Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
Reload this Page >

True Accountability - Lying to myself

Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

True Accountability - Lying to myself

Old 06-08-12, 10:56 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Mithrandir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 2,401

Bikes: 2012 Surly LHT, 1995 GT Outpost Trail

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
True Accountability - Lying to myself

So these past 3 months have been trying on me. I've ramped up my exercise after having gained 40 pounds over the winter, but have not dropped a single pound. The good news is that I haven't gained any, but that's hardly a consolation at my present 400 pounds.

I've been absolutely befuddled by it because every time I count my daily calories, I come up with less than 2000; add to that the extra 700 I burn each day exercising (on average; doing about 12-13 hours a week now) and my theoretical BMR of 2500, that **** don't make any sense.


But it turns out I've been lying to myself. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle is a physics principle that states that both the position and the speed of any given subatomic particle cannot be simultaneously known. Simply observing a particle changes its speed. The same, it appears, happens when counting calories. As it turns out, those days when I've carefully marked down what I've eaten, I may have been subconsciously staying away from snacking, in order to "prove" to myself that I'm not eating too much. (And let's face it, counting calories every single day is such a chore and a bore).


Well how do I know this? Last week I had an epiphany. After I got home with my normal load of groceries, I decided right then and there to count the calories of everything I had purchased, and divide by 7, since the food would last me roughly a week. The result was astounding. As it turns out, my weekly caloric intake was roughly 27,000 calories; or if you divide that by 7, it works out to 3,900 calories per day. I just about flipped my lid. Suddenly, everything starts making sense. I *was* overeating after all, but lying to myself about it when I set out and attempted to prove that I wasn't.

Sigh. This week's grocery load was quite different, I assure you. 11,090 calories in total, or about 1,600 calories per day. Add to that 2-3 meals with friends and family during the week, should bring me to about 1,800-1,900 per day, I wager.


So, that's my story. Just a friendly warning that as clydes, we must always be vigilant. It's so easy to slip into that trap where we buy that extra bag of chips and say "I deserve it, I biked 120 miles this week". No, we don't.

God I hope I start losing weight again now.
Mithrandir is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 12:42 AM
  #2  
SuperGimp
 
TrojanHorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Whittier, CA
Posts: 13,346

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix

Liked 64 Times in 47 Posts
Just out of curiosity (and because it sounds like I do the same thing you do and do "test counts" from time to time) how is it that you believe you were eating < 2k calories a day but now you think you were eating 4k?

Did Heisenberg have a cat? I seem to recall a cat in the description somewhere.

Just as a thought, if you are exercising a lot and your BMR is 2500 kcal, restricting yourself to 1800 is going to be difficult. I'd be tempted to suggest a higher base caloric intake (still at or below BMR) and just don't account for exercise calories.

This is one reason I weigh myself daily though - some folks say weekly is fine but I don't want to slip for 3 weeks before I figure out I'm slipping. I'm ok with daily variations.

Good luck!
TrojanHorse is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 01:15 AM
  #3  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 19

Bikes: 2012 Trek 7.5FX

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Schrodinger had the cat but the same idea. A cat in a box is it alive or dead? the correct answer is both( I think ) , until the box is opened you can't know which is true.

counting every day can be a chore, but I have come to rely on the myplate app on the iphone. a lot of the items have bad calorie counts so look at the item and the calories and pick one that is what you believe is accurate. A medium apple can be 60-100 calories depending on which you pick. still in the margin of error if you pick someting in the middle of the range you will end up +- 150 cals daily or so I think. I think we have all fallen for the I burned an extra 500 cals today so I can have an extra large helping of xxxxx. don't do it just let those extra calories lost be a bonus to your deficit for the week
sjscorpiomark is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 02:21 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: cherry hill, nj
Posts: 6,144
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Lets face it...... a lot of us are addicted to food.... plain and simple. So we need checks and balances and what that means for us is to really track what we eat all the time, every meal. Because a lot of us do not have the ability to 1) have right portion control 2) stay away from fatty, salty, and sugary food and 3) are not honest about what we eat. So tracking really takes care of the issues if you tackle it right.

I know one thing..... if I do not track, I over eat and make poor food choices. Plain and simple! I can ride my bike all I want and not lose a pound if I am not tracking.
chefisaac is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 07:55 AM
  #5  
Redux Rider
 
Big_Easy51's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 64
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One little trick I learned was to carry a very small spiral-bound notebook, and write down EVERYTHING I eat (and drink, if the drink contains calories). Do this for a few days, then go back and compute the calories of each and every item on the list.
Many of us eat without even realizing it. A few chips here, a Hershey's Kiss there...and we aren't even aware it is happening.

As Everett Dirksen once said (about spending), "A billion here, a billion there, pretty soon, you're talking real money." And so it is with calories. I don't know about you, but I often find my habits have become so "second nature" that they are totally invisible to me. For instance, when I quit smoking, I found myself reaching for a cigarette every time I answered the phone, stopped at a traffic light or sat on the "john." And I have found unconscious eating to be the same way.
Big_Easy51 is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 09:29 AM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,428

Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB

Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
The other thing to keep in mind is that many foods need to be weighed in order to determine exactly how many calories they have. Say you buy a package of bagels and the serving size is described as "1 bagel (4oz)". If you pull a bagel out of the package, weigh it, and the scale says "6oz" guess what? You need to multiply the calorie count by (6/4=) 1.5. Which means that your 300-calorie bagel has suddenly turned into 450 calories. These "semi-hidden" calories can add up pretty quickly in my experience...
sstorkel is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 12:19 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Mithrandir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 2,401

Bikes: 2012 Surly LHT, 1995 GT Outpost Trail

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by TrojanHorse
Just out of curiosity (and because it sounds like I do the same thing you do and do "test counts" from time to time) how is it that you believe you were eating < 2k calories a day but now you think you were eating 4k?
It is my belief that whenever I was doing a "test count" day, I would subconsciously eat less food than I normally would have, because I knew I was under observation. Then on days when I didn't count calories, I believe I would make more trips to the kitchen without even realising it.


So basically whenever I counted, I'd end up with <2000; but when I counted a whole weeks worth of groceries it came out to be nearly 4000 when divided among the days of the week. Ergo, my test counts were unreliable.
Mithrandir is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 12:23 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Mithrandir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 2,401

Bikes: 2012 Surly LHT, 1995 GT Outpost Trail

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Big_Easy51
One little trick I learned was to carry a very small spiral-bound notebook, and write down EVERYTHING I eat (and drink, if the drink contains calories). Do this for a few days, then go back and compute the calories of each and every item on the list.

I did this nearly 2 years ago when I started losing weight. It was extremely effective at first, and once I developed a routine I decided I could "eyeball" it without actually counting everything anymore; sort of like how I haven't balanced my checkbook in over 10 years. I'm good at math.

But something happened along the way and I lost that skill, apparently. Got lazy or sloppy, or both. Regardless, writing down everything is incredibly bothersome. Some people have recommended using a smartphone for this, but unfortunately I don't have one. My 8 year old phone is still chugging along great, and I don't believe in consuming new products simply because they're newer, so I probably won't get one until it dies.
Mithrandir is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 12:28 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Mithrandir's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 2,401

Bikes: 2012 Surly LHT, 1995 GT Outpost Trail

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by TrojanHorse
This is one reason I weigh myself daily though - some folks say weekly is fine but I don't want to slip for 3 weeks before I figure out I'm slipping. I'm ok with daily variations.
I find that weighing myself is a good habit as well. I was doing this for quite some time. Many people get freaked out by a pound or two of difference per day, but it's usually just water weight and I can safely ignore the fluctuations.


My big slip up was when my office closed in November and I became a work-from-home employee. I was weighing myself every day when I woke up and went to work. Unfortunately when my office closed it completely ruined my routine; I started sleeping in more since I didn't have to drive to work anymore, I didn't take showers sometimes in the morning anymore, and because that's when I weighed myself, I pretty much stopped. I went for 3 months without weighing myself, not realising how many pounds I packed on until it was too late. Big mistake.

Back to weighing myself daily now, however.
Mithrandir is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 12:37 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
goldfinch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minnesota/Arizona and between
Posts: 4,060

Bikes: Norco Search, Terry Classic, Serotta Classique, Trek Cali carbon hardtail, 1969 Schwinn Collegiate, Giant Cadex

Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
I am part of the "weigh yourself everyday" club and keep a moving average, like Tony does. It is helping me stay stable now that I have been trying to maintain my weight for five months. I recommend it as it is a good tool for catching issues quickly.

I track calories on the computer. I am pretty good about doing it every day but when I travel I do not. I think I need to keep track all the time, even if it is just a running total in a notebook. I say that because somehow I jumped up a bit over past couple of weeks and I have been traveling a lot and not doing a good job of keeping track.

I figure both may be lifetime propositions because my body doesn't send me good signals on how much to eat.

I recommend reading https://www.fourmilab.ch/hackdiet/www/hackdiet.html He has a nice no-nonsense approach.
goldfinch is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 12:43 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
NCbiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 353
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Mithrandir
It's so easy to slip into that trap where we buy that extra bag of chips and say "I deserve it, I biked 120 miles this week".
When I'm trying to lose weight, I don't buy that first bag of chips, just more fruits and veggies.
NCbiker is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 01:57 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Chaco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Encinitas CA
Posts: 865

Bikes: Scott CR1 Team

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't want to get in an argument here about low-carb, high fat (LCHF) vs. high carb low fat (HCLF) diets here. But you owe it to yourself to at least investigate whether a LCHF diet makes sense for you. If you're that heavy, you may well have insulin resistance, and it could be that your body is turning your excess carbs into fat. I highly recommend The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living , but there are lots of other good books to read as well.

I had to go to a low carb diet myself because I was close to getting Type 2 Diabetes. For me, this has been a much more productive way of living than constantly worrying about calories and fat. Over the past 5 years, I've lost 45 pounds and my blood work has improved considerably as well as my heart health. I'm not saying this is the way to go for everyone, but it may well be the right thing for you.

Lots of people say that you can't do heavy exercise on a low carb diet. Well I just got back from a 65 mile ride, average 16.4 mph, 2800 feet of climbing and 58 minutes in zone 4. Granted, this is not racing performance, but for a 225 lb. 64 year old, it's not too bad.

Even if you are a firm believer in HCLF diets, it behooves you to take a look at the quality of the food you are eating, rather than just the calories. Are the carbs in your grocery bag highly processed? If so, that's something to cut back on right there.
Chaco is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 02:08 PM
  #13  
Carpe Velo
 
Yo Spiff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 2,519

Bikes: 2000 Bianchi Veloce, '88 Schwinn Prologue, '90 Bianchi Volpe,'94 Yokota Grizzly Peak, Yokota Enterprise, '16 Diamondback Haanjo, '91 Bianchi Boardwalk, Ellsworth cruiser

Liked 14 Times in 13 Posts
I guess I am in the minority in that I don't count calories or weigh myself daily. I try to make better choices than I used to and usually succeed. I don't own a scale and only weigh myself when I go to the doctor or the gym at the Y. If I started weighing myself daily I would obsess. I can tell my progress by how my clothes are fitting, my daily blood pressure, and how far and fast I can ride. Actually those last two items are the main goals and the weight loss is gravy. I've dropped from 286 to 215 in 18 months.
Yo Spiff is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 02:29 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
apollored's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Manchester UK
Posts: 638

Bikes: Apollo Revival Mountain Bike

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Dont forget though that muscle weighs more than fat so when you're building up that muscle you will intially weigh more but will notice the difference in firmer legs etc.
apollored is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 02:31 PM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
CommuteCommando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Southern CaliFORNIA.
Posts: 3,079

Bikes: KHS Alite 500, Trek 7.2 FX , Masi Partenza, Masi Fixed Special, Masi Cran Criterium

Liked 24 Times in 13 Posts
https://fatsecret.com/ is a great tracking app (I use Android). It has helps me keep accurate track, and the more accurately I track, the better my success rate.
CommuteCommando is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 03:46 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Fargo, ND
Posts: 188
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by apollored
Dont forget though that muscle weighs more than fat so when you're building up that muscle you will intially weigh more but will notice the difference in firmer legs etc.
True, but that can be a pretty slippery slope though. Unless you're a 17 year old male or on some sort of chemical enhancement, the average person can only gain at most 2 pounds of muscle per month and that's only with some pretty intense strength training and a healthy caloric surplus.


OP- a food journal, even if only for a week or month, might help. I know I fall into the trap where I think I know how many calories I'm taking in, but then seem to overlook the quick bite here and there to test the meals I"m making for my family. You've made progress from when you were gaining, but have now plateaued. That can be a good time to really scrutinize exactly what you're doing as far as calories in/out.
dehoff is offline  
Old 06-09-12, 03:49 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
goldfinch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minnesota/Arizona and between
Posts: 4,060

Bikes: Norco Search, Terry Classic, Serotta Classique, Trek Cali carbon hardtail, 1969 Schwinn Collegiate, Giant Cadex

Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by apollored
Dont forget though that muscle weighs more than fat so when you're building up that muscle you will intially weigh more but will notice the difference in firmer legs etc.
Not likely to occur on Mith's weight loss diet. On a diet where you lose, say 2 pounds a week of fat, you are not going to be building 2 pounds a week of muscle.

When a person is quite heavy as well as gaining fat when they became heavy they also have gained extra muscle and connective tissue and certainly gained blood volume. A person's obesity isn't just the fat. I certainly have seen some mighty muscular legs on obese men. Weight loss will result in loss of some of that lean mass as well as loss of fat. The issue is how much of the loss will be from muscle. Weight training can help minimize muscle loss on a diet.

The higher your body fat percentage the less muscle you will lose on a diet. The leaner you are the greater the risk of losing muscle.
goldfinch is offline  
Old 06-10-12, 01:13 PM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
RedC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sebring, Florida
Posts: 766

Bikes: Trek Navigator, LeMond Buenos Aires, Madone 5.9, S-Works Roubaix

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Tracking everything you eat is difficult but I don't seem to do as well when I don't track and as of this morning I'm down over 32 lbs since the end of January. So while I agree tracking is a pain it works.
RedC is offline  
Old 06-10-12, 01:37 PM
  #19  
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Happy, peppy New Mexico!
Posts: 29

Bikes: 1997 Specialized Hard Rock GX

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by sstorkel
The other thing to keep in mind is that many foods need to be weighed in order to determine exactly how many calories they have. Say you buy a package of bagels and the serving size is described as "1 bagel (4oz)". If you pull a bagel out of the package, weigh it, and the scale says "6oz" guess what? You need to multiply the calorie count by (6/4=) 1.5. Which means that your 300-calorie bagel has suddenly turned into 450 calories. These "semi-hidden" calories can add up pretty quickly in my experience...
Absolutely! This is one of the very first things I had to figure out upon my diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes...portion control, and that just because something is 'contained' in a convenient 'serving' doesn't necessarily make it so. I often make this point with friends and co-workers who complain about "weight loss plateaus" - sometimes they just don't realize that their portions are out of proportion, LOL! Besides, eating your food with strict attention to actual portion control/serving size makes it last - saving money in terms of replacement cost, but more importantly, saving calories.

Great point, sstorkel!
UpL8 is offline  
Old 06-10-12, 02:06 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Big Pete 1982's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chelan, WA
Posts: 390

Bikes: Cannondale CAAD-10

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think you may be restricting your calorie intake far too much, which I know in my life leads me to crashing hard and gorging myself. I started counting calories at 300 pounds using the LoseIt app on my phone and on the "lose 2 lbs a week" plan my budget started at 3000 calories. I was extremely skeptical of such a high number, but it I stuck to the plan and it worked and I have lost 50 pounds since starting the plan. Now at 250 lbs, my budget is 2300 calories on the same plan to lose 2 lbs a week. That's more than you thought you were eating at 400 lbs. I know it can be tough, but it really works when you count every stinking calorie every day! It's far easier than it used to be though. With all the apps available nowadays, you can usually just scan a barcode.
Big Pete 1982 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Jon A.
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
18
05-10-18 07:27 AM
illusiumd
Training & Nutrition
8
04-20-15 11:22 AM
pcb09
"The 33"-Road Bike Racing
34
02-12-12 11:29 AM
Ozeck
Training & Nutrition
8
08-04-11 06:04 AM
subzeroLV
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
26
10-15-10 06:42 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.