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-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   New Embarrassed Rider (https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/732803-new-embarrassed-rider.html)

americanrecluse 11-06-14 08:40 AM

Thank you for this, Tailor. It was magnificent. I am that nervous beginner (pre-beginner really), and I also had a nasty injury that laid me up for a few years - until I decided not to be laid up any more and to start bike shopping - so it was especially relevant for me.

jgadamski 11-06-14 11:56 AM

In a country that embraces sizeism as well as crappy nutrition and car based transportation, there are more overweight folks than not. I rarely even respond to the critical twits. They are a vocal minority of a minority population.
You are getting exercise for your reasons, you ride for your reasons. Your happiness does not depend on a twits approval.

dr_lha 11-06-14 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EvilWeasel (Post 17267578)
Not sure if it was mentioned but try joining the local cycling club. You would be surprised to learn that those spandex clad guys that you worry about laughing at you as they fly by, are mostly friendly helpful guys that are more than happy answer any questions. It's just hard to meet them when they are doing 25 mph. You have to find them when they are stopped. The easiest place to do that is a bicycle club.

This is great advice. My transformation from a 500 mile a year cyclist to a 2500 mile a year cyclist was thanks to my local club. Despite looking like a fairly intimidating bunch of guys, they're actually really friendly, helpful and want to make you a stronger rider. My local club also has rides for all levels, starting at those who ride around 8-10 MPH ("D"s in our terminology).

Usually the members of these clubs are brought together by a love of riding, if they see that in you, your weight won't be an issue.

ClaretMike 02-25-15 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by superclyde6 (Post 12730940)
Hey mate!

Good on ya for riding! Keep it up!

I am in the same boat as you. I used to play Rugby until I got hurt and couldn't run anymore and ended up keeping the Rugby diet without keeping the Rugby exercise so I went from a girlish 20 stone (280 lbs) to a fat bast*** 27 stone (380 lbs). Unlike you I am also ugly as sin and look like a brute so I am twice cursed. ;) Fortunately for me I can do something about the weight.

I also believe that spandex is a privilege and not a right and look like a German tourist in a Speedo (*DON'T* Google this! You will go blind! For those of you who have seen it... My condolences.) but the extra padding around "the taint" makes a world of difference on the saddle so my advice would be to do what I do which is to wear sweats or cargo shorts over the spandex. It hides the nasty and it makes you look less like a wanna be speed daemon.

Don't pay the tossers poking at you any mind. Just smile and wave at them. At the end of the day they don't matter. What matters is that you can loose weight but they can't change the fact that they are bitter unhappy little gobs who are so pitiful that the only way they can feel good about themselves is to put someone else down.

I play rugby too....albeit I dont get a regular game. I want to get cycling but until I read this post I was scared I would look too big on a bike. (No offence meant by that to anyone)
I'm very self conscious at i'm currently weighing 215lbs....now I realise I shouldnt care what I look like, just jump in and feel the benefits. Well do e everyone for inspiring others.....you're all legends.

Fly2High 02-26-15 11:13 AM

Don't be embarrassed. You wear cycle clothing not for its looks but for its functionality.

I was born early 70's and grew up in the 80's. I had the plaid pants in the 70's and the mullet and crazy jams shorts in the 80's. And all the while I wore the super loud, flourescent colors! then it was the nutty tennis Andre Agassi stuff. Don't forget the Z Cavaricci suits (think Zoot suits cut like a waiter and tapered to the waist) and those Zumba baggie pants...

I should have NEVER allowed photos or event takena stem out my front door!


If I can live through the 70's and 80's of odd clothing styles, I think a slimming spandex should be no problem.

To me, I look so much better in bike clothes than in my regular baggie everyday stuff. Things seem to be held in a better place and hopefully it gives me a glimpse of what hard work, exercise and dieting will yield without the compression support.

Of course with style today of people wearing their clothes below their posterior, I think we have more to reply than they have to say about us in bike clothes.

Enjoy the bike clothes and the activity and never let anyone derail you from enjoying your passions.

Sincerely,
Frank

ChrisZog 03-14-15 02:08 PM

My biggest issue was with jerseys. I carry a lot of the weight in the gut so a little kept trying to peak out. And finding a jersey that is big enough is a challenge was nearly impossible. I'm riding in a 3-4XL from Aerotech now with a very tall and large gym shirt as an underlayer. I can deal with insults. I've been overweight since elementary school so I've heard it all. In fact, most of the biking community is always encouraging and friendly.

We did the Arizona 100 Club ride and I fell apart at the end in the wind (we went from 3.5-4.5 minute miles down to over 7 minutes because I was exhausted and cramping up). I had a personal escort of 2 cops on motorbikes, the race marshal, and the sweeper car encouraging me. The only bad part is that the guys would not let me and the wife buy them coffee afterwards. Cyclists seem to have a kick butt community. Much better than the gaming community when it comes to weight (which is why I never bought a webcam even when I was working on a YouTube and Twitch channel)

SavageSam 03-21-15 12:43 PM

I've never been too concerned with what others think. I used to weigh over 400 Lb. (Now, 195) My wife and I had gastric bypass surgery and we're coming up on 11 years post op. and I wouldn't change a thing. Hey, at least you're trying. You're out there DOING something about your situation. Keep up the good work. :thumb:

SavageSam 03-21-15 01:39 PM

I was reading some more posts here and another thing came to mind. I have a pair of bike shorts that are actually TWO pairs in one. The inner pair is spandex with padding where you need it and the outer pair look like regular shorts although they're not. I was never a believer in bike specific clothing until I finally bought some. They BREATHE.

travbikeman 04-03-15 06:32 PM

I wanted to take the time and say thank you to everyone on their stories. Or at least the many I've read so far. I too have felt a bit embarrassed to go riding. I'm currently 346 pounds, down from 537 15 months ago. It's comforting to know that I'm not the only one that feels this way.

clabbergirl 04-05-15 07:57 AM

Encouraging words!
 
I too appreciate the positive comments here to those who have already or are contemplating getting out there and making a change. People can be cruel, and the parts of society that feel their world must be what media tries to convince us it should be seem more vocal than those that appreciate life in all its variety. Ignore them or even pity them - they do not have the experience with which to show kindness perhaps.

"Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Press on." - Henry Rollins

SavageSam 04-05-15 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clabbergirl (Post 17691616)
I too appreciate the positive comments here to those who have already or are contemplating getting out there and making a change. People can be cruel, and the parts of society that feel their world must be what media tries to convince us it should be seem more vocal than those that appreciate life in all its variety. Ignore them or even pity them - they do not have the experience with which to show kindness perhaps.

"Scar tissue is stronger than regular tissue. Press on." - Henry Rollins

I BELIEVE that discriminating against heavy people is the last form of acceptable discrimination out there. One day (I hope) it will go away...

clemon79 05-11-15 03:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SavageSam (Post 17692492)
I BELIEVE that discriminating against heavy people is the last form of acceptable discrimination out there.

100% truth.

Hi, my name's Chris. (Pleezedtameetcha.) I've not had the chance to scan through the whole thread, but I wanted to share my story.

I'm down 167 pounds (as of last Friday) from when I started back in September (had surgery in February). Still a ways to go yet (goal's 240), but as of now this is the least I've weighed since my sophomore year of high school. (I just turned 44.)

People are starting to notice now. Tons of positive feedback from very supportive friends; people who I don't even know at work asking me "hey, have you lost a lot of weight lately?" That sort of thing. Confidence is increasing. I keep waiting for some little kid to point at me in the grocery store and say "Mommy, look at the fat man!" like they used to, just so I can go over to the parents and say "Yeah, you should have seen me 167 pounds ago." :) And in fact that's my answer to the haters in general. Someone wants to give me crap from a moving car? Great, say what you like, I probably still am a fata**, doesn't change the fact that I'm 167 pounds better off than I was less than nine months ago. I'm too old to worry about what other people think.

Anyhow, I had started surfing around looking at bike information, thinking I was within range to get one now and with the weather getting nicer it would beat riding my little training cycle from my couch, which is how I happened across this forum. But I was just surfing and gathering information.

Completely unrelated, a co-worker the other day was asking me how things were going along and told me how excited she was that she got a bike. "Do go on!" I said.

She recommended a bike shop a few blocks away from my place, so Saturday a friend of mine and I went down just to really look and get questions answered, and Sunday I bit the bullet and went down and rented a bike, after confirming with them that the model I was looking at would support me. I had not been on a bike since...well, my sophomore year of high school. :)

Turns out the old adage is true.

Started out riding around in the adjacent parking lots just to get my sea-legs back, and then rode to the other side of my (relatively small) downtown, and then got on the bike trails. Holy crap, so much fun! Bikes have gotten SO MUCH better in a quarter-century, with shifters that actually work and (relatively) comfortable seats and such. Most importantly, though? Not so much as a single disparaging look from anyone I came across in my travels. Nothing but friendly smiles, because we were all out having fun on the trails. I was a Fellow Cyclist(tm).

Two-plus hours later (and utterly wiped out, but hey, first ride in 25 years dammit! :)), I returned the bike and said "Gimme one of those, please." (It's a Norco Rideau, which according to the shop is able to withstand up to 400 pounds, and I mention that because that is information I couldn't seem to find anyplace else online, so maybe if this post gets crawled someone down the road might find it and have it be useful.) When I first started looking I was expecting something decent to cost me $1,000. Got out the door for about $550 after tax.

The primary reason I post this is to encourage: if whoever is reading this is saying "aw, what if people see me?" or "oh, I can't possibly do that," then I say a) yeah, they will see you, but surprisingly, people who see you making a genuine effort to better yourself tend to be supportive and friendly (and coming from me that's saying something if you knew how much hope I have for the human race all-up), and b) you might surprise yourself, because I sure as hell did.

clemon79 05-11-15 03:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by travbikeman (Post 17688443)
I wanted to take the time and say thank you to everyone on their stories. Or at least the many I've read so far. I too have felt a bit embarrassed to go riding. I'm currently 346 pounds, down from 537 15 months ago. It's comforting to know that I'm not the only one that feels this way.

You are doing AMAZING and there is not one reason you should be doing anything but riding with your head held high. After my surgery I've been losing somewhere between 3-5 pounds a week and I'm eager to see how that number changes if I can get out and ride once in a while, once I get this thing tricked out. :)

wvrick 05-11-15 07:23 PM

2 Attachment(s)
I'm just getting started with a @400 lbs, not sure how few pds over because I was on my scales a two months ago at 391. Now I get the big E on the read out so I'm over the 400 mark. I started riding about a month ago when I got a trike, as of now I'm only been riding once a week after having problems and repairs but now it running well. I feel embarrassed from time to time but I have to do it for myself. I finally retired two years ago after fighting my VVD and fighting leg ulcers, 34 years on my job wasn't good to me but I stuck it out until I secured my retirement. I have always been up and down in my weight going from 300 to 198 playing paintball and scuba. Since I retired my endurance has crashed to where I can't walk 100 yds. I love the trike and being a new rider had that leg suck accident my 4th ride, no real damage but after I found out you need a way to anchor your feet to the pedals I now have SPD shoes and pedals and what a difference those made.. I hit 29 mph... But not trying to stray too far off topic, yes I do get embarrassed but I have to do it for me.http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=450735 http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=453372

wvrick 06-13-15 06:02 AM

Something I've learned about "what I thought" was being embarrassed about my size and riding. My first time out to the park/campground where we ride I felt everyone was watching me, I rode anyway and still ride 3~4 times a week but I realized almost everyone I met or passed by would look and smile. I started getting common comments about the weather or about our dog then people would later see me and say good to see you. I think people seeing someone large on a bike is not common because most large people are home on the couch, but I think most people are glad to see you doing something about it. One thing for sure if you keep the pedals turning you will get smaller, for the last 3 months my bathroom scales would not read my weight so I knew I was over 400 lbs and could have been as much as 420 but this morning like every morning I weight myself and rather than the big "E" I seen 399.4 lbs. Now I can was watch my weight drop and not be a mystery how much I weigh.

clemon79 06-13-15 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wvrick (Post 17890515)
but I realized almost everyone I met or passed by would look and smile.

Yeah, there are still pinheads, but there are pinheads everywhere. For the most part though I have found what you have. People on the trails are darn nice.

Quote:

but this morning like every morning I weight myself and rather than the big "E" I seen 399.4 lbs. Now I can was watch my weight drop and not be a mystery how much I weigh.
And it's awesome how much of a motivator THAT is, too. Good for you! (That said, my doctor when I was pre-surgery recommended I weigh once a week, because there can be fluctuations from day to day through no fault of your own that people might find discouraging but those will average out over a week so it seems to be a better sign of progress. It's been working for me, but of course you have to do what works for you. :))

(And that trike looks *totally* fun. :))

VCSL2015 06-14-15 02:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wvrick (Post 17796771)
I'm just getting started with a @400 lbs, not sure how few pds over because I was on my scales a two months ago at 391. Now I get the big E on the read out so I'm over the 400 mark. I started riding about a month ago when I got a trike, as of now I'm only been riding once a week after having problems and repairs but now it running well. I feel embarrassed from time to time but I have to do it for myself. I finally retired two years ago after fighting my VVD and fighting leg ulcers, 34 years on my job wasn't good to me but I stuck it out until I secured my retirement. I have always been up and down in my weight going from 300 to 198 playing paintball and scuba. Since I retired my endurance has crashed to where I can't walk 100 yds. I love the trike and being a new rider had that leg suck accident my 4th ride, no real damage but after I found out you need a way to anchor your feet to the pedals I now have SPD shoes and pedals and what a difference those made.. I hit 29 mph... But not trying to stray too far off topic, yes I do get embarrassed but I have to do it for me.http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=450735 http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=453372


Cant tell you how much you have inspired me and I look forward to hearing about your progress. Keep up the good work one day at a time. YOU ROCK

wvrick 06-14-15 06:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VCSL2015 (Post 17893522)
Cant tell you how much you have inspired me and I look forward to hearing about your progress. Keep up the good work one day at a time. YOU ROCK

Thank you VCSL2015. with the cycling and dieting using SparkPeople I'm finding it's not hard, more of breaking bad habits. My total weight loss this week was 11 lbs, and I know too much too fast but it will slows later. I will keep my current weight in my sig rather than posting too often. :) Tom Stormcrowe was my inspiration.

VCSL2015 06-15-15 12:51 AM

Awesome.
Quote:

Originally Posted by wvrick (Post 17894061)
thank you vcsl2015. With the cycling and dieting using sparkpeople i'm finding it's not hard, more of breaking bad habits. My total weight loss this week was 11 lbs, and i know too much too fast but it will slows later. I will keep my current weight in my sig rather than posting too often. :) tom stormcrowe was my inspiration.


rsieck44 07-23-15 06:28 PM

Your out there and rollin! That's what is most important. The more comfortable you get the more confidence will come. I have always been a big guy 6-5 270. I have been there in the middle of climb and missed a shift. I have fallen over while clipped in...I have had numerous pinch flats... I have been talked about or laughed at my whole life. I just laugh with them. We wont get tiny over night. Heck I am never going to be tiny. Keep workin at it and have fun while you do it.

VCSL2015 07-24-15 03:07 AM

[QUOTE=bautieri;12598407]1st: Who cares what other people think.

I sympathise with what the OP is writing here. I really REALLY care what other people think. This is truly a mental state I have conditioned myself to over time. I think that Rome wasn't built in a day and the longer I have been on my bike, the easier it is to overcome this thought of others watching me. The best advice someone in this forum gave me which I use every single time im out riding and I pass a person, i just repeat to myself: "You are not a mind reader". Meaning I have no idea what that guy is thinking. Good or bad and its not my business. So I actually have freed myself to have more mental energy to pay attention to the road and concentrate on not crashing which in my mind is way more important.

PatrickR400 07-24-15 07:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wvrick (Post 17890515)
Something I've learned about "what I thought" was being embarrassed about my size and riding. My first time out to the park/campground where we ride I felt everyone was watching me, I rode anyway and still ride 3~4 times a week but I realized almost everyone I met or passed by would look and smile. I started getting common comments about the weather or about our dog then people would later see me and say good to see you. I think people seeing someone large on a bike is not common because most large people are home on the couch, but I think most people are glad to see you doing something about it. One thing for sure if you keep the pedals turning you will get smaller, for the last 3 months my bathroom scales would not read my weight so I knew I was over 400 lbs and could have been as much as 420 but this morning like every morning I weight myself and rather than the big "E" I seen 399.4 lbs. Now I can was watch my weight drop and not be a mystery how much I weigh.

It is fun when the scale starts playing ball and you can start measuring your progress. Keep it up! :thumb:

As for what other think when they pass me, I don't have time to care, I'm going somewhere better for me.

wvrick 07-24-15 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PatrickR400 (Post 18009146)
It is fun when the scale starts playing ball and you can start measuring your progress. Keep it up! :thumb:

As for what other think when they pass me, I don't have time to care, I'm going somewhere better for me.

Thanks Patrick, since I got back to riding its now become a part of my life and something I do. People have now got to know me and sometime talk while I'm riding. A lot of people are too involved doing what they do but a few smile and wave. The scales do read less, but sometimes stall but I have to remember muscle building is at work too and I can get around a lot better than when I started.

PatrickR400 07-25-15 09:00 AM

Muscle building is at work too indeed and other things change; you mass redistributes itself and you will find out that you'll have to buy new clothes. Bummer... ;)

Scales are funny (not really); mine is one of those weight and %fat things. For some reason my %fat percent is allover the place, fluctuating wildly. As for my weight, I had a stroke a while back, and I have small twitches which mean that the reading bounces, sometimes by a full pound. I weight myself 2, 3, 4 times in a row and take the first value that repeats. Logged everyday...

The real measure of success is not the number, its the way it makes you feel.

Shamejedi 07-28-15 08:04 AM

Glad I read this. I'm 350# and share just about every anxiety posted here. I'm bike shopping anyway. Thank you all for the inspiration!


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