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New bike help...please

Old 02-11-15, 09:22 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by Lou Ville
Could you ask my wife please? :-)
Dear Mrs. Lou Ville,

You may have heard the story about the farmer and her horse. One day the farmer was looking at her horse as she fed it and thinking what a valuable asset it was to her farm. Her only concern was the cost of feed which prevented her from spending on other pressing needs. If only there was a way to cut costs. Suddenly, the farmer was struck with an idea. What if she added a cup of sawdust to the horse's feed? Surely the horse wouldn't notice and her cost for feed would be less.

The farmer noticed with satisfaction that the horse seemed to do just fine and, curious as to how far she could take this new feed, she increased the amount of sawdust. And so it went until one day the farmer went out to the barn and the horse was dead.

I've told you this story because it has come to my attention that for the past two years your husband has been fed a steady diet of exercise on a old bike with parts that have been worn and made brittle with age. If he gets a new bike that just barely meets his needs he is not likely to remain enthusiastic about riding in the future. It will be like living with a horse that's been fed sawdust. :-(

Mrs. Lou Villa, you don't want to end up with a dead horse, do you? Your husband deserves to be treated to a far finer bike.

Sincerely, Cale

Last edited by cale; 02-11-15 at 09:36 PM.
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Old 02-12-15, 01:05 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Lou Ville
Thanks for the replys. I don't beieve the Trek 7.4 or the Fuji have the double wall rims and that is the one thing, I was told to make sure I got. The 7.2 has the double wall rims, what about the other components. I just want something that holds up well and shifts smoothly as I have been dealing with shifting issues since the summer. Don't really want to get into "rebuilding" a bike, I am having a hard enough time buying one. lol
Have you ever replaced the chain in the past 20 years? Did you oil and clean the chain as part of your regular maintenance?

I don't know what your maintenance routine has been or how many miles you've ridden, but you may be able to clean up your shifting issues with a few small steps:

1. oil/clean the chain

2. adjust the limit screws properly on your derailleur

3. taking up some cable slack with the barrel adjuster

I don't think it makes much sense to buy a new bike immediately: you might be able to get your bike shifting perfectly with some minor DIY maintenance.
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Old 02-12-15, 11:33 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Lou Ville
Not comfortable with the road bikes I have tried. Like the more upright position. I am 6'1" 30 inch inseam.
You can get a fairly upright riding position from a touring bike. I bought my Salsa Casseroll almost 2 years ago and it is one of the most comfortable bikes I have ever ridden, and I used a hybrid for over 10 years. The problem with flat bars is, they put the wrist in an unnatural position. Additionally, Over longer rides, it makes sense to have more than one hand position. There are different solutions to the problem including mustache bars, Jones loop bar, trekking bars, Woodchipper bars, and drop bars.

As as to the cost issue, $800 isn't chump change but when it comes to bicycles, it doesn't go as far as it did even a few years ago. This problem is exacerbated by being a Clydesdale. Even at the $800 price point, you may need to spend a few hundred upgrading the wheels sooner rather than later. (I just had to do this on my back wheel, which failed after a couple thousand miles and my bike cost me $1,200 3 years ago.
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Old 02-12-15, 01:29 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by bassjones
I'd recommend a true road bike, possibly used. A touring model would be great as they typically have easier gears for climbing hills with a fully loaded bike. The road bike drop bars will give you more hand positions as well. A touring bike will normally have overbuilt wheels. Specific models would be Surly Long Haul Trucker, Jamis Aurora, Salsa Vaya, Trek 520. How tall are you and what is your inseam - cycling inseam particularly, if you know it.
Originally Posted by Lou Ville
Not comfortable with the road bikes I have tried. Like the more upright position. I am 6'1" 30 inch inseam.
Originally Posted by MRT2
You can get a fairly upright riding position from a touring bike. I bought my Salsa Casseroll almost 2 years ago and it is one of the most comfortable bikes I have ever ridden, and I used a hybrid for over 10 years. The problem with flat bars is, they put the wrist in an unnatural position. Additionally, Over longer rides, it makes sense to have more than one hand position. There are different solutions to the problem including mustache bars, Jones loop bar, trekking bars, Woodchipper bars, and drop bars.

As as to the cost issue, $800 isn't chump change but when it comes to bicycles, it doesn't go as far as it did even a few years ago. This problem is exacerbated by being a Clydesdale. Even at the $800 price point, you may need to spend a few hundred upgrading the wheels sooner rather than later. (I just had to do this on my back wheel, which failed after a couple thousand miles and my bike cost me $1,200 3 years ago.
I put my recommendation in for a road bike. Drop bars don't have to be uncomfortable....just don't set them up like a 20 year old racer wanna be...with a huge drop from the saddle. Set the the bars level or highter than the saddle...you can lower as weight and flexiblity allows.

Natural hand position is with the palm parallel to the frame, not perpendicular. you don't get this with flat bars. Drop bars give lots of positions and can save you in headwind.

what is not noted so far is most people find riding a road bike let's them go 1-2 mph faster with no greater effort

here are some sample bikes from performance (am not a huge fan of performance, but as they are pretty common not a bad place to start for comparisons)

Charge Plug Road Bike - 2015 Performance Exclusive

Fuji Tread 1.3 Disc Road Bike - 2015

Charge Plug 3 City Bike - 2014

Fuji Tread 1.5 Disc Road Bike - 2015
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Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can.





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Old 02-12-15, 04:54 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Lou Ville
Forgive my ignorance, but my Trek does have 3 gears in front but I have only used two, rarely get in the bottom gear.
Okay! If you don't use it now, then you won't use it on a new bike.

I was simply giving that as a 'heads up'. For bigger guys especially, hills can be challenging without sufficiently low gearing. Many entry-level hybrids have a triple crankset (meaning 3 gears up front and, specifically, a very very small bottom gear); but most mid-to-high level hybrids and most road bikes only have two gears up front. Often something like a 50/34 or a 48/32. Meaning your option for lowest gear is a bit higher than the lowest gear option on your current trek. BUT; those drivetrains are also generally a bit better. So if you can swing it, go that way!
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Old 02-12-15, 07:06 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Lou Ville
For those asking, I have a Navigator 200 approx 20 years old. Have had it to two shops and it still does not shift correctly. Sometimes it shifts for no apparent reason sometime won't shift. Does not seem to have a problem with lighter riders.
Hmm. That seems odd.
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