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Opinion on Charity Ride training

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Opinion on Charity Ride training

Old 07-01-13, 02:53 PM
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LongT
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Opinion on Charity Ride training

I am getting ready for the MS City to Shore ride, Cherry Hill, NJ to Ocean City, NJ. I am slowly increasing my mile. I currently ride about 22 miles 4 days per week. On weekends I ride about 32 miles and upping that to 35-40 this weekend. I figure by the end of Sept I'll be ready for the 75 miles each day of the ride.

I'm just wondering, for those that have ridden a Charity Ride, how much training do you think the average rider puts in. What percentage train seriously versus just gut it out on the weekend and suffer on Monday.

If you would like to sponsor me my donation page is in my sig. Probably have to cut and paste it as I don't think there is a link there.

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Old 07-01-13, 03:48 PM
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Everyone is bit different and different levels. How do you feel after you do your long ride, can you do another of the same distance the next day?

I'd go by time in the saddle oppose to a mile number. If you're doing about 5-6 hrs now per week, aim for 5-6 hours during the week plus a 3-4hr long weekend ride.

If you can't ride that long time constraints, the other option that works well is high intensity training, HARD efforts for shorter duration, say hard 2hrs oppose to getting in a long 4 at mellow pace. You will learn your pain cave well, and this will help your active recovery. Which will make you more fit, faster and lower your HR at normal efforts. It works well for endurance level rides as well. When I was training for my MTB Death March, most of my training rides were only 2-3hrs, though I knew the race ride time will be in the 7hr range.
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Old 07-01-13, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by jsigone View Post
Everyone is bit different and different levels. How do you feel after you do your long ride, can you do another of the same distance the next day?

I'd go by time in the saddle oppose to a mile number. If you're doing about 5-6 hrs now per week, aim for 5-6 hours during the week plus a 3-4hr long weekend ride.

If you can't ride that long time constraints, the other option that works well is high intensity training, HARD efforts for shorter duration, say hard 2hrs oppose to getting in a long 4 at mellow pace. You will learn your pain cave well, and this will help your active recovery. Which will make you more fit, faster and lower your HR at normal efforts. It works well for endurance level rides as well. When I was training for my MTB Death March, most of my training rides were only 2-3hrs, though I knew the race ride time will be in the 7hr range.
I think that I worded this incorrectly. I think that I am on track with my training. Thanks for the training advice though.

I currently ride 32 miles on Saturday and again on Sunday. I could ride farther as I feel fine after the 32 miles. This weekend I plan on 35-40 miles on both Saturday and Sunday. Back when I raced our club coach said for me probably training 80% of the race distance would be fine. If I get to 60 miles 2 days in a row I think I'll be fine.

I guess I was just wondering, in general, if most other riders actually train for charity rides. Like I see teams listed of fairly large numbers of riders. Are all of these people out training 6 days/week? Most are probably casual riders generally. Or do they use the charity ride more as a social thing. Like take all day riding slowly and long rest breaks. I fully expect to finish in under 5 hours. My current average speed for the 32 miles is 15.8 mph.

Probably still not worded correctly. I never was very good in English class!

Bill

Last edited by LongT; 07-01-13 at 05:03 PM.
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Old 07-01-13, 05:25 PM
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I train so I don't get dropped by my friends as bad or at least I can dish some back on other parts of the ride. I think those are more socailable rides for sure pending group of course. I'm one of those weird people that will ride a century just cus I thought it was a good idea the day before. I'm better at endurance then power, slow twitch vs fast twitch muscle.

the problem I have with riding or even suggesting someone to ride 6 days a week at given efforts is you will be burnt out before or right after the event is done. Iduno about your mental capacity but I can only stare at the painted white lines for so long, or ride the same single track on my MTB over and over so X amount of time. The way I deal with the painted lines is just ride as fast as I can w/o blowing up for the amount of time my infant baby lets me out of the house for. Be it 1 hour or 8hrs.
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Old 07-01-13, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by jsigone View Post
I train so I don't get dropped by my friends
Yeah great for you. Then you go DO the dropping! On a faux single speed!

My guess is that many riders can do a 100 mile ride without any significant alteration to their normal training regimen. I did 3 centuries earlier this year with no specific training but plenty of miles in my legs (although that may explain why jsigone was able to smoke me and the rest of our little group even though his shifter was broken!). I used to get all worked up about those "train for a century" guides that have you riding X on day 1, Y on day 2 etc... my ride calendar isn't flexible enough to accommodate all those rides so I just have to make do.

One of the more important things to figure out (for me at least) is how to finish a ride that long. Debug any fit issues you may have, figure out what and how you're going to eat and drink on your ride and make sure your kiester is conditioned to let you complete a ride of that length.

SO I think people "train" but not necessarily in a regimented manner... if that makes sense.
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Old 07-01-13, 09:20 PM
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If you are already riding 4 days a week and your long weekend ride is 30, you already have a good training base. Just increase your weekend ride to 40, then 50, then 60. Then you'll be ready for 75. No big deal, no special "training" is needed. You just need to increase your long ride time.
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Old 07-02-13, 06:46 AM
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I'm with Larry, just keep putting in base miles and increase your weekly long ride 5-10 miles each week until you are doing 70+. Charity rides are not competitive (at least not officially) so you don't have to train like you would for a race or an A group ride. If the going gets tough, you can slow down a bit or spend a few more minutes at the rest stops with no penalty. Have fun, you'll see riders of all levels at these events. Train enough that you can finish without sucking wind or living on Ibuprofen for the next few days.
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Old 07-02-13, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by LarryMelman View Post
If you are already riding 4 days a week and your long weekend ride is 30, you already have a good training base. Just increase your weekend ride to 40, then 50, then 60. Then you'll be ready for 75. No big deal, no special "training" is needed. You just need to increase your long ride time.
+1.

Having done the event 21 consecutive years, I can tell you that there will be many riders who don't ride as much as you are planning to ride. (One long-time participant doesn't ride at all outside of the event.) You may see some of those riders walking up the second bridge into Oacean City. One reason many don't train as much as others is that many only ride the first day. As you will undoubtedly see, the second day has far fewer riders. One person at the MS Society once guesstimated that fewer than half now ride the second day. It's impossible to get a firm grip on the number because many people get rides home from family members as opposed to taking the busses back. The smaller crowd on Sunday makes riding conditions so much better.

The best piece of advice I can give you that's non-safety related is to ride within yourself. Do not get caught up in the excitement and latch on to pacelines that are moving way above what you are used to. If you do, you run the risk of burning yourself out later in the ride and possibly injuring yourself. There is typically a lot of headwind after the stop in Mays Landing. The first year I did the event I shared a room for a bit with a young kid who rode "above his means." He wore himself out trying to keep up with faster riders and messed up his knee. He called his parents, who made the long drive from Scraton to pick him up.

Arrive extremely early unless you like sitting in traffic for possibly up to 1 hr. I have the luxury of living in the city, so I can take the train to the start, which is what the GF and I have been doing the last few years. I put up many of the safety signs along the course the day before the event. I leave a car and bags at the start and take the train back into town. That way, I have transportation home on Sunday and our bags are already at the start. When I would dive to the start, I would usually arrive at the start at 4:15 a.m. to get beat the traffic and get a parking spot close to Sunday's finsih line.

Skip the first stop if you can. The second stop (the "lunch stop') is not much farther. Maybe 10 miles or so. Skipping the first stop lets you leap frog over a lot of riders. The roads are oftent very crowded before the lunch stop. The more people you can leave behind the better. While re-fueling and hydrating are important, don't linger at stops. The time adds up and you legs can get "cold."
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Old 07-02-13, 09:37 AM
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Everyone's giving the OP training advice, which is not what he asked for. He's wondering if the "average" charity rider tends to train for these events or not.

This may seem painfully obvious, but IMO, riders who tend to train in general will train for the event, or will already have been in training. Riders who don't tend to train will be a mixed bag. Some will train, but there will always be a bunch who don't.
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Old 07-02-13, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by CraigB View Post
Everyone's giving the OP training advice, which is not what he asked for. He's wondering if the "average" charity rider tends to train for these events or not.

This may seem painfully obvious, but IMO, riders who tend to train in general will train for the event, or will already have been in training. Riders who don't tend to train will be a mixed bag. Some will train, but there will always be a bunch who don't.
Good point on the original question:

Some people train, some people don't. I did a 50 MS ride in May and it was early in the season without much time to build back up.
2 things to note:
1) when I see someone on the same 50 mile ride, with a single speed beach cruiser and their kid on a 20" BMX bike, I don't think they are doing much training, but they do the ride slow and steady.
2) charity rides are very different then a typical single or club ride due to the number of stops. On the MS ride we had 3 stops in the route. Longer rides have more stops, give you time to recoupe and refuel. On a club ride, a 50 mile ride would have 1 stop in the middle.
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Old 07-02-13, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by CraigB View Post
Everyone's giving the OP training advice, which is not what he asked for. He's wondering if the "average" charity rider tends to train for these events or not.

This may seem painfully obvious, but IMO, riders who tend to train in general will train for the event, or will already have been in training. Riders who don't tend to train will be a mixed bag. Some will train, but there will always be a bunch who don't.
I have done charity rides where I have talked to people at the start who claimed to be on their second or third ride over five miles. . . ever. Don't know how they did, but passed one near the start going up a 6% grade slogging hard in a really high gear.

Like Trojan Horse said above, I got into all that "Train for a Century" hype, but fell off it when life got in the way, and just did longer and longer rides as fit into my life. Did my first metric (4200ft gain) 6/1. Will be doing my first full C in October (6k+ gain). My road bike has a 12-32 MTB Cassette.
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Old 07-02-13, 10:57 AM
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I train for specific events however I've not done a multi-day charity event. Last year I did the STP; 204 miles over two days and most of my training was aimed at surviving it. Of three of us that were riding together two of us trained while the third did not, at least not enough because she had to abandon on day two. My guess judging by all the folks I was passing on every hill is that many did not train. I have also heard from others that sadly the majority of riders do not train for large events, however no actual evidence was presented.

LongT perhaps if you asked "do you and most of your team train for charity rides" then you might get more folks actually answering the question you are asking. CraigB and I seem to understand the question though.
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Old 07-02-13, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by justin_nj View Post
Longer rides have more stops, give you time to recoupe and refuel.
Yeah. The City to Shore he's training for has 4 full service rest stops and 1 additional water stop near the end of each day. Overkill for me unless it's very hot and/or humid, but helpful for the large number of people who are doing something like that for the first time.

I think Craig assessment is accurate. For example, I know of one large team that holds regular training rides for the event. I ride with a coporate team. A few people train. Most just ride their bikes like they would if they were not going to participate in the event. I don't train because I can do (and have done) the 78 flat miles hungover, and I don't try to do it as fast as possible.

OP: You have to understand that there could be over 7,000 people riding the first day. The range of ability and preparedness will be great. There will be people who have to be prodded out of rest stops by the sweep riders or even bussed further into the route or to the finish. There will also be people like a guy on my team one year who rode the entire second day with only one quick stop for water and to take a leak.
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Old 07-02-13, 04:26 PM
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Thanks for all the replies. I had already decided on my training schedule. It agrees with the majority. I'll just up my mileage on weekend days until I hit the 60 each or so and be happy with that.

I figured there would be a lot of people that didn't train. I guess I was just thinking that I am putting a lot of time into this and was wondering if I'm in the minority with a somewhat structured training regimen.

Bill
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Old 07-02-13, 04:37 PM
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The problem in answering your question is that the non-trainers will come in two varieties. There'll be those who don't trainfor the event because they aren't regular cyclists and don't really know what to expect, and there'll be those who don't train for the event because they are regular cyclists and routinely do the distances involved, so "training" isn't required.

Similarly, the trainers will divide into those who need to train to ensure they can finish in reasonable comfort, and those who train because they are treating it as a race and want to finish in the fastest time.
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Old 07-02-13, 06:10 PM
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Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
The problem in answering your question is that the non-trainers will come in two varieties. There'll be those who don't trainfor the event because they aren't regular cyclists and don't really know what to expect, and there'll be those who don't train for the event because they are regular cyclists and routinely do the distances involved, so "training" isn't required.

Similarly, the trainers will divide into those who need to train to ensure they can finish in reasonable comfort, and those who train because they are treating it as a race and want to finish in the fastest time.
+1. Count me in the cateogory for non-trainers because I commute a lot and am busy. But I've been on a number of rides in the past and just volunteered to be a sweep rider hauling all sorts of stuff and didn't have a problem. I guess I ride enough and keep my bikes in good enough condition and have a variety to choose from so I have the appropriate bike for the ride.
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