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strongest rail material?

Old 08-04-14, 07:40 PM
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strongest rail material?

I'm looking for a new ladies fit slightly wide seat. I can't work out which materials are best for strength/won't bend. Even when the descriptions of seats say steel or titanium etc, how do I k ow its hollow or solid? I know ive asked a similar question i juat more concerned with how to discern what i need & Any tips on seat brands that use solid rails?
Thanks in advance.
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Old 08-04-14, 11:55 PM
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Saddle rail strength, as you mentioned, is a matter of both material and design. In general, I think the chrome-moly (aka cro-mo) rails are probably the strongest, but are often hollow. Cheaper saddles may use solid high tensile (aka hi-ten) steel which even though there is more material, is probably more likely to bend than many of the hollow cro-mo rails. I weigh about 230 and have weighed a good bit more and have never had bending problems with cro-mo rails, even though I ride on some rough roads.

Another factor is the design and placement of the rail clamp along the rails. Seats that are clamped very far forward or back on the rails are more likely to bend than those clamped near the center of the rails. Don't change your seat placement just to get the clamp near the center of the rails, but if your current setup has you clamping at the far ends of the rails, consider getting a seat post with more or less setback as needed. Good rail clamps are wide and distribute the clamping force along a fair section of the rails.

It is also important to learn to ride light in the saddle. Your bike should be set up so that it is easy to lift your bum partially or completely off the saddle when on rough road or riding over bumps or obstacles. You'll find this is easier on your back as well.
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Old 08-05-14, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by GravelMN
Saddle rail strength, as you mentioned, is a matter of both material and design. In general, I think the chrome-moly (aka cro-mo) rails are probably the strongest, but are often hollow. Cheaper saddles may use solid high tensile (aka hi-ten) steel which even though there is more material, is probably more likely to bend than many of the hollow cro-mo rails. I weigh about 230 and have weighed a good bit more and have never had bending problems with cro-mo rails, even though I ride on some rough roads.

Another factor is the design and placement of the rail clamp along the rails. Seats that are clamped very far forward or back on the rails are more likely to bend than those clamped near the center of the rails. Don't change your seat placement just to get the clamp near the center of the rails, but if your current setup has you clamping at the far ends of the rails, consider getting a seat post with more or less setback as needed. Good rail clamps are wide and distribute the clamping force along a fair section of the rails.

It is also important to learn to ride light in the saddle. Your bike should be set up so that it is easy to lift your bum partially or completely off the saddle when on rough road or riding over bumps or obstacles. You'll find this is easier on your back as well.
Hey,
Thanks for the reply. so maybe my placement on the rail is an issue? Its basically as far back as it'll go and tilted upward very slightly. I will admit it is a pretty cheap generic saddle so probably made of cream cheese! the problem I have is I have a muscle disorder so standing while pedalling is just not possible at the moment, I can stand for a few seconds downhill but that's about it, as you can imagine this is why rail strength and saddle comfort is important to me. I am considering a brooks saddle as they have pretty good suspension but as I am over 300lbs I worry I'm gonna break the springs! lol ill keep an eye out for something girl shaped with Cromo rails, doesn't seem to be very common as yet though. I'm after something this shape Bontrager 2013 Comfort Gel CRZ+ Saddle | Evans Cycles
thanks again hun x
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Old 08-05-14, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Laly
Its basically as far back as it'll go and tilted upward very slightly.
See what your LBS has in a setback seatpost. They are designed to move the clamp back a bit so you don't wind up at the end of your rails.
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