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Shortened Ride - First time ever

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Shortened Ride - First time ever

Old 08-16-14, 07:53 PM
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Shortened Ride - First time ever

I am training for a century and Saturday is my big ride day building up to the Century in late September.
Today I was to do 42 miles. I planned my route but at mile 25 my legs were aching. They still do now. Changed the route to home and ended up with 32 miles and 2850 ft of climbing. Four Cat 4 hills on the ride.
Hopefully it was just the hills and I will pick up where I left off with 48 miles and a slightly flatter route next week.
Just feeling a little defeated right now.
Allan
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Old 08-16-14, 08:18 PM
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Does your route have that much climbing in it? I ask because many centuries don't, since the goal is to attract a wide audience. Obviously, Gran Fondos and similar events are a different kind of challenge.

Personally, before my last century I never got much above 50 miles at a time. Instead, I would focus on sprint work and intervals and go out as hard as I could for short periods, take it easy for a part of the ride and then crank it up again on the way home. So I wouldn't get that deflated at your current efforts.

Also, realize that you'll be going in a group, which will allow you to share the work and reduce your effort by 20 percent or so when you're not pulling.
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Old 08-16-14, 08:37 PM
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Actually the century is practically flat. I'm just including the hills in my training to build strength and improve anaerobic also. I just stink when it comes to hills. It's an area that I feel is my weakness and the only way to improve is more hills.
Also trying to lose the wight so I don't have to carry as much up them. Gravity stinks.
allan
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Old 08-16-14, 09:00 PM
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Hills are awesome training, don't give them up. They're like nature's intervals. Your route sounds like a solid training routine!

Anyway, anybody who trains enough will have an off day or two. I cut my ride short Wednesday because I was light headed & felt weak (a gatorade and a payday bar fixed me right up) so I skipped out on 10 miles I had planned and came home after 24 miles. It didn't seem to hurt me today - I rode a 107 mile hilly century (6k feet).

I think training volume overall for the two months preceding the century are more important than what you did on a particular day. Don't let occasional setbacks slow you down, we all have them.

Good luck on your ride.
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Old 08-17-14, 08:15 AM
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Just reading a book on cyclist training now,lots of good info, but one thing stressed is that paying attention to what your body is telling you is very important :-). The same power output does not equate the same level of bodily stress on any given day.

Cyclist’s Training Bible
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Old 08-17-14, 08:30 AM
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I waved the white flag a week ago. Couldn't hang and gave up 4 miles short of our intended half way. I was riding with a group that is a stretch for me and it got the best of me. I rested for a couple of days and then had a couple of the best/hardest rides of the year. Don't let it get you down.
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Old 08-17-14, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Willbird
Just reading a book on cyclist training now,lots of good info, but one thing stressed is that paying attention to what your body is telling you is very important :-). The same power output does not equate the same level of bodily stress on any given day.

Cyclist’s Training Bible
Agreed. You are smart to listen to your body. DO NOT look at this as a failure. You rode 32 miles with 2,850 feet of climbing. That isn't anything to apologize for. Keep at it. And don't fear the hills. Nice job!!!!
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Old 08-17-14, 09:24 AM
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Thanks. It's a route I have never taken before buy right from the start is a cat 4 climb over a mile long. I5 Strava new segments to cut my teeth on and improve my time. Beautiful country roads and low car traffic. Just glad I got a Garmin just over a month ago where I felt like I was near done, I was able to reroute and find a good route home.
5'6 and 220 lbs and 9 percent grades over 0.6 mile are challenging. Just a reminder how much I need to lose some major weight.
I went out for a 20 mile group ride Monday and there was a lady probably weighed around 100 lbs. I swear she coasted up hill.
Allan
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Old 08-17-14, 10:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Willbird
Just reading a book on cyclist training now,lots of good info, but one thing stressed is that paying attention to what your body is telling you is very important :-). The same power output does not equate the same level of bodily stress on any given day.

Cyclist’s Training Bible
This is why I like the HRM. Somedays is feels like I am not working hard enough, other days it feels like I am struggling.
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Old 08-17-14, 10:52 AM
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My first attempt at a century, just about a year ago, ended when I threw in the towel at mile eighty, and took a flat shortcut to the finish. I could see the next Cat4 hill from there and had already climbed 5k ft by then.

Temecula Valley Century Ride - Temecula, CA

I succeeded in March one one where my Garmin Recorded just a couple of feet under a mile of climbing.

Bike Ride Profile | 101 miles near Solvang | Times and Records | Strava

For that one I had done a training ride three weeks before of 63 miles, and picked a route with max climbing, which turned out to be almost 6k feet. After a while hills become a fun challenge. Going faster up them an incentive to lose more weight.
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Old 08-17-14, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by linnefaulk
This is why I like the HRM. Somedays is feels like I am not working hard enough, other days it feels like I am struggling.
I agree, my Wahoo TICKR is the best $60 I have spent so far :-).
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Old 08-17-14, 01:19 PM
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that's a decent amount of climbing in 30 miles... don't feel bad. Those are the kinds of rides I like. I'm training for 102miles with ~9k of climbing myself. Got a bug that wiped me out for a couple weeks and feel like I'm starting over almost. I felt ok after 40miles/3k.. so I need to get back into 50-60 w/5K climbing.
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Old 08-17-14, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Willbird
Just reading a book on cyclist training now,lots of good info, but one thing stressed is that paying attention to what your body is telling you is very important :-).
Great advice. That was exactly what I was thinking as I read the post. I have found that from day to day, rest, nutrition, hydration, temperature, and recent riding all can have a big effect. I have some standard rides that I often do. I find that one day I feel completely fresh and it feels as if I can ride with little effort. Other days I am slogging through and feeling as if every mile, every small grade is a major effort.
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Old 08-17-14, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by etw
Great advice. That was exactly what I was thinking as I read the post. I have found that from day to day, rest, nutrition, hydration, temperature, and recent riding all can have a big effect. I have some standard rides that I often do. I find that one day I feel completely fresh and it feels as if I can ride with little effort. Other days I am slogging through and feeling as if every mile, every small grade is a major effort.
The Author talks about "Perceived Effort" and "Rate of Perceived Exertion" which is all cyclists had until HRM and more recently Power Meters were developed.

Many casual cyclists, non professionals to keep that clear might be a better term OVER train.......a 110% effort according to the Author is one that stimulates the body to respond by getting stronger....and the growth occurs during sleep or recovery days. Many of us our hard days are probably too hard and frequent, and our easy days are not easy enough :-). The bulk of training can be achieved (according to the Author) in 3 days a week, and maybe 1% more if you take it to a 7 day program.

I like to ride and I have joined a challenge group on MFP that calls for 20 minutes of some exercise every day so I do SOMETHING every day, and that something might as well be on a Bike :-). If the weather is nasty looking I'd rather walk in Walmart or head out and maybe get rained on walking instead of being 10 miles from home on the bike and have the sky open up :-).

Bill

Last edited by Willbird; 08-17-14 at 02:26 PM.
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