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Very depressed about last ride...

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Very depressed about last ride...

Old 08-09-12, 03:34 PM
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Very depressed about last ride...

My name is Bryan and I am a clyde... My last ride damn near killed me from heat stroke. I allowed my ego to get the best of me and I wouldn't give up till I was in dire straights. I was on a 90 mile training ride on Saturday and it turned out to be one of the hottest days of the year. I did well the first 25 miles. Maintained good hydration, watched my pace and really thought I had a chance. Then the heat came on and I was totally derailled. I had to walk some hills. Took me almost 3 hours to do the next 20 miles. The heat just sucked the life out of me. When I finally pulled into the last stop before the 30 miles back I bought 3 big bottles Gatorade and a bottle of h20. I sat on the curb for over an hour before I stopped sweating. Felt a bit better so off I went. I never started sweating again, I was chilled and about 10 miles later I stopped and I could hardly see the road. I pulled into a grassy spot on the side of the road and callapsed. At some point I called a friend told him where I thought I was but I have minimal memory of it. He was close enough to hear the the Yelm/Tenino race track in the back ground and he knew where I was. I was fortunate to not have any permanent problems but I still physically recovering. Mentally I am very down. I have trained hard this summer for a 124 mile ride in September but now I have zero motivation to get back on the bike. Self-pity? Rationalization (fat and 50)? Just plan scared? Yes to all of these. My ego is very angry and just chewing me up when ever I get near my bike. I am hoping to get back on this weekend and I just don't think I am ready for serious long rides. It needs to be fun. -
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Old 08-09-12, 03:55 PM
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Hello Bryan,
Been there done that. Lat year I "bonked" at 30 miles into a 50 mile ride and yes it sucks. I stopped before my situation got as severe as yours but it took me 2 hours and a meal to recover to 'normality'. After that ride I paid a lot more attention to pacing my long distance rides. Though for me, anything over 60 miles is still a battle of wills between pride and common-sense. Last year I rode back to back centuries as part of a sponsored ride (STP) and after the first day (it was hot) I dreaded getting up in the morning for the next. The next day I decided to get on the bike and just ride till I was done. I surprised myself and rode the whole 100 miles that day.

In other words, assuming all is good medically, climb back into the saddle and just take it one mile at a time
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Old 08-09-12, 03:56 PM
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Old 08-09-12, 04:01 PM
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Hey Bryan. First off, good for you for putting out the effort. I know how it is to have a goal in sight and not want to quit until you reach it...no matter what the cost.

Get better, and take it slow. You'll be back in the swing of things in no time, and it will be fun again. This is one bad experience out of many, so get the good ones going again. However, learn from this and know how dangerous it can be to listen to your ego and not your body!
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Old 08-09-12, 04:05 PM
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I think you got dehydrated and once there it's hard to catch up. Problem is that it comes on slow and it's sneaky--doesn't tell you anything until BAM smacks you between the eyes and shuts you down. I have rode shorter rides, kept the hydration up--at least I thought--only to have it sting me. Did you pre-hydrate before you left the house? That's key for me in Texas! Get a serious amount of water in the system and pee off the excess before you leave. May take 1 to 1 1/2 hours to get balanced, unless you have a place to pee on the ride.
Oh, and eat some before while you are hydrating.
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Old 08-09-12, 04:41 PM
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pre hydration the day before is key. Also nibble and drink every 15 minutes, dont push the speed and start the ride EARLY.

To be frank your area does not get that hot often so perhaps it was a poor choice for doing a training ride that day. (I used to live there so I know that it does not get that hot often.)
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Old 08-09-12, 04:52 PM
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Glad to here you are ok!
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Old 08-09-12, 04:56 PM
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Don't let a little incident like this question the fun of the whole bike riding hobby/activity/sport/whatever it is to you. Embrace it, now you know how your body reacts to temperature and that will come in very handy when planning and executing your upcoming rides.

Hydration comes to mind: you mentioned "maintained good hydration" but perhaps wasn't good enough (maybe because of the heat your body needs more quantity and/or more often than what you originally thought. Pace: Perhaps heat taxes your cardio more than what you thought and need to adjust the pace down accordingly.

I have compared same rides (30-50 mile loops) done at different times of the day (starting 6 am 65C temp, and starting 3-4 pm 95-100 C temp). Found out my Avg. Heart Rate increases by almost 10bpms with a 15-20 C jump in temperature keeping roughly the same avg speed. If keeping the HR within the regular range then speed takes a toll (about 1 mph). Needless to say, i make an extra effort to schedule my rides so at least most of the ride is not in those conditions (planning to start earlier, by the time it's 95-100 out there a big chunk of the ride is already under the belt).

Humidity is another factor to consider that actually has an even bigger effect than just temperature. Hot and humid I drink more, regardless, even though i don't necessarily feel thirstier, i know hot and humid silently dry my body up. If i wait until i "feel" it, it's usually too late.

Don't punish the bike!! She wants to go out, and deep inside so do you. Put the ego in the passenger seat and show him who's the boss. Something was learned and it won't catch you unprepared the next time.

Good luck and come back with a ride report!!!
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Old 08-09-12, 05:07 PM
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Don't be depressed, it happens to all of us (just more often now that we are older and larger). Kudos to you for going out and doing it! Lesson learned. I learned to hydrate before, during and after - also to eat on longer rides.

What doesn't kill you makes you stronger and wiser.
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Old 08-09-12, 05:20 PM
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Whoa, Bryan. You were in a dangerous fix. Take time to recover, jump back into the saddle, and next time when the temperatures climb, go slower. You can still do your double-metric in September. Just pace yourself. Hang in there.
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Old 08-09-12, 05:29 PM
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it happens, it's hot. Its good to know your limits and when to make that call. I wouldn't worry to much about it and push on and learn.
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Old 08-09-12, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by BusterMcFly
My name is Bryan and I am a clyde... My last ride damn near killed me from heat stroke. I allowed my ego to get the best of me and I wouldn't give up till I was in dire straights. I was on a 90 mile training ride on Saturday and it turned out to be one of the hottest days of the year. I did well the first 25 miles. Maintained good hydration, watched my pace and really thought I had a chance. Then the heat came on and I was totally derailled. I had to walk some hills. Took me almost 3 hours to do the next 20 miles. The heat just sucked the life out of me. When I finally pulled into the last stop before the 30 miles back I bought 3 big bottles Gatorade and a bottle of h20. I sat on the curb for over an hour before I stopped sweating. Felt a bit better so off I went. I never started sweating again, I was chilled and about 10 miles later I stopped and I could hardly see the road. I pulled into a grassy spot on the side of the road and callapsed. At some point I called a friend told him where I thought I was but I have minimal memory of it. He was close enough to hear the the Yelm/Tenino race track in the back ground and he knew where I was. I was fortunate to not have any permanent problems but I still physically recovering. Mentally I am very down. I have trained hard this summer for a 124 mile ride in September but now I have zero motivation to get back on the bike. Self-pity? Rationalization (fat and 50)? Just plan scared? Yes to all of these. My ego is very angry and just chewing me up when ever I get near my bike. I am hoping to get back on this weekend and I just don't think I am ready for serious long rides. It needs to be fun. -
We have all met the "man with the hammer" (bonking).

In a week or so you will feel better and be back on your bike.

Just take it easy for a while, no point in killing yourself.
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Old 08-09-12, 08:18 PM
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Sounds like you cooked yourself pretty good. Take a few days off with good nutrition, hydration and rest. A medical checkup is not a bad idea either. When you get back on the bike, take it easy for the first few rides.
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Old 08-09-12, 09:52 PM
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Been there done that, it is no fun. But you won't know what your limits are without testing them. Recover and get back out there.
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Old 08-10-12, 07:30 AM
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Sorry, but not a wise way to test one's limits. It very well could have been fatal. And he didn't "bonk." He was completely dehydrated and sufferng from heat stroke. ("I never started sweating again, I was chilled and about 10 miles later I stopped and I could hardly see the road. I pulled into a grassy spot on the side of the road and callapsed.") Don't confuse the two. They are completely different and have different consequences.

BTW..Drinking too much Gatorade can actually prevent the absorbtion of water into your system.
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Old 08-10-12, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by BusterMcFly
My name is Bryan and I am a clyde... My last ride damn near killed me from heat stroke. I allowed my ego to get the best of me and I wouldn't give up till I was in dire straights. I was on a 90 mile training ride on Saturday and it turned out to be one of the hottest days of the year.
Exactly how hot was it? Heat stroke isn't something to be taken lightly. It can cause permanent damage to the organs and brain. It also makes it that much more likely to happen in the future. Once you stop sweating it's way too late for a bottle of gatorade and a little rest, it's time to phone someone for a ride and call it a day. Some people may handle heat better than others, but it can happen to anyone, regardless of age or fitness. You're not getting any training benefit from trying to push through dehydration, it's only going to set you back. Just be happy that you don't have any permanent issues, get back on the bike and be smarter about the heat the next time.
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Old 08-10-12, 08:22 AM
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Never mess around with chills on a hot ride. IME, that's the first sign of impending shutdown of your systems. Dangerous territory to try to push through.
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Old 08-10-12, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by BusterMcFly
My name is Bryan and I am a clyde... My last ride damn near killed me from heat stroke. I allowed my ego to get the best of me and I wouldn't give up till I was in dire straights. I was on a 90 mile training ride on Saturday and it turned out to be one of the hottest days of the year. I did well the first 25 miles. Maintained good hydration, watched my pace and really thought I had a chance. Then the heat came on and I was totally derailled. I had to walk some hills. Took me almost 3 hours to do the next 20 miles. The heat just sucked the life out of me. When I finally pulled into the last stop before the 30 miles back I bought 3 big bottles Gatorade and a bottle of h20. I sat on the curb for over an hour before I stopped sweating. Felt a bit better so off I went. I never started sweating again, I was chilled and about 10 miles later I stopped and I could hardly see the road. I pulled into a grassy spot on the side of the road and callapsed. At some point I called a friend told him where I thought I was but I have minimal memory of it. He was close enough to hear the the Yelm/Tenino race track in the back ground and he knew where I was. I was fortunate to not have any permanent problems but I still physically recovering. Mentally I am very down. I have trained hard this summer for a 124 mile ride in September but now I have zero motivation to get back on the bike. Self-pity? Rationalization (fat and 50)? Just plan scared? Yes to all of these. My ego is very angry and just chewing me up when ever I get near my bike. I am hoping to get back on this weekend and I just don't think I am ready for serious long rides. It needs to be fun. -
Personally I would have gone with 1 gatorade and 3 water. That much gatorade can have a bad effect on you, too much insulin all at once. Even after 2 bottles of that stuff I feel like throwing up.
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Old 08-10-12, 09:12 AM
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Thank you for all the help. I realize it was a rookie mistake (although I am not a rookie). Poor judgement isone of my finer qualities when it comes to stuff I want to do. One thing I didn't think of was pre-hydration. Going to slow down and enjoy the rides more. Just signed up for a metric century in Sept. Not going to push so hard to get to my goal. Thanks again...
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Old 08-10-12, 09:14 AM
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The following are my opinions formed over the last three years, and having done what you wrote and worse.

Things to consider.

Diet overall. If you do not intentionally restrict salt in your daily diet, you will have to manage your electrolytes all the more on your hot rides.

Gatoraid in my opinion does a poor job of this. I personally preder hammer endurolytes in either the capsule of fizzy tablet form. The capsules have no taste and can be taken with any drink, the tablet disolve in your water bottle and have a mild flavor. On very hot days and very long rides, i use the tablets, and use one for every bottle of water i consume. On other days i will use the capsules and maybe use them at the halfway point.

You have to stay hydrated generally in your day to day life...you cant simply drink poorly all week, get up one morning and drink a quart of water and call it good.

Also alcohol or extremely salty foods (pizza) the night before a big ride will have a major negative impact.

General conditioning...you cant go from 0 to 100 in anything in life...yet most of us try and then wonder why we fail.

Hydration and electrolyte management in general:

You cant get behind and ever expect to really catch up on a long hard ride. By the time the symptoms present themselves, your done.

Amount to drink...studies i have seen rate consumption / processing for most people between 16-28 oz per hour with some extreme cases going higher than that. Yes you can drink more, bit that introduces an entirely different set of problems. I am 216 lbs and i drink about one 24 oz bottle per hour. Usually at the halfway point i will get another 8-12 oz in me on really hot days.

Amount to eat...again its much easier to stay ahead of the bonk, than to ever recover from one...200-300 calories per hour during exercise is about all you can process. I personally use q combination of hammer gels and laura bars to meet my needs, but there are tons of choices. Again, in mynopinion using sugery drinks like gatoraid for this purpose is a mistake. My body feels great when i drink them, but crashes 20 minutes later.

On cooler rides i have simply done peanut butter sandwiches, but i just cant stand it when its hot.

Wrapping up...i have crashed on hikes, runs, and bike rides...yes many times. Once on a hike i honestly didnt think i was going to make it out. I had heat issues so bad i had to lie down under a rock, thenwhen i finally did get home, i had to sleep 3-4 hours just to feel sortmof normal again.

On every occassion, i have been able to go back and look at my food and hydration plan, and see where i screwed up. Each time when i followed my plan to the letter i was fine.

Learn from what you did, adapt your plan, and keep riding.

(i am also assuming you know your physical limits and are staying within in them....even following a proper fueling and hydration plan it is quite possible to bonk ifnyour exertion exceeds your capacity...and generally this capacity is reduced in high heat. Nothing wrong with slowing down your pace on hot days and taking frequent rest breaks to get in the shade.
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Old 08-10-12, 09:40 AM
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Whoa! Hold the Phone! "I was on a 90 mile training ride...." Give yourself some clyde-sized credit here. I'm 52 and not a clyde and 'bout wrecked myself on a 15 mile so called "training ride." 30 minutes in a cooling shower to start feeling like I wasn't burning up. Nowhere near the training level you are on.

Man you did good. Glad you are ok now, but like others have said, we've been there and it's a dangerous place to be. Now you have a recent reminder of what it feels like so next time you are out you can be more sensitive again to what your body is telling you. On a hike once one of our experienced hikers bonked big time. Anxiety, shakes, crying jags, total physical break down until we got her some quick energy and hydrated. Never want to see that again.

Another confirmation across different sports, this of chefissac's comment on pre - hydration the day before - on hikes the recommendation is plenty of water before bed and it works. It takes time to catch up so do the prep.

On helping the motivation: try this (if you are not already doing it) just poodle around the last 2 or so miles before the end of the ride. Since I started doing this I'm happy instead of wiped and ready to go again the next day.

addendum: +1 on vestorid's post. Good summary of everything I've read. Add Nuun tabs to your list of things to try, my boys swear by them. I get whatever is inexpensive w/o sugars or obvious stimulants. Before rides I'm eating light, One or two slice PBJ on others suggestions and works well for 1 - 2 hr rides.
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Old 08-10-12, 11:54 AM
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"Bonking" results from the depletion of glygogen, not dehydration.
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Old 08-10-12, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by indyfabz
"Bonking" results from the depletion of glygogen, not dehydration.
Agreed. I saw little in the OP to make me think the problem was bonking, but something far more dangerous.
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Old 08-10-12, 01:46 PM
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My read from having once had heat stroke is in fact heat stroke brought on by high temps and dehydration. Everyone is different and for me Gatorade works to supplement hydration, but not more than 32 oz. a day and usually only 16 oz. It really depends on several factors and sweat volume and salt (and other mineral) content matters. I've not had the issues with salty foods the day or days before being an issue. Alcohol on the other hand was an issue with my heat stroke as was sun tea and diet pop. Mine happened on a moderatly mild day but the two days leading up to it caused dehydration. It happened on a Monday right after lunch, Saturday had much to much alcohol to drink followed by Sunday drinking at least 2 48 oz diet pops and sun tea. Then Monday morning I only drank coffee and instead of starting to drink my normal amount of water about 11AM I started with a 48 oz pop. I post that just to show that dehydration is cumlative in nature so your best bet is to stay hydrated all of the time. Moniter your urine color to determine the hydration, keep it clear to pale yellow.

My advice to you Bryan follows others here. Give yourself time to fully recover from this then resume training but train smarter. Don't beat yourself up about making poor decisions while you were dehydrated, that is a symptom of what happened. By that point it is not like you had a choice. Educate and prepare for hydration as well as nutrition although of the two dehydration will kill you in less than a day if severe enough.
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Old 08-10-12, 02:32 PM
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A 90 mile training ride is quite a goal. Some one said that to fail can be glorious if the goal is high enough. Your goal was definitely high enough. Rest up for a few days and then go out for some easy riding. Make sure that when you start smiling that you don't go stupid and decide to crank it up. Remember easy ride.
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