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first week biking

Old 06-21-13, 10:33 PM
  #1  
Jimbojo
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first week biking

So after our first week riding I have to say my wife and I are hooked. We rode six of the seven days and did about 55 miles total, I know thats not alot, but we are both terribly out of shape. The most surprising thing to me is how much I have liked it, I have never looked forward to any kind of exercise but I do look forward to our rides very much. What is a good goal for newbies trying to build endurance?

Jimbo
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Old 06-21-13, 10:46 PM
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A good goal is more than you did last week. Don't think too hard about it, just do enough so that you love it. Cycling should be fun. if it becomes less fun, change your strategy.
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Old 06-22-13, 01:26 AM
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I think slowly working your way up is smart strategy. Main thing is have fun too.
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Old 06-22-13, 01:27 AM
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+1 to TrojanHorse. Work on extending each ride. Whatever works. You should come home pretty well wiped out occasionally. Can't keep that up each day...and you probably need two recovery days a week.... Ride at a comfortably challenging rate. At 9mph I'm guessing you're still in a "get really comfortable with the bike" mode and that's fine. Just keep riding and trying to make each ride a little further. The very first thing to do is to learn to spin a little faster and use a little less pedal pressure by spinning faster, not harder. A lot of us have lost a lot of weight and gained a great deal of physical fitness through riding, but I'll be that 90-100% of those of us that have been successful have had to combine that with better eating habits and take conscious care to not use cycling as an excuse to eat more... Very few clydes aren't on some quest to lose weight and get in better shape. I'm down 75lb and continuing. But understand, the exercise end of it really takes a big commitment in time, so while it's really, really important to make a real effort to push yourself further and further and eventually harder and harder when you ride so you continue to improve your fitness...it's more important that it be fun or you can't keep up the effort.
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Old 06-22-13, 05:46 AM
  #5  
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Originally Posted by Jimbojo View Post
So after our first week riding I have to say my wife and I are hooked. We rode six of the seven days and did about 55 miles total, I know thats not alot, but we are both terribly out of shape. The most surprising thing to me is how much I have liked it, I have never looked forward to any kind of exercise but I do look forward to our rides very much. What is a good goal for newbies trying to build endurance?

Jimbo
Good goal for newbies: Enjoy yourself.

Good goal for seasoned riders: Enjoy yourself.

The moment you start viewing cycling as exercise instead of leisure, your enthusiasm for cycling will screech to a halt. A few years ago my wife and I got into biking and the first bikes we bought were mountain bikes. We did a few group rides and found out very quickly what poor shape we were in, plus not really having the "optimal" bicycle for the roads. Then, we bought road bikes. It took only a few rides and poor experiences with motorists to decide we really didn't want to be on the public roads, group rides or otherwise. Not to mention, on road bikes we felt far more like we were just exercising than really actually enjoying ourselves.

We don't have a lot of trails nearby for mountain biking so we wound up riding the local bike path (which sucks...) on our roadies for the rest of the 2010 season. For the 2011 season, we simply weren't motivated and decided in 2012 we'd try to motivate ourselves. We'd been on one ride when someone rear-ended us at about 50-60 mph in stopped traffic and that brought our 2012 season to a close before it even got started. We also had our mountain bikes on the back of the car, which were also lost.

Since 2012 I'd been dying to get back on a mountain bike. We bought new mountain bikes back in February of this year and we've been getting out quite often. The road bikes have seen action ONCE. Why? Because we feel like we're exercising. When we get on our mountain bikes, our attitudes and demeanors change. We don't feel like we're exercising, we feel like we're having fun and on an adventure.

Anyway, before I get going on this huge rambling, your number one goal should be to have fun. The more fun you have, the less you're thinking about weight loss, and the more excited you'll be when you do lose the weight. Plain and simple, when you're having fun, you ride harder. You're not thinking about the burn in your legs, you're thinking about "going for it" and you're loving every minute of it. So, the harder you ride, the quicker you're going to lose the weight. Take my word for it, you will lose far more weight if you're having fun.

...And that's all I have to say on the subject.
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Old 06-22-13, 06:09 AM
  #6  
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While I don't exactly disagree with Wooden Tiger, I don't exactly agree with him either. Fun is great. Fun is AWESOME!

But for a lot of people, fun is not the best motivator to keep you out on the bike (or any other fitness/health related goal).

Now, to be sure I am NOT one of those "no pain, no gain" type of people... I think that is one of the stupidest sayings in the world... and the fact that so many fitness professionals believe in or at least adhere to that principle cost me YEARS of false starts in trying to get healthy.

Absolutely, riding the bike should be fun... but that doesn't mean you can't have other goals if you find them motivating. In fact, having goals - specific achievable goals - and sharing them with friends and family (and online on sites like this and on Facebook) is what got me from sedentary couch potato to now multi-sport endurance athlete.

But... recognize that you need to start small, make each goal achievable based on where you are at the moment and where you want to get to. Keep them small so that the achievement of each goal can help build confidence and momentum.

For me, the first goal was to get a black belt in taekwondo... a process I knew would take at least two years, but which was broken down into each of the color belts along the way. That was 2010 and most of 2011.

In early 2012, I had about 6 months left to get my black belt, so I started looking for another big goal... and decided I wanted to run a half marathon within the year. I started running in January 2012, finished my first HM in September, and ran 3 more before my first anniversary of running.

2013 has been about continuing to run, and now also about cycling... with a goal to ride a century ride charity event next month.

I'm sitting here this morning planning out a 70 - 80 mile ride route for the week after next as my last tune-up before the big event and I'm shaking my head because I would NEVER have thought it would be possible for me to do that... and 3 years ago it WASN'T possible, but what's not possible today is sometimes possible tomorrow if we set goals and work at it.

My big, audacious goals are still out there... three of them keep me motivated for the long term, but I have lots of small steps to get there in between... those goals are 1) Run a full marathon 2) Complete a half-ironman length duathlon (3.3 mile run/56 mile bike/13.1 mile run) 4) Someday complete the Walt Disney World Dopey Challenge (5k race/10k race/ half marathon/ marathon on consecutive days)

Along the way, weight loss was a secondary goal. I never set an ultimate weight loss target (I still don't really have one... though somewhere in the low 2hundred-teens seems like it will make the most sense). At first the weight came off very slowly... then it accelerated greatly and I lost a lot very quickly for quite a while in 2012... it then plateaued but has held steady for most of 2013 so far. As I train up for the century and my next HM, my eating is getting a bit more focused on good sports nutrition, which naturally improves my overall caloric intake... and a few pounds have started to drop back off. I'd like to be under 230 by the time of my next HM in september... and maybe at 220 by the end of the year, but that is not my main motivation.

I go into all of this detail to point out that goals can help keep you focused, but the goals shouldn't just be about the number on the scale or how far or fast you ride. Try to make the goals themselves about achieving something new and different, and then the goals themselves can be fun.

If you are so inclined just go with small increases in your overall weekly riding and/or your long ride for a few weeks... then when you get some more experience, maybe look out 2 to 3 months and find a local charity ride and pick a distance you'd like to try to train for and then set that as a goal. You'll be surprised at what you can do and as long as you don't take yourself too seriously, you can have fun along the way.

Good luck... keep it up and you'll be amazed how far you can go (both literally and figuratively).

Ted

Last edited by wombat94; 06-22-13 at 08:35 AM. Reason: Dropped "t"s from "event" twice.
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Old 06-22-13, 06:12 AM
  #7  
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Im proud of you Jimbojo. For me biking has been life changing. I like to get high and used to drink a lot but now I get high from biking.
It helpfs me deal with anxiety = after an hour on the bike I dont worry so much.

Charlie
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Old 06-22-13, 06:56 AM
  #8  
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Originally Posted by wombat94 View Post
While I don't exactly disagree with Wooden Tiger, I don't exactly agree with him either. Fun is great. Fun is AWESOME!

But for a lot of people, fun is not the best motivator to keep you out on the bike (or any other fitness/health related goal).

Now, to be sure I am NOT one of those "no pain, no gain" type of people... I think that is one of the stupidest sayings in the world... and the fact that so many fitness professionals believe in or at least adhere to that principle cost me YEARS of false starts in trying to get healthy.

Absolutely, riding the bike should be fun... but that doesn't mean you can't have other goals if you find them motivating. In fact, having goals - specific achievable goals - and sharing them with friends and family (and online on sites like this and on Facebook) is what got me from sedentary couch potato to now multi-sport endurance athlete.

But... recognize that you need to start small, make each goal achievable based on where you are at the moment and where you want to get to. Keep them small so that the achievement of each goal can help build confidence and momentum.

For me, the first goal was to get a black belt in taekwondo... a process I knew would take at least two years, but which was broken down into each of the color belts along the way. That was 2010 and most of 2011.

In early 2012, I had about 6 months left to get my black belt, so I started looking for another big goal... and decided I wanted to run a half marathon within the year. I started running in January 2012, finished my first HM in September, and ran 3 more before my first anniversary of running.

2013 has been about continuing to run, and now also about cycling... with a goal to ride a century ride charity even next month.

I'm sitting here this morning planning out a 70 - 80 mile ride route for the week after next as my last tune-up before the big even and I'm shaking my head because I would NEVER have thought it would be possible for me to do that... and 3 years ago it WASN'T possible, but what's not possible today is sometimes possible tomorrow if we set goals and work at it.

My big, audacious goals are still out there... three of them keep me motivated for the long term, but I have lots of small steps to get there in between... those goals are 1) Run a full marathon 2) Complete a half-ironman length duathlon (3.3 mile run/56 mile bike/13.1 mile run) 4) Someday complete the Walt Disney World Dopey Challenge (5k race/10k race/ half marathon/ marathon on consecutive days)

Along the way, weight loss was a secondary goal. I never set an ultimate weight loss target (I still don't really have one... though somewhere in the low 2hundred-teens seems like it will make the most sense). At first the weight came off very slowly... then it accelerated greatly and I lost a lot very quickly for quite a while in 2012... it then plateaued but has held steady for most of 2013 so far. As I train up for the century and my next HM, my eating is getting a bit more focused on good sports nutrition, which naturally improves my overall caloric intake... and a few pounds have started to drop back off. I'd like to be under 230 by the time of my next HM in september... and maybe at 220 by the end of the year, but that is not my main motivation.

I go into all of this detail to point out that goals can help keep you focused, but the goals shouldn't just be about the number on the scale or how far or fast you ride. Try to make the goals themselves about achieving something new and different, and then the goals themselves can be fun.

If you are so inclined just go with small increases in your overall weekly riding and/or your long ride for a few weeks... then when you get some more experience, maybe look out 2 to 3 months and find a local charity ride and pick a distance you'd like to try to train for and then set that as a goal. You'll be surprised at what you can do and as long as you don't take yourself too seriously, you can have fun along the way.

Good luck... keep it up and you'll be amazed how far you can go (both literally and figuratively).

Ted
But here's the thing, Ted. When you're having fun, you naturally develop goals! "Hey, I'm gonna climb that hill in 20 seconds," or "Okay, I climbed the small hill the last time, let's see if I can climb the big hill!" The more FUN you're having, the more motivation you have.

When you're on an adrenaline rush, you push harder. For example, I'm not the most radical mountain biker in the world, and I don't take a lot of chances, but last weekend the weather was nothing short of beautiful, I was on an AWESOME single-track trail, and I was just living for the moment. I was taking chances and pushing my boundaries far beyond what I probably should have been, and it was downright AWESOME. I was having a great time and found myself climbing terrain where I'd normally take one look at it and feel defeated before I even gave it a shot. I found myself navigating some terrain I normally would have slowed down for and said, "Oh, no, no way in hell am I going through that sweeper at full speed!" Simply put, I didn't care. It was just a moment of pure nirvana...until my pedal broke in half and brought my day to a close.
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Old 06-22-13, 07:03 AM
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Jimbojo, the only thing I agree with Wooden Tiger about is that you should do what you enjoy. That is different for everyone. Unlike him, I do want to be on the public roads with the traffic, I do want to be on a road bike, I do want to feel that I am exercising, I do want to set specific goals for performance.

People's ideas differ as to what constitutes fun.

If you want to build your endurance, the answer couldn't be simpler. Just ride more. In the early stages, you will see rapid gains in fitness just by spending more time on the bike - distance builds speed, the old pros used to say, and they were, in general, right. If you want to push yourself a bit, that's fine, ride at a tempo that has you breathing deeply instead of just meandering along. But just ride, and enjoy the ride. Speaking for myself, returning to cycling when I approached my fiftieth birthday has made a massive contribution to both my physical and mental health. In the nine years since then I have probably ridden more than 60000 miles, and don't regret a mile of it.
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Old 06-22-13, 07:25 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
Jimbojo, the only thing I agree with Wooden Tiger about is that you should do what you enjoy. That is different for everyone. Unlike him, I do want to be on the public roads with the traffic, I do want to be on a road bike, I do want to feel that I am exercising, I do want to set specific goals for performance.

People's ideas differ as to what constitutes fun.

If you want to build your endurance, the answer couldn't be simpler. Just ride more. In the early stages, you will see rapid gains in fitness just by spending more time on the bike - distance builds speed, the old pros used to say, and they were, in general, right. If you want to push yourself a bit, that's fine, ride at a tempo that has you breathing deeply instead of just meandering along. But just ride, and enjoy the ride. Speaking for myself, returning to cycling when I approached my fiftieth birthday has made a massive contribution to both my physical and mental health. In the nine years since then I have probably ridden more than 60000 miles, and don't regret a mile of it.
I'm not saying everybody's idea of fun should be my idea of fun. Some people have fun at insurance seminars, while personally, I'd be sure not to leave my pillow and blanket in the car. Some people do enjoy exercising, and if feeling like exercising is what makes the OP happy, then by all means! What I'm saying is NOBODY enjoys feeling like he/she is doing a chore. If you feel like you're doing a chore, you're not going to put your best effort forward. A positive attitude/mentality will net you far greater results than a negative one...every single time.

For you, you like road riding. For me, I loathe it. Because of that, I have absolutely no ambition or "drive" to go out there and put forth my best efforts doing it. For you, obviously you do. It's simply a matter how an individual approaches something. Personally, when I'm on a bike, I don't have any goals for myself until I'm "in the moment." I don't just leave for a ride and say to myself, "Okay, I'm gonna climb 20 hills," etc. For me, my goals when I get on a bike are a "spur of the moment" type deal. My goals depend on the terrain and my surroundings. I could ride the same trails on five separate occasions and each time my goals will probably be different.
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Old 06-22-13, 07:52 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by Jimbojo View Post
What is a good goal for newbies trying to build endurance?

Jimbo
Try making a game of it with your wife. Maybe see who can ride up the biggest hill in town. Race each other home and whoever loses makes dinner. Buy cycling computers and whoever has the fastest time or rode the most for the week gets a day to do whatever.

I agree with a lot of posters in saying it should be fun, enjoyable, and maybe a little competitive .
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Old 06-22-13, 08:11 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by exile View Post
Try making a game of it with your wife. Maybe see who can ride up the biggest hill in town. Race each other home and whoever loses makes dinner. Buy cycling computers and whoever has the fastest time or rode the most for the week gets a day to do whatever.

I agree with a lot of posters in saying it should be fun, enjoyable, and maybe a little competitive .
I'm most certainly enjoying the added benefits of being on a bike, but those added benefits aren't my motivation for riding. Yeah, I'm losing weight, getting in shape, and all that good stuff, but FOR ME, all those added health benefits are secondaries. I think of it as eating my vegetables (I HATE vegetables...) and being unable to taste them.
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Old 06-22-13, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Wooden Tiger View Post
What I'm saying is NOBODY enjoys feeling like he/she is doing a chore. If you feel like you're doing a chore, you're not going to put your best effort forward. A positive attitude/mentality will net you far greater results than a negative one...every single time.
THIS I can agree with 100%!

All I'm saying is having some specific, measurable goal to achieve (ride a certain distance, participate in a specific event, etc) does not have to equate to being a chore for everyone... don't shy away from having a goal if you think it will help motivate you... then the goal AND the riding can BOTH be achievements.
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Old 06-22-13, 09:45 AM
  #14  
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55 miles in your first week is great! I think the best way for a new cyclist to build endurance is to make one ride a week your long ride, and gradually increase how long it is. If all your rides have been the same length, you're riding 9 miles - next week make one ride 10 miles, then 11 or 12, while keeping the others the same length. That's what I did, both running and cycling.

You might take 2 days a week off, to give your muscles a chance to recover, or at least make a couple of your rides easier than the others.

After you've built up a good base, you can work on getting faster, if you want to. But there's no rule that says you have to get faster. For many years I was content to be a pokey cyclist. This year I decided to get faster (relatively speaking!), because it lets me go on longer rides while still returning home at a reasonable time.
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Old 06-22-13, 12:49 PM
  #15  
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Wow, guys great responses, I really value what everyone had to say. A little more background, I will be turning 49 in a few days and my wife will be 40 in a month, I am 5'8" and right now running 235, but that is 10 lbs down from my peak weight about 6 weeks ago, when my wife and I made some pretty drastic changes to our diet, (cut out fast food, starch processed carbs, cheese and butter, oh and sugary drinks) almost a paleo kinda thing but not 100% regimented.

Another big life change for us is that our youngest just graduated high school and will be leaving to college in the fall (he also bikes and pushed my wife and I to ride). Our middle son leaves to the Navy in October, so we are soon to be empty nesters.

With my sons encouragement we bought bikes foremost for the fitness aspect, just to get us of the dang couch, and we hoped it would be a fun activity/exercise that we would enjoy doing together. The key is the doing together, with these changes my wife really needs me more than ever and having a shared activity, other than parenting is just what we needed. So seeing my wifes mood pick up over this last week has been awesome, and I am really surprised at how much both of us really like it.

So, back to biking, we have been varying our rides, Sat morn, being our long ride day, we did 17 miles today, up 3 miles from last week. We have also been doing shorter rides in the evenings 6 to 10 miles depending on when we can start, (my wife is a nurse so 12 hour shifts). But we bought lights so if we stay out past sunset we are ok. Our average speed on the bike trail is about 12 mph, but on the streets usually 9 to 10 (more hills and stops). We are lucky to live in a town that is very bike friendly so tons of trails.

Now I really like the goal of building up to a charity ride of some sorts, and I also cant quit watching cyclocross videos, so long term may be to try that in a year or so. i also like the competitive idea, my wife is very competitive so that would be a great motivator. Any way sorry for the long winded reply, but I was very inspired by all of your comments.

Jimbo
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Old 06-22-13, 12:58 PM
  #16  
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the bug strikes another. Welcome to the club, oh and it's normal to go to the LBS every other week for "stuff". Your wife will get used it
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Old 06-22-13, 01:00 PM
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Keep it FUN.

Ride as much as you want.

Rest when you need days off.

You will become stronger each week.

Ask questions when you begin to have problems.
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Old 06-22-13, 04:52 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by Jimbojo View Post
Wow, guys great responses, I really value what everyone had to say. A little more background, I will be turning 49 in a few days and my wife will be 40 in a month, I am 5'8" and right now running 235, but that is 10 lbs down from my peak weight about 6 weeks ago, when my wife and I made some pretty drastic changes to our diet, (cut out fast food, starch processed carbs, cheese and butter, oh and sugary drinks) almost a paleo kinda thing but not 100% regimented.

Another big life change for us is that our youngest just graduated high school and will be leaving to college in the fall (he also bikes and pushed my wife and I to ride). Our middle son leaves to the Navy in October, so we are soon to be empty nesters.

With my sons encouragement we bought bikes foremost for the fitness aspect, just to get us of the dang couch, and we hoped it would be a fun activity/exercise that we would enjoy doing together. The key is the doing together, with these changes my wife really needs me more than ever and having a shared activity, other than parenting is just what we needed. So seeing my wifes mood pick up over this last week has been awesome, and I am really surprised at how much both of us really like it.

So, back to biking, we have been varying our rides, Sat morn, being our long ride day, we did 17 miles today, up 3 miles from last week. We have also been doing shorter rides in the evenings 6 to 10 miles depending on when we can start, (my wife is a nurse so 12 hour shifts). But we bought lights so if we stay out past sunset we are ok. Our average speed on the bike trail is about 12 mph, but on the streets usually 9 to 10 (more hills and stops). We are lucky to live in a town that is very bike friendly so tons of trails.

Now I really like the goal of building up to a charity ride of some sorts, and I also cant quit watching cyclocross videos, so long term may be to try that in a year or so. i also like the competitive idea, my wife is very competitive so that would be a great motivator. Any way sorry for the long winded reply, but I was very inspired by all of your comments.

Jimbo
It's far more enjoyable to ride with a partner. When I ride alone, the ride tends to "last forever," plus it gives way too much time to focus on whether I'm tired, my rear is sore, etc. By having someone to ride with, things just seem to go much quicker and focus seems to be aimed towards conversation instead.
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Old 06-22-13, 07:54 PM
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Jarrett2
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I started a month ago. I'm a techy/numbers guy. So what motivates me is using a free app on my smart phone to track my rides. Then on my next ride, I think pick some aspect of the last ride (distance, average speed, peak speed, etc) and think to myself, "I'm going to beat that today"

Keeps it fun and fresh to me. Doing my first 20 mile ride in the morning (with my daughter) to beat our previous 15 mile record

But sometimes its fun just to take my dog and do a 2-3 mile ride with her at 6 mph. She LOVES it. Anytime I touch my bike in my garage, she starts jumping and barking towards the road looking back at me like, "Let's go!"
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Old 06-22-13, 08:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
I started a month ago. I'm a techy/numbers guy. So what motivates me is using a free app on my smart phone to track my rides. Then on my next ride, I think pick some aspect of the last ride (distance, average speed, peak speed, etc) and think to myself, "I'm going to beat that today"

Keeps it fun and fresh to me. Doing my first 20 mile ride in the morning (with my daughter) to beat our previous 15 mile record

But sometimes its fun just to take my dog and do a 2-3 mile ride with her at 6 mph. She LOVES it. Anytime I touch my bike in my garage, she starts jumping and barking towards the road looking back at me like, "Let's go!"
I've kinda become motivated with using Strava.
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Old 06-22-13, 09:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Wooden Tiger View Post
It's far more enjoyable to ride with a partner. When I ride alone, the ride tends to "last forever," plus it gives way too much time to focus on whether I'm tired, my rear is sore, etc. By having someone to ride with, things just seem to go much quicker and focus seems to be aimed towards conversation instead.
It's striking how people differ. I love long solo rides. But I get into a kind of meditative frame of mind where I focus on the here and now--the wind in the trees, the birds chirping; even the grinding up hills, the pelting rain, the aching thighs are a good part of the experience, not just in retrospect but even at the time. The exception is if I've started out too fast; then I suffer a lot.

I do like riding with others, not that I've done it much other than with my wife. I was a little weirded out a couple weeks ago when a rider I didn't know, a guy who looked to be in his 50s, complimented me on my legs as he rode past me on a hill. I'm a guy in my mid-40s, and I don't think my legs are that hot, especially since I don't shave them (and I'm 25 lbs. overweight)!
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Old 06-23-13, 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by brianogilvie View Post
It's striking how people differ. I love long solo rides. But I get into a kind of meditative frame of mind where I focus on the here and now--the wind in the trees, the birds chirping; even the grinding up hills, the pelting rain, the aching thighs are a good part of the experience, not just in retrospect but even at the time. The exception is if I've started out too fast; then I suffer a lot.

I do like riding with others, not that I've done it much other than with my wife. I was a little weirded out a couple weeks ago when a rider I didn't know, a guy who looked to be in his 50s, complimented me on my legs as he rode past me on a hill. I'm a guy in my mid-40s, and I don't think my legs are that hot, especially since I don't shave them (and I'm 25 lbs. overweight)!
I won't say I never like taking a solo ride, because I do. I can certainly appreciate all the finer things nature has to offer. I'm just saying because of the quietness of the ride, it feels like I'm riding far longer than I really am, plus I always seem to ride further with a partner and wind up feeling less tired after the ride. Maybe it's a matter of riding harder when I'm alone, I'm not sure.

Recently I got a cellphone holder that goes on the handlebars. Since my iPhone doubles as an iPod, I can listen to music when I ride, so that kinda "breaks things up" a bit.
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Old 06-25-13, 05:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Wooden Tiger View Post
I'm just saying because of the quietness of the ride, it feels like I'm riding far longer than I really am, plus I always seem to ride further with a partner and wind up feeling less tired after the ride. Maybe it's a matter of riding harder when I'm alone, I'm not sure.
That seems plausible. When I ride with a slower partner, I can go a lot longer, because I deliberately take it easy. And when I'm riding with any partner, I tend to stop more often.

On the other hand, there's nothing like riding with a much stronger partner to make me feel really tired at the end of a ride!
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Old 06-25-13, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by brianogilvie View Post
That seems plausible. When I ride with a slower partner, I can go a lot longer, because I deliberately take it easy. And when I'm riding with any partner, I tend to stop more often.

On the other hand, there's nothing like riding with a much stronger partner to make me feel really tired at the end of a ride!
Understandable. I always wind up stopping, too, usually because one of us has to stop for some reason.
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Old 06-25-13, 06:45 PM
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You're hooked, congratulations and welcome to BF! Just keep riding, you'll figure it all out.
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