Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

advice for a new guy with a sore a$$

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Old 05-11-12, 06:44 AM
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porkchopexpress
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advice for a new guy with a sore a$$

Howdy everyone, I am new to this forum and probably won't be very active on the message boards but I would really appreciate some advice. I am a somewhat large guy at about 215 lbs and 76" tall and I would like to cycle to and from work on a regular basis for exercise. I purchased a cycle cross bike because I thought it would be efficient on the road and sturdy. I rode mountain bikes in my teenage and college years so that is what I am used to. My commute to work is only 4.5 miles each way. My problem is that every time I ride to work, my a$$ hurts for days afterwords. It is a deep pain like I have hemorrhoids, (but I am pretty sure I don't). I just got a pair of shorts with built in padding but I am waiting for my butt to heal before I try again. Is it normal for so much pain from such a short ride? My seat is the standard tiny hard as wood road bike saddle. Should I consider a new seat? Would a mountain bike be more comfortable?
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Old 05-11-12, 06:47 AM
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10 Wheels
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Your pain sounds sever enough to visit a doctor.
You may have a medical problem.

What bike and saddle are you riding?
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Old 05-11-12, 07:20 AM
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Yo Spiff
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First thing to check is for proper adjustment. I'm about your weight and I ride a leather Brooks. Almost never have a sore butt. Biggest issue is maybe some minor back aching when I do some longer rides of 50+ miles.

Check for correct height. The rule of thumb I have always used is the knee should be just *slightly* bent when at the furthest extension in the pedal stroke. A good way to achieve this is to raise the saddle until you feel you are stretching to reach the pedals, then lower it a touch.

Some folks like their saddles tilted a little nose up or nose down. I find I prefer it as dead-level as possible, and dead level is a good starting point. Fore/aft adjustment is personal preference, maybe someone else has a rule of thumb for that.

Mostly it is about proper adjustment and having a saddle that fits your sit bone width.
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Old 05-11-12, 07:32 AM
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Did you get fitted to your bike at your LBS? Riding bibs/short make a huge difference.
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Old 05-11-12, 07:36 AM
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From your description it doesn't sound like the ache over the sit bones that is normal for new riders and goes away after a couple of weeks. So either it is about your position on the bike, or you have a saddle that doesn't suit you. First thing to do is sort out your position on the bike. If you have someone nearby who is knowledgeable, get them to advise you. If you want useful advice from this forum, pictures of you on the bike would help.
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Old 05-11-12, 07:59 AM
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If your Fit and position are correct and your doctor gives you the thumbs up (uhh, no pun intended), you may just need to find a saddle with some "relief" built into. In other words, a groove or cut-out that runs down the center of the saddle. It helps get your weight off of your perineum and can greatly reduce discomfort. Saddles are one of the trickiest parts of cycling. It can take a LOT of trial and error to find the one that works for you. So be prepared for that and don't be hesitant to try out different ones. Whatever the case, I hope you can find a quick resolution to your problem.
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Old 05-11-12, 08:03 AM
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You can say ass.
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Old 05-11-12, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
You can say ass.
LOL. Channeling umd.
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Old 05-11-12, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by avance View Post
Did you get fitted to your bike at your LBS? Riding bibs/short make a huge difference.
Riding shorts make a huge difference and stock saddles are often horrible! I can't think of a single bike I own where I haven't thrown the stock saddle in the garbage as soon as I got the bike home...
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Old 05-11-12, 09:55 AM
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I was fit for the bike at the bike shop where I got it and the seat is a WTB SST comp.... ass
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Old 05-11-12, 10:08 AM
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While padded shorts/bibs can make things nicer, they shouldn't be considered mandatory to feel comfortable on your bike. 2 4.5mile rides separated by an 8-hour break shouldn't cause "days of pain".
Have you tried moving the saddle around (tilt of the nose, or fore-and-aft)? This can make a big difference with comfort.
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Old 05-11-12, 02:21 PM
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Recumbents pretty much solve the issue of butt pain. Jus' sayin'...
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Old 05-11-12, 05:04 PM
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I was told to just keep riding, I did, and the pain eased up in time. Got a SMP saddle, and it's much better now.
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Old 05-11-12, 07:12 PM
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Well, some seats are called ass-hatchets for a reason...

My guess is that a cross seat isn't made for comfort or commutes. Maybe a friend or LBS has a spare seat they can loan you to see if that makes a difference.
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Old 05-11-12, 07:55 PM
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porkchopexpress
You may be riding much more upright than the stock saddle is designed for or your sitz bones are wider than what is considered optimum for your stock saddle?

If that is the case then yes, you may benefit from a different seat (wider).

See if this article helps.
http://sheldonbrown.com/saddles.html
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Old 05-11-12, 07:59 PM
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For me Shorts (bibs) are more of an anti chaffing solution. The chamois (pads) are for wicking moisture away not for softness. The comparison to hemorrhoids (something I have had several years ago) sounds like your skin is rubbing together. Kinda like there's a bunch of wrinkles down there. As you sit in the saddle, skin and clothing shouldn't get bunched up. You may need to "adjust" to get a smooth contact area. Difficult to explain without getting explicit.
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Old 05-12-12, 05:29 AM
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I started riding bout 2009 after 30yrs off a bike. I put some 650+ miles on my upright 'comfort' bike, trying 3-4 different seats, and the best I could do was 20-odd miles at a time without butt and hand pain, but I *could* ride daily, if under 20 or so miles.

Due to getting a hip replacement, and other reasons, I switched to a recumbent trike DEC 2010. I now have bout 1K miles to date, and couldn't be happier with the switch. I do think some people are just better off going recumbent (bike or trike). Just something to consider?

How many miles do you have on this bike so far total? While some people can tell right away if a saddle is good for them, others need around 100 miles or so to tell for sure. Find an LBS that allows returns for discomfit, and start trying different saddles. Why many, many people love the B-17, for me at least, it was more painful to me than the stock saddle that came with my bike. Everyone is different, and it is very hard for anyone here to tell you which saddle will work for you.

Welcome to BF, and good luck~!
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Old 05-12-12, 08:40 PM
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Thanks for all the feedback. I am going to try a few of your suggestions.
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