live on 83rd st and york avenue. there is a bike shop with a compressor on york ave between 83rd nd 84th but I don't use it since ididn't buy my bike from them. Then there is my bike shope on 87th and 2nd ave and he has another store on 79th and 3rd avenue. there is also a store on 88th and Lexington Ave. Now if you have never been to NYC I can tell you that all of those shops are within 1/2 mile of each other.

FWIW, I've asked for some info from fellow New York cyclists who understand the city conditions well. The problem is none of them are clydes so they don't have nearly the issues with flatting as I have
CPFITNESS is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.