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"Waist disposal - Ultimate fat loss manual for men" - has anyone read this?

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"Waist disposal - Ultimate fat loss manual for men" - has anyone read this?

Old 05-17-12, 04:29 AM
  #1  
steve2k
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"Waist disposal - Ultimate fat loss manual for men" - has anyone read this?

A recent post about a lady's weight constantly going up made me think of this book I read recently.

I was recommended the book "Waist Disposal - The utilimate fat loss manuial for men" by a friend who's brother, after years of struggling with his weight, finally feels in control of it. I bought the book and thoroughly recommend it.

The author is Dr John Biffra, a British doctor which is interesting for me being British, because most of this sort of diet and nutrition advice comes from America and discusses American foods.

Dr Biffra talks about diets, the effects of different food stuffs and nutrients on the body, the effects of exercise etc. and explains what our bodies are good at eating and therefore what we should be eating. He draws this all out of scientific research and give you details of that research so you can see for yourself (if you can interpret the science).

It's targetted at men but I don't see why the advice wouldn't apply to women too.

The key things I've picked up are:
- fat doesn't make you fat - it makes you feel full so avoid artificially low fat food.
- carbohydrates trigger insulin which causes our bodies to store fat, so avoid these.
- don't go hungry - it will mean your metabolism is stalling and will lead to you making poor food choices.
- protein is the nutrient of choice for feeding muscles - eat as much of this as you like.
- we're not designed to each processed and refined foods, they mess up our bodies internals making it store fat, raise insulin etc.
- low cal/low fat food isn't as important as fresh and natural food.
- exercise doesn't burn that many calories and if you exercise be careful not to eat more (people tend to). Exercise is good for lots of things though, so keep it up, just don't rely on it alone for weight loss.


Has anyone else read this book or follow a protein rich and carbohydrate low diet? I've just started on this path and am interested to see the results. I'm not strictly cutting out carbs but am trying to reduce the starchy, carb heavy food I consume - swapping sandwich for salad, potatoes for green veg, processed food for fresh etc.
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Old 05-17-12, 06:37 AM
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I've followed a low carb diet for the past year or so and lost ~50 pounds (from 270-ish to 220). I did this mostly by following the Primal Blueprint and, more recently, Metabolic Effect.

Like you, I didn't completely eliminate carbs, but the carbs I do get are generally from fruits and veggies. I bonked pretty hard on last Saturday's century ride, so I'm still trying to figure out the balance between endurance events & carb intake.
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Old 05-17-12, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by steve2k View Post
The key things I've picked up are:
- fat doesn't make you fat - it makes you feel full so avoid artificially low fat food.
- carbohydrates trigger insulin which causes our bodies to store fat, so avoid these.
- don't go hungry - it will mean your metabolism is stalling and will lead to you making poor food choices.
- protein is the nutrient of choice for feeding muscles - eat as much of this as you like.
- we're not designed to each processed and refined foods, they mess up our bodies internals making it store fat, raise insulin etc.
- low cal/low fat food isn't as important as fresh and natural food.
- exercise doesn't burn that many calories and if you exercise be careful not to eat more (people tend to). Exercise is good for lots of things though, so keep it up, just don't rely on it alone for weight loss.
I haven't read the book, so I'm not sure what it says, but your summary of it seems doesn't really match-up with what I've learned during my own (successful) weight-loss journey:

- Dietary fat is more difficult to turn into body fat than simple carbohydrates, but if you eat enough dietary fat you will gain weight. Many kinds of dietary fat also contribute to heart disease, high blood pressure, etc. so you can't eat fat with impunity

- Simple or highly-processed carbohydrates trigger insulin, so avoid them; consume complex carbohydrates instead

- If you want to lose weight, you will feel hungry at some point. Perhaps not overwhelming, gnawing hunger but you will be hungry

- Protein is a required nutrient for building muscles... but operating them requires carbohydrates. Protein, depending on the source, may be accompanied by significant amounts of dietary fat. Many people believe that eating large amounts of protein puts undue stress on the kidneys. Studies have shown that high-protein diets exacerbate kidney function loss in those who are susceptible to it

- Exercise can burn significant amounts of calories... if you put in the effort.
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Old 05-17-12, 09:45 AM
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I've had good luck losing weight on reduced carb diets, avoiding grains and getting carbs mostly from fruits, veggies and some dairy and some soy and almond milks. Like Keith, I've struggled a bit on long rides and also during intense training, because I felt under-fueled. I'm now trying a plan called Fuel Right by Apex Nutrition (Kelli Jennings, RD). She recommends eating differently when training and when not training. In simple terms, higher proteins and few simple carbs most of the time, but when training, rely on simple sugars and higher carbs for the energy. Simple sugars and high carbs are only for immediately pre-training and during training and events. Afterwards, back to low carb clean eating. It's been very effective for me, having lost about 30 lbs. since late February. I also focus on small portions, 3 meals and 3 snacks each day. It avoids a full belly feeling, which I find more comfortable.

Kelli also has great information about digestion and why eating differently during training and events is so important so as not to disrupt digestion when training. I highly recommend reading her information.

https://Www.apexnutritionllc.com

Username:apexnutrition
Password: membersonly

Kelli provided this free access as an introduction to her website and information. Feel free to use. I have no affiliation with her, I just like her approach.

Last edited by DoubleTap; 05-17-12 at 09:51 AM. Reason: Added info
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Old 05-17-12, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
I haven't read the book, so I'm not sure what it says, but your summary of it seems doesn't really match-up with what I've learned during my own (successful) weight-loss journey:

- Dietary fat is more difficult to turn into body fat than simple carbohydrates, but if you eat enough dietary fat you will gain weight. Many kinds of dietary fat also contribute to heart disease, high blood pressure, etc. so you can't eat fat with impunity

- Simple or highly-processed carbohydrates trigger insulin, so avoid them; consume complex carbohydrates instead

- If you want to lose weight, you will feel hungry at some point. Perhaps not overwhelming, gnawing hunger but you will be hungry

- Protein is a required nutrient for building muscles... but operating them requires carbohydrates. Protein, depending on the source, may be accompanied by significant amounts of dietary fat. Many people believe that eating large amounts of protein puts undue stress on the kidneys. Studies have shown that high-protein diets exacerbate kidney function loss in those who are susceptible to it

- Exercise can burn significant amounts of calories... if you put in the effort.
Quoted for truth.

One additional complication for low-fat foods is that they typically add some sugar to make them taste better. Calories in < Calories out if you want to lose weight and no amount of fancy names or scientific studies will change that. There are certainly better foods to eat to encourage that relationship and exercise plays an important role as well.
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Old 05-17-12, 10:17 AM
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I over simplified the fat thing to get the point across that fat, in and of itself, isn't the thing that makes people fat. A steak and salad meal with fat on the steak and butter on the veg is going to be better for you than a processed low fat meal with the same calorie value. At least this is the message that comes across in the book. He goes into more detail in the book.

About protein and the kidneys he cites a recent European study that found that a higher protein and fat diet (27% protein, 38% carb, 32% fat) showed no difference in bone or kidney health when compared to a lower protein diet (18% protein, 55% carbs, 26% fat). But there was improvement in weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol etc.

It seems that people on high protein diets naturally eat less, this may be because the protein or fat sate the appetite more than carbs do so people feel fuller for longer. It may also be the better blood/sugar stability stops people craving food after the crash, there's also a theory about it raising your metabolism.

Again, I'm no expert, just repeating what he says in the book. I have noticed though that since swapping my sandwich for a meat + salad lunch, I'm less dozy in the afternoon and I'm far less likely to reach for a snack. This may of course all be psychological and because I read that I shouldn't be hungry for a snack, my brain tells me I'm not.
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Old 05-17-12, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
- Exercise can burn significant amounts of calories... if you put in the effort.
You might find this article interesting https://www.drbriffa.com/2009/08/12/d...eight-loss-no/

While I understand what he's saying from a biological perspective, exercise has lots of other benefits for me. I didn't mean to suggest you shouldn't exercise, just that he believes you can't rely on solely it for weight loss, you need to change your diet too.
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Old 05-17-12, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by steve2k View Post
About protein and the kidneys he cites a recent European study that found that a higher protein and fat diet (27% protein, 38% carb, 32% fat) showed no difference in bone or kidney health when compared to a lower protein diet (18% protein, 55% carbs, 26% fat). But there was improvement in weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol etc.
I'm not an expert on this by any means, but the last study I saw (summary here) seemed to suggest that eating lots of protein isn't a problem if your kidneys are 100% healthy, but can be a problem if you're one of the numerous people with undiagnosed kidney problems.

I think the 40/30/30 ratio of carbs/fat/protein is appropriate for many people, but I would hesitate to recommend the eat-youself-silly approach that your initial post seemed to suggest!

Originally Posted by steve2k View Post
You might find this article interesting https://www.drbriffa.com/2009/08/12/d...eight-loss-no/
This article is completely factual... and also somewhat misleading. The example the author gives is someone who burns 250 calories through exercise five times a week, for a weekly calorie deficit of 1250 calories. If you need to burn 3500 calories in order to lose 1lb of fat, you're going to be exercising for almost three weeks! If that's all the exercise you can muster, then the author is correct: exercise alone isn't going to get you to your weight-loss goals.

Here's the thing: 250 calories/day is a pretty pathetic calorie burn. My lunch-time rides burn 400-550 calories four times a week. On weekends, I do longer rides burning anywhere between 1000 and 2500 calories for the weekend. So my total exercise-related calorie deficit is 2600 - 4700 calories/week. That is significant and it's one of the reasons I've been pretty successful at losing weight and keeping it off. I, personally, couldn't have lost all the weight that I did through diet alone.
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Old 05-17-12, 07:22 PM
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post

Calories in < Calories
Quoted for truth.

Everything else just sounds to complicated . Is interesting but how we all have different thoughts and opinions on it and yet they all work for us .
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Old 05-18-12, 12:55 AM
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"It seems that people on high protein diets naturally eat less, this may be because the protein or fat sate the appetite more than carbs do so people feel fuller for longer. It may also be the better blood/sugar stability stops people craving food after the crash, there's also a theory about it raising your metabolism."




I once lost almost 50 pounds on the Adkins Diet back in 2002/2003. I can tell you one very important reason why my appetite went down.

Aside from the boring menu choices on the Adkins Diet when it first came out, getting rid of the previous meals could often be difficult! Back then it was recommended that regular intake of sillium husk would help "move things along", but I still felt like I had a digestive tract full of cement for much of the time.


Oh yeah, I put all of the weight back on when I stopped the diet. Who would have thought, right?
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Old 05-18-12, 02:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Ironhand View Post
Oh yeah, I put all of the weight back on when I stopped the diet. Who would have thought, right?
I guess that's the key right, whatever you do needs to be a lifestyle change that you can adapt and stick to, not just something that you do that's uncomfortable for a few weeks but has results. Otherwise as you say, once you go back to your old habits, your body goes back to it's old way.

Looking forward to seeing how this lower carb eating works out for me.
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Old 05-18-12, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Ironhand View Post
"It seems that people on high protein diets naturally eat less, this may be because the protein or fat sate the appetite more than carbs do so people feel fuller for longer. It may also be the better blood/sugar stability stops people craving food after the crash, there's also a theory about it raising your metabolism."

I once lost almost 50 pounds on the Adkins Diet back in 2002/2003. I can tell you one very important reason why my appetite went down.

Aside from the boring menu choices on the Adkins Diet when it first came out, getting rid of the previous meals could often be difficult! Back then it was recommended that regular intake of sillium husk would help "move things along", but I still felt like I had a digestive tract full of cement for much of the time.

Oh yeah, I put all of the weight back on when I stopped the diet. Who would have thought, right?
I didn't lose 50 pounds, but my wife and I did Atkins about 8 years ago and yes, it worked! And eating bacon for breakfast every day is a blast, I don't care who you are. Unfortunately, it just wasn't a sustainable lifestyle for me and the weight shot right back up when we stopped. Furthermore, I tired easily. Now I'm eating what I want (but much more responsibly than I was in the past) and I have plenty of energy to exercise as much as I want and I'm only about 7 pounds away from where Atkins dropped me off 8 years ago. The difference is that what I'm doing now is sustainable as long as my wife can afford to keep me in bike toys.
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