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Went for my first ride today! - Too short to really count

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Went for my first ride today! - Too short to really count

Old 07-29-14, 06:33 PM
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Went for my first ride today! - Too short to really count

Took my "new" bike out today for the first time. Only did a mile, as I was just trying to get the hang of shifting and all of that fun stuff. I did manage to knock the chain off, I think I hit the wrong way on the shifter, can't really see them when I'm riding I may have to adjust that.

It doesn't feel like it shifts very smoothly, got caught up once and I had to flip it back to the previous gear then to where I wanted to be. Maybe my buddy screwed me on the sale.... lol is that something that a tune-up at a bike shop would help? I also have to figure out a way to get my seat to stay locked in place. I had it raised a bit and when I got home I noticed it was sitting as low as it goes. I guess the little flipclip that holds it in place wasn't meant for 310lbs..
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Old 07-29-14, 06:47 PM
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Heck yes it counts! I track every inch!

Post some pictures of your new ride!
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Old 07-29-14, 06:56 PM
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Just a quick picture I took this afternoon. I bought a cage for a water bottle but the screws aren't long enough to hold it on.
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Old 07-29-14, 07:17 PM
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You should just have to tighten that seat post clamp. Flip the lever and tighten it a bit and reclamp. I'm sure the gears can be adjusted. Good luck with the new bike!!

Bill
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Old 07-29-14, 07:18 PM
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Originally Posted by LongT
You should just have to tighten that seat post clamp. Flip the lever and tighten it a bit and reclamp. I'm sure the gears can be adjusted. Good luck with the new bike!!

Bill
I'll have to look into that tomorrow, I may bite the bullet and bring it in for a tune-up. Gonna do some reading and see what generally that entails. Even having only done a mile, I could feel it in my legs in places that I don't feel from walking or doing the workouts I used to do. Felt good!
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Old 07-29-14, 07:58 PM
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That seat should tighten enough to hold you. Just unflip it, tighten opposite side a few turns, set height and pull the lever tight. Congrats on your first ride! Mine was 1.5 miles and I felt it! Now I am doing 25 miles rides with no problem. It takes time.
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Old 07-29-14, 08:03 PM
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Some shops have multiple levels of service. A tune-up usually checks and lubes chain, adjusts brakes and deraileurs, lubes cables, checks tires, may adjust wheel bearings probably adjust headset and check all bolts. Truing of wheels probably costs more. They will also probably give the frame a once over for cracks and obvious damage. But like I said they probably have various levels of tune ups.

And I could be wrong about what your LBS includes.

Bill
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Old 07-29-14, 09:28 PM
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I agree with [MENTION=114521]WonderMonkey[/MENTION] - every ride counts. Matter of fact, it's better to go for a short, quick ride than to sit at home on the couch wishing you had time to go for a longer one. I've never regretted heading out for a quick ride when time is short.

I don't know how mechanically inclined you are but bike maintenance is not very complex. You should probably give the bike a nice cleaning, clean and lube the chain and check the derailleur alignment (or you can have a shop check for you) Park Tools has a nice set of videos on their site, and of course, you tube has zillions as well and maybe even on your exact bike. Check it out.
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Old 07-29-14, 09:36 PM
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Adjusting gears on your bike is frighteningly easy. I myself didn't know this until my LBS mech asked me to sit in on my first bike's free first mech check over. There's heaps of youtube vids that you can watch to see how it's done. Like this one for example https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxV_vKlgolc that can help you to stop your chain coming off the front ring. Since that sit in with my LBS mech, I do almost all of the maintenance and tooling on my bike myself. Use youtube, the park tools website and a good book like the Zinn books on bike maintenance.

Although if you just hate the prospect of tooling on your own bike, ask around about a good bike mech to use. Some bike mechs unfortunately are just plain dodgy
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Old 07-30-14, 05:33 AM
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Absolutely 1 mile counts! Mark it down in the log.

Ditto to those telling you that you could read up on the suggested sites and adjust stuff yourself. I started out last year on an 8 year old Walmart bike that I bought in 2005 to ride with my daughter when she was learning at 5 yo. I didn't know anything about adjusting things and was able to get everything adjusted so the chain didn't come off and it shifted fairly well. Mine was very worn out, so I couldn't get it perfect, but it was usable and I could get every gear though with some effort because everything was worn out.

I had taken the derailleurs and the brakes completely apart to clean them up, reassembled them, adjusted them, and got it all working well enough to ride.
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Old 07-30-14, 07:18 AM
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A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.
Lao-tzu, The Way of Lao-tzu, Chinese philosopher (604 BC - 531 BC)
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Old 07-30-14, 07:23 AM
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1 miles counts! The deraileurs have stops that keep a chain from coming off. Too loose the chain comes off, too much the other way, and it wont reach the last gear.
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Old 07-30-14, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse
I agree with @WonderMonkey - every ride counts. Matter of fact, it's better to go for a short, quick ride than to sit at home on the couch wishing you had time to go for a longer one. I've never regretted heading out for a quick ride when time is short.
I used to get hung up on this. I'd want to do a ride and before you know it I'd get busy and the time for the longer ride would be gone. Instead of just doing the shorter ride I'd move the ride to the next day and before you know it a week had passed. Now what I do is modify my ride to the shorter time. For instance if I only have a half hour I'll do intervals and if I do those right I get a fair benefit from it.
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Old 07-30-14, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Matty86
Just a quick picture I took this afternoon. I bought a cage for a water bottle but the screws aren't long enough to hold it on.
Good looking bike! Ride that thing to death and in time your wants and needs will change and you will have another bike with this one sitting next to it.
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Old 07-30-14, 07:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Matty86
I'll have to look into that tomorrow, I may bite the bullet and bring it in for a tune-up. Gonna do some reading and see what generally that entails. Even having only done a mile, I could feel it in my legs in places that I don't feel from walking or doing the workouts I used to do. Felt good!
I used to take my bike in once a year for a tuneup but then here and there I'd tackle something on my own. I now do most of it myself but here and there I'll still take it into the shop. In time my visits to the shop will be more infrequent.
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Old 07-30-14, 04:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Matty86
Took my "new" bike out today for the first time. Only did a mile...
My first ride in May was 1.89 miles. Yep I count it all. I have monthly goals. So every mile counts towards my monthly goal.
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Old 07-30-14, 05:13 PM
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Congrats. Your first mile of many is done.
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Old 07-30-14, 06:21 PM
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I've lost track on where I am in line, but I'll "third" or "fourth" the comment about 1 mile absolutely does count. Congratulations. It's the first step to many new adventures.

I had some little medical issues that sidelined be for a while. My first ride as soon as I could was 1 mile. It was a HUGE deal for me! That was July of 2011. Fast forward to today. I've now done a few centuries, and will be riding another in a few weeks with several from this forum. It takes time to build up to it, but you can do it.

YouTube is your friend. If you're not comfortable, get the bike into the LBS for a quick adjustment - then get out there and ride!

Please keep us updated on your progress. We like to help celebrate successes, of which you will have many!
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Old 07-30-14, 07:38 PM
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Originally Posted by WonderMonkey
I used to get hung up on this. I'd want to do a ride and before you know it I'd get busy and the time for the longer ride would be gone. Instead of just doing the shorter ride I'd move the ride to the next day and before you know it a week had passed. Now what I do is modify my ride to the shorter time. For instance if I only have a half hour I'll do intervals and if I do those right I get a fair benefit from it.
Yup. I didn't do intervals per say, but last year first starting out I rode flat trails exclusively. If I didn't have time for my normal trail, I stopped on the way home from work at the shorter trail. I didn't do intervals, but since it only took me 20 minutes to ride out and back, I just rode at a much higher effort for the whole 20 minutes.

And more about the 1 mile ride. Now it is 1 mile. In 2 weeks you'll be posting about riding 10 miles. 2 months and you'll be posting that you rode 20 miles. It comes surprisingly quick.
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Old 07-30-14, 07:55 PM
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My first ride (sorta) was only four years ago..... and was LESS than a mile. I rode down to the coffee shop I used to walk to before my feet developed a problem. When I dismounted that first time I almost hit the ground my legs were so weak. I used the bicycle to hold myself up till I studied myself.

That first ride counts.

Long story short.... I lost weight, got healthy, then got fit. Normal near daily ride is now 20, 25, or 40 miles. Although in really bad winter weather I have taken shorter rides, mostly just to spend time on the bicycle. And I enjoy every mile of every ride.
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Old 07-30-14, 08:20 PM
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I started with one mile at age 54, 225 lb, 2 months ago. Last weekend I did 14 miles - usual is 10 - and my plan is to stretch to 22 miles (Carmel to Broadripple and back) all on the beautiful Monon Trail.

Get an app to track time and rides and enjoy. I started 1-2 miles first few days, then 3-4, then 5-7... Once I cracked 10 I found it much easier.
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Old 07-30-14, 09:19 PM
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At first your progress is slow and is a fight. Once you get to where you can ride a few miles then ride one way far enough that to make it back you have gone just a bit further than you did before. Not much but just a little. In time you can extend that further and further if you find that is what you want and enjoy.
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Old 07-30-14, 11:02 PM
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Some suggestions I found worked for me.

1. Plan your routes to locations you enjoy visiting like a park, coffee shop, trail...

2. Increase in steps, maybe a mile or so then more. Listen to your body.

3. Ride with a buddy, in my case my wife or teenage daughter.

4. Drive the route and identify trouble spots so you are not caught off guard.

Slow and steady growth does it !
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Old 07-31-14, 04:22 AM
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My first ride was a mental visualization. Then the next day I rode around the block.
Good luck to you and congrats on finding this wonderful life style.

Charlie
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Old 07-31-14, 06:26 AM
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It counts. Every minute on a bike counts.

+1 on the bike shop tune up, bring a list of any questions you have. While you are there, get a basic fitting. Most shops will help you set saddle and handlebar position for free or a nominal fee as long as you are purchasing some goods and/or services. You can get a more comprehensive fitting for more $$$ but just good advice on where to set your seat and handlebars will get you started. Riding with a horribly mis-adjusted bike can cause knee, back, wrist, and other pain.

If the seat post binder isn't holding well, it may be a mismatch between the seat tube and the seat post size or the cam design. I've encountered a couple of bikes where the cam passes its tightest point and then loosens just a touch as it locks down. If it is a problem, just replace the cam binder with a bolt. There are specific seat post binder bolts that take two allen wrenches to tighten, or you can use the appropriate diameter and length of bolt, washers and lock nut. I get allen headed stainless steel bolts from Fastenal (a parts supplier). I have done this with two of my bikes, not because the post was slipping but to decrease the chances of someone walking off with my good saddle and seat post. I started riding at over 300 pounds and never had a seat post that slipped once properly sized and clamped.

Congratulations and Welcome.

Last edited by GravelMN; 07-31-14 at 06:34 AM.
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