Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Planning my first century!

Old 03-18-15, 12:50 PM
  #1  
LGHT
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LGHT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Irvine
Posts: 1,421

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac SL3, Nishiki Pro Hybrid SL

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Planning my first century!

Looking at the century list that @IBOHUNT posted got me thinking that I start preparing for my first century. Up until the last 6 weeks I really haven’t been pushing too hard and have just been riding routes around 20-40 miles with very little elevation. After getting dropped from the club routes on the hills 6 weeks ago I decided to start pushing myself more and doing routes with elevation in mind. Since that time I put in 283 miles and just under 23,000’ of incline over 11 rides. I haven’t ridden less than 2000’ of incline once in those routes, but I also haven’t ridden further than 40 miles either.

My typical route from home is a loop that consists of 32 miles and 2300’ of incline. I try and ride that route at least twice a week and I usually do the entire route in about 2 and a half hours at a normal pace. If I push I can do the route in about 2 hours and 20 minutes. Most of my rides are typically around 2 to 3 hours and I really haven’t made an effort to ride further than 50 miles simply due to time constraints.

For those of you that ride centuries when you prepare do you just slow your pace down and focus on distance, or do you ride hard and fast and just try and build up power that will eventually allow you to ride further and longer over time? I can probably get in some longer rides, but to be honest I just get bored of riding slow after a couple of hours and typically end up focusing on time or beating my PR’s on Strava. I can also try and get in more than 2 rides a week now that I can ride after work since the time change. Let me know if riding more often and less distance would be better than my current schedule twice a week schedule.

There is a century close to home that consists of 5700’ of incline and ironically it includes the Santiago Canyon loop that I’m already riding twice a week. If I want to prepare for that century would it make since to just do the Santiago Canyon loop twice which would give me 64 miles and 4600’ of incline over and over or should I focus on riding slower longer rides of 75 miles or more and then add in some incline later for training or better yet should I do both?

The century close to home is on June 6th so that wouldn’t give me a of time to really prepare and my next ride will be my 57th ride ever. Do you think it’s too soon to attempt the century in June? If so I can look into doing the “Cool Breeze” Century that @TrojanHorse posted that is scheduled for Aug 15th . That century is about 700’ less incline and would give me 2 more months to prepare.
LGHT is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 12:58 PM
  #2  
TrojanHorse
SuperGimp
 
TrojanHorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Whittier, CA
Posts: 13,144

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1012 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
5700 feet is sturdy but not insane - which century is it? Big Ring?

The hard part about centuries is being able to sit on that damn saddle for 7 hours and maintaining your nutrition - it's highly likely you could do one now if you figured out your nutrition already. I would say the more miles you have in your legs, the better but really, the more time you have in your legs the better... so doing a double santiago loop would be pretty good century prep. There's no reason to actually ride a century to prep for a century, so if you can do 70+ miles and/or a 5-6 hour moving time ride you can do a century. IMHO.

I think most people will tell you that you'll hit a mental wall somewhere around 80 miles on a century. Your legs will feel like noodles, your brain will be in a fog and getting through it is mostly a mental exercise in determination. Stuff you normally like eating on a ride will taste like garbage or you'll have an upset stomach from too much sugar. You just have to power through.
TrojanHorse is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 01:04 PM
  #3  
dr_lha
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 4,816

Bikes: 2016 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross v5, 2015 Ritchey Road Logic, 1998 Specialized Rockhopper, 2017 Raleigh Grand Prix

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I did my first century last year, and the prep for it was a weekly ride from 45-65 miles for about 7 weeks before the ride, plus the addition of regular 20-30 mile rides I was doing. Never actually did a century until I "did the century".

With a group, some training rides under your belt, and plenty of chamois butter application and food breaks, a century is easily doable, but you do need to get some miles under your belt before hand if you don't want to kill yourself on the day. With the training, I found the Century enjoyable and relaxing, rather than feeling I was going to die.
dr_lha is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 01:08 PM
  #4  
dr_lha
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 4,816

Bikes: 2016 Black Mountain Cycles Monster Cross v5, 2015 Ritchey Road Logic, 1998 Specialized Rockhopper, 2017 Raleigh Grand Prix

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 355 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
BTW for my Century I did it in just over 6 hours and averaged about 16.5 mph, about 2 mph below my usual pace going for 20-30 mile rides. That speed was really governed by the group I was in, rather than my own riding style. I would suggest that going slow and steady is the way to go with these rides.
dr_lha is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 01:24 PM
  #5  
jimincalif
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Lake Forest, CA
Posts: 2,033

Bikes: '96 Trek 850, '08 Specialized Roubaix Comp, '18 Niner RLT RDO

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 491 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 13 Posts
I know you have child care duties, but can you arrange to do the OCW spring metric century on 3/28? It includes Santiago Canyon and its about 3200 feet. Last year this was my first metric. By summer I was doing a 45-60 mile ride most weekends with 100 miles per week overall. Then in September I did the OCW Amtrak for my first century, and didn't have any problem with it.

Sometimes I'll ride 50 or 60 miles and based on how I feel wonder how I would ever do 100? But much of it is mental (in addition to the saddle/arse interface TH mentioned), and knowing you're going for 100 means pacing yourself. For the Amtrak I knew there was a big climb around mile 80 so my mind was focused on it and the rest of the ride after that was easy. On the Palm Springs ride last month I knew most of the climbing was at the beginning and after that it was flat. I felt myself lagging mentally between 65 and 85 miles. After that the end was in sight, I latched on to a fast group and kicked up the speed to the end.
jimincalif is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 01:35 PM
  #6  
IBOHUNT
Senior Member
 
IBOHUNT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Western Maryland - Appalachian Mountains
Posts: 4,011

Bikes: Motobecane Fantom Cross; Cannondale Supersix replaced the Giant TCR which came to an untimely death by truck

Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Since you are already riding part of the Century Canyon loop I'd think you can get through that one.

Originally Posted by LGHT View Post
If I want to prepare for that century would it make since to just do the Santiago Canyon loop twice which would give me 64 miles and 4600’ of incline over and over or should I focus on riding slower longer rides of 75 miles or more and then add in some incline later for training or better yet should I do both?
.
That's what I would do (and did). When I was getting ready for Mountains of Misery I had a 25 mile loop that I would ride that is ~25 miles with ~2500'. Two laps twice a month then throw in the ride there and home for 36 additional miles and 2600' gain and that's a good day.

During the week I rode around the house where I can either go do flat 50'/mile or if I just do laps in the neighborhood I can get 150'/mi. A well rounded plan is a good thing.

As for endurance... I believe once you get to where you can ride 75 miles you should be able to do the last 25 just due to the 'rush' of doing it.
IBOHUNT is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 02:07 PM
  #7  
JReade
Senior Member
 
JReade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 1,621
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
https://www.strava.com/activities/31695353 Here's my first century. It wasn't graceful by any means. I did a few metric centuries before, but working with a group helps when you're pushing the boundaries.
JReade is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 02:32 PM
  #8  
kc0bbq
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,114

Bikes: 2006 Raleigh Cadent 2.0, 2016 Trek Emonda ALR 6, 2015 Propel Advanced SL 2, 2000 K2 Zed SE

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I dig that ride profile. _______________________________________________________________

The absolute flattest route I could find for my first century last year was ~2600 feet of climbing. But 0 feet? That's like magic!
kc0bbq is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 02:50 PM
  #9  
IBOHUNT
Senior Member
 
IBOHUNT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Western Maryland - Appalachian Mountains
Posts: 4,011

Bikes: Motobecane Fantom Cross; Cannondale Supersix replaced the Giant TCR which came to an untimely death by truck

Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JReade View Post
https://www.strava.com/activities/31695353 Here's my first century. It wasn't graceful by any means. I did a few metric centuries before, but working with a group helps when you're pushing the boundaries.
0 feet gain....

Hammerfest 52x16
IBOHUNT is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 03:16 PM
  #10  
LGHT
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LGHT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Irvine
Posts: 1,421

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac SL3, Nishiki Pro Hybrid SL

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks all for the tips. I think I need to harden up my arse a bit, because I didn't even think about spending that much time in the saddle and how I would feel after 3 hours. Even at a good pace 6 hours is a LOT of time in the saddle. I also need to pick up some chamois butter and try and figure out where it’s supposed to go exactly. I think I have my nutrition research down enough to make it through. I’m making my own drinks with Maltodextrin, Protein, and a few other items which seems to really help during the weekly routes. I usually fill 1 bottle with the “mix” and another bottle with water/coconut water.

@TrojanHorse yes I was looking at Big Ring since it was close to home and I’m familiar with the route. However 5700’ is a bit much so I’m going to just play it by ear and try and get in more riding time each week and see how I feel 2 weeks before the ride.

@jimincalif I might be able to do spring metric if the wife is working 1-9pm that day. If she’s working later I could probably do the route if I’m there early and leave right at 8:00am.. Plus my 12-30 cassette just came in and chain so that would be a great route to break them in. Are you riding it? That would be a great preparing route to start the training off with for sure.

@IBOHUNT during your training you would do 2 loops of 25 miles with 2500’ AND do another 36 miles of 2600’ in one ride or was the 36 miles and 2600’ just a training ride in addition to the 2 loops done during the same week at a later time?


Do you guys stop and take a break during the ride and if so how long? I’ve gotten strong enough on my weekly Santiago loop I don’t stop and rest at all. At first I would stop 4 times, then 3, but now I just ride the route from beginning to end none stop. However if I try and do a double loop I’ll be sure to stop and refuel after the first loop before starting the next one. If I do attempt the century should I plan to stop every 30 miles or just play it by feel and stop as needed? Also how much time should I take off before the ride to ensure I’m fresh, but not stale from not riding?
LGHT is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 03:17 PM
  #11  
LGHT
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LGHT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Irvine
Posts: 1,421

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac SL3, Nishiki Pro Hybrid SL

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by IBOHUNT View Post
0 feet gain....

Hammerfest 52x16
hahaahah that's what I was thinking... Wow that would a great training route for sure!
LGHT is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 04:11 PM
  #12  
Willbird
Senior Member
 
Willbird's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Very N and Very W Ohio Williams Co.
Posts: 2,458

Bikes: 2001 Trek Multitrack 7200, 2104 Fuji Sportif 1.5

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have only done one century, way back in 1991, my biggest ride prior to it was 53 miles, I made it :-). It was a very flat one....but the darn WIND was the unknown, if compact cranks existed back then I sure did not have one, and my bike was a 7 speed Bianchi....I was all the way down in lowest gear and grinding into the wind barely keeping cadence up, so IMHO make sure you have enough gearing to handle any unplanned headwinds.

Last summer I did a metric solo, and a 75mi ride with a group, both on a Trek 7200 hybrid.

If you get off the bike for long IMHO you will stiffen up, I'd get off, take a leak, load up on some free food if they have it, and back on the road :-).

If you do not have a power meter or HRM a HRM is a decent "tachometer" for effort, will help you pace, and is not super expensive.

The 75 I did last summer I did not wear my HRM...and I did 50mi of it with a group of three others that were going just a bit faster than I would have paced myself solo, the last 10 miles were a struggle but I survived :-). My biggest ride pre 75mi was honestly 32 miles, not ideal, but the route was local and if I HAD to there were a lot of parts of it where I could have just headed for home.

Looking forward to some longer rides this summer, 100mi and more.....I have a road bike now, and have lost another 20-30 lbs.
Willbird is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 04:21 PM
  #13  
JReade
Senior Member
 
JReade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 1,621
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by IBOHUNT View Post
0 feet gain....

Hammerfest 52x16
Theres nothing to be had in south FL, thats for sure.
JReade is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 05:07 PM
  #14  
jimincalif
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Lake Forest, CA
Posts: 2,033

Bikes: '96 Trek 850, '08 Specialized Roubaix Comp, '18 Niner RLT RDO

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 491 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 13 Posts
Yes, I'm doing the OCW spring metric. Regarding breaks, OCW has 2 on the metric. On the Amtrak ride I think they had 4. On the Palm Springs ride I think there might have been 5. Of course you don't have to stop at every break. On the Amtrak ride I was riding with someone and we chose to stop at each break, grab a banana or cookie or whatever, top up water and get back on the road ASAP. We did take more time at the lunch stop.

On the PS ride, there were a couple of other riders I was with, but I was faster so I rode my own pace and we regrouped at the breaks, so I spent quite a bit more time stopped. I definitely prefer getting in and out quick with maybe one longer break.
jimincalif is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 05:23 PM
  #15  
MikeRides
Senior Member
 
MikeRides's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: New York
Posts: 1,270

Bikes: Trek 1.1 (road), Raleigh Detour 4.5 (trail)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I'm planning my first solo century this summer(shooting for July 4th). My longest ride to date is 62 miles, which I managed to do within 4 hours. I've worked up to being able to do 10-12 mile rides back to back, and 25-50 mile rides on the weekends. I'm hopeful that I'll be in decent shape to ride 20 mile back to back during the week and a 50-65 mile ride on the weekends. I'm fairly confident that I'll make the distance without a problem, but I'd like to finish within 6 hours if at all possible.
MikeRides is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 05:50 PM
  #16  
LGHT
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LGHT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Irvine
Posts: 1,421

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac SL3, Nishiki Pro Hybrid SL

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jimincalif View Post
Yes, I'm doing the OCW spring metric. Regarding breaks, OCW has 2 on the metric. On the Amtrak ride I think they had 4. On the Palm Springs ride I think there might have been 5. Of course you don't have to stop at every break. On the Amtrak ride I was riding with someone and we chose to stop at each break, grab a banana or cookie or whatever, top up water and get back on the road ASAP. We did take more time at the lunch stop.

On the PS ride, there were a couple of other riders I was with, but I was faster so I rode my own pace and we regrouped at the breaks, so I spent quite a bit more time stopped. I definitely prefer getting in and out quick with maybe one longer break.
Ok that's about what I figured. I do know if I stop more than 10 minutes I tend to get lazy and it actually makes the ride harder. However I think I will plan 15-20 for lunch around mile 65 or so.


Originally Posted by MikeRides View Post
I'm planning my first solo century this summer(shooting for July 4th). My longest ride to date is 62 miles, which I managed to do within 4 hours. I've worked up to being able to do 10-12 mile rides back to back, and 25-50 mile rides on the weekends. I'm hopeful that I'll be in decent shape to ride 20 mile back to back during the week and a 50-65 mile ride on the weekends. I'm fairly confident that I'll make the distance without a problem, but I'd like to finish within 6 hours if at all possible.
How much incline is the Century? For me it's not the distance that seems to be hard it's the incline. As a clyde clearly the heavier you are the harder it is to get up and over those hills as that's when the weight really affects you more. So doing my first century with more than 5,000' of incline may be a bit more effort than I can handle if I'm not really prepared for the climbs.
LGHT is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 06:38 PM
  #17  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,229

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 212 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Sounds to me like you should be fine. I have now done 7 centuries with Cool Breeze being the hilliest. I'm no speed demon but they aren't races. My fastest average speed was 14mph. That is not anything to write the papers about but I feel good about it. I'm working on improving that.
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 08:37 PM
  #18  
IBOHUNT
Senior Member
 
IBOHUNT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Western Maryland - Appalachian Mountains
Posts: 4,011

Bikes: Motobecane Fantom Cross; Cannondale Supersix replaced the Giant TCR which came to an untimely death by truck

Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Got sent this tonight...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvZz...em-subs_digest
IBOHUNT is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 10:31 PM
  #19  
TJClay
Senior Member
 
TJClay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Costa Mesa, Ca.
Posts: 473

Bikes: Domane Project One, 6 series, Ui2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The OCW spring metric is great route, I'll be there for sure.
TJClay is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 11:02 PM
  #20  
TrojanHorse
SuperGimp
 
TrojanHorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Whittier, CA
Posts: 13,144

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1012 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by jimincalif View Post
Yes, I'm doing the OCW spring metric.
Is that really limited to 150 riders? Yeesh. And all on commonly ridden roads too, why register.
TrojanHorse is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 11:20 PM
  #21  
jimincalif
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Lake Forest, CA
Posts: 2,033

Bikes: '96 Trek 850, '08 Specialized Roubaix Comp, '18 Niner RLT RDO

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 491 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 30 Times in 13 Posts
I'm not on the board of OCW, but I'd guess the limit has to do with getting a permit for the event at the park where it starts. They usually have a good reason for their limits. Like the Amtrak is limited to 1200 because there is a limit on the number of train cars Amtrak will put together for a special train, which is limited by the length of track sidings.

Registered riders can use the rest stops and they have sag support.
jimincalif is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 11:26 PM
  #22  
jsigone
got the climbing bug
 
jsigone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: San Diego
Posts: 9,785

Bikes: one for everything

Mentioned: 71 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 503 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 12 Posts
Don't start slow don't start fast. Just ride like you normally do but do drink one tall bottle per hr minimum plus 200-300 cals per hour. Why eat when not hungry? Well you are fueling the back end of the ride. How you feel that last 1-3 he's effects bike speed but all tied into how you are fueled up. If you're hungry....well its too late. Your body can only digest 3-400 cals/hr. Burning 6-1100 cals per hour...well if you do the math. You can't fuel fast enough compared to what the body burns. You will tap into those cal stores. How you deal with everything after you deplete those stores is up to you. Some can push on. Some bonk. Ride often to figure yourself out. Yet don't over think it. Keep it to two steps

1) keep the bike going so you don't need a rescue call to the S.O. slashed tire beyond boot or broken chain w/o tool would lead me to a call.

2) keep the motor (you) fueled to keep going. Stay hydrated, don't cramp, don't rest too long ( I rest only at stop lights), recover on the bike.

Before long you will be doing them at least once a month. "It doesn't get easier, just faster"
jsigone is offline  
Old 03-18-15, 11:56 PM
  #23  
TrojanHorse
SuperGimp
 
TrojanHorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Whittier, CA
Posts: 13,144

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 134 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1012 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by jimincalif View Post
I'm not on the board of OCW, but I'd guess the limit has to do with getting a permit for the event at the park where it starts. They usually have a good reason for their limits. Like the Amtrak is limited to 1200 because there is a limit on the number of train cars Amtrak will put together for a special train, which is limited by the length of track sidings.

Registered riders can use the rest stops and they have sag support.
Yeah, I know. I'm not suggesting that I'd pirate the ride but I do ride my bike on those roads fairly frequently and I personally don't need SAG support for a metric. Whittier to San Clemente via Santiago Canyon is one of my favorite things to do on a soccer weekend down there. One stop at the gas station at Jamboree / Santiago Canyon and I'm good.

Yorba park is huge though... 150 is a tiny number.
TrojanHorse is offline  
Old 03-19-15, 07:33 AM
  #24  
PhotoJoe 
Just Plain Slow
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Santa Clarita, CA
Posts: 6,039

Bikes: Lynskey R230

Mentioned: 39 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 297 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by jimincalif View Post
ILike the Amtrak is limited to 1200 because there is a limit on the number of train cars Amtrak will put together for a special train, which is limited by the length of track sidings.
I had heard they truck the bikes back.
PhotoJoe is offline  
Old 03-19-15, 09:33 AM
  #25  
LGHT
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
LGHT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Irvine
Posts: 1,421

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac SL3, Nishiki Pro Hybrid SL

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Beachgrad05 View Post
Sounds to me like you should be fine. I have now done 7 centuries with Cool Breeze being the hilliest. I'm no speed demon but they aren't races. My fastest average speed was 14mph. That is not anything to write the papers about but I feel good about it. I'm working on improving that.
Wow great work. I don't think my average would be much faster than 14mph either, but I would like to try something that has a little less than 5,000' as my first one so I don't have months and months of training to get strong enough to do it. I figure if I can add 1000' to the route I do twice a week that would give me roughly 7000' a week or a total 28k a month. If I can add in a commute and some hills I may be able to scratch out 30k' a month. However last nights 3 hour non stop ride did have me a little saddle sore toward the end of the ride and getting out of the saddle didn't seem to help much like it normally does so I'm realizing I have a lot more training to do.
LGHT is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.