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First commute, need a rear rack and pannier

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First commute, need a rear rack and pannier

Old 05-14-15, 07:34 PM
  #1  
nuclear_biker
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First commute, need a rear rack and pannier

I'm an out of shape grad student who is going to start biking to the lab to save money, avoid the summer bus schedule, and to get exercise.

I did my first (short) commute today, and I quickly realized why people don't like to wear backpacks while commuting! They are very uncomfortable in the 'biking' position (they're designed to be worn when standing after all) and cause balance issues, especially when turning and climbing hills.

I'm looking for recommendations on rear racks and panniers (or some other method of carrying stuff). There look to be a variety of options in cost (and quality?). I'm not trying to drop a huge amount of coin, but I also don't want to drop some of my items (laptop especially). Here is a semi-complete list of things I will probably carry: Lunch, change of cloths (usually only shirt, undershirt, boxers, in the winter probably pants too), boo boo kit and toiletries, books/notebooks/binders, laptop(s), various small electronics (tablet/ipod like devices) and probably a few other random small EDC items. I have an old Trek 720 (1992/3) which seems to have the proper mounting points. I'm also open to other methods of carrying.

One final question: Does anybody do grocery shopping with their bike? I don't mean a months worth of shopping but just for a few bags worth. I've seen some rigs with front and rear baskets but I'm trying to avoid that.
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Old 05-14-15, 08:17 PM
  #2  
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I got the cheap set from Nashbar, 2800 miles just starting to show wear. With a 21 mile commute means they were off and on bike about 140 times. No complaints in rain use trash bags on inside for true water repelancy. Nicer ones out there but for price are very very good.

I also stop for groceries with these at times.

Last edited by Outnumbered; 05-14-15 at 08:18 PM. Reason: Added stuff
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Old 05-14-15, 08:19 PM
  #3  
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Banjo Brothers Waterproof Panniers are great, and pretty inexpensive ($50 each). I can easily fit over $100 of groceries in two of them.
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Old 05-14-15, 09:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Outnumbered View Post
I got the cheap set from Nashbar, 2800 miles just starting to show wear. With a 21 mile commute means they were off and on bike about 140 times. No complaints in rain use trash bags on inside for true water repelancy. Nicer ones out there but for price are very very good.

I also stop for groceries with these at times.
Nashbar has a few cheap ones. A couple for 59 and also this set for 39: Nashbar Daytrekker Panniers
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Old 05-15-15, 12:01 AM
  #5  
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Ortlieb City Rollers. About $130 for the pair. They are waterproof and just about bullet proof.
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Old 05-15-15, 04:48 AM
  #6  
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The ones I purchased from Nashbar were the LDT rack and the ATP2 panniers. They no longer carry the ATP2 pannier but the similar model is the Rear Touring Panniers. i got the bigger one as it holds a laptop and tablet without any problem with my clothes for work. To hold the rack on at the bottom I used a P-Clamp with the rubber grommet that you get at any hardware store to hold the base as my braised on fitting cracked after 18 months. Personally I think the P-Clamp is a better idea to begin with.
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Old 05-15-15, 05:25 AM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by nuclear_biker View Post
I'm an out of shape grad student who is going to start biking to the lab to save money, avoid the summer bus schedule, and to get exercise.

I did my first (short) commute today, and I quickly realized why people don't like to wear backpacks while commuting! They are very uncomfortable in the 'biking' position (they're designed to be worn when standing after all) and cause balance issues, especially when turning and climbing hills.
Another grad student here. I ride 24miles RT 4 days a week with backpacks 95% of the times. Can be uncomfortable if you have a bad bike fit that has you in a very over arched position but shouldn't cause any of the issues you're having. I actually find that panniers throw off my balance a lot, especially when I ride with a single pannier since it disproportionately weighs down one side of the bike. It also slows me down on hills, since it puts more weight on my rear wheel. At least with a backpack the extra weight actually helps to propel me forward when I move to a standing position.
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Old 05-15-15, 07:05 AM
  #8  
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Not too much has been said about racks. Are they pretty standard in size? I noticed a few maker offer mounting systems like MTX, which I probably won't need for now. I'm worried about getting one that's too wide if I try and use panniers that lay over the rack instead of attaching to the side.

Originally Posted by yankeefan View Post
Another grad student here. I ride 24miles RT 4 days a week with backpacks 95% of the times. Can be uncomfortable if you have a bad bike fit that has you in a very over arched position but shouldn't cause any of the issues you're having. I actually find that panniers throw off my balance a lot, especially when I ride with a single pannier since it disproportionately weighs down one side of the bike. It also slows me down on hills, since it puts more weight on my rear wheel. At least with a backpack the extra weight actually helps to propel me forward when I move to a standing position.
I guess everybody is a little different. I'm not too arched over, the backpack just seemed to fit awkwardly. The worst part in my opinion is even if its pretty tight to your back it will slide around when you turn, which, when you're sweating, causes chaffing and also changes balance.
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Old 05-15-15, 07:11 AM
  #9  
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I highly recommend the Planet Bike KOKO rear rack. It only costs about $35-50, available in black or silver, and works as well as racks that cost 3X as much. Very adjustable, which is a key feature during installation.

You might be able to get by with a rack-top bag rather than panniers. The trick is to leave heavier, bulkier items at work -- such as shoes, bath towel, bath supplies. I commute year-round, 30+ miles round trip, and I can can fit all the gear I need to carry in a rack-top bag. Some good inexpensive options are made by Banjo Brothers, Louis Garneau and others.
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Old 05-15-15, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by PennyTheDog View Post
Banjo Brothers Waterproof Panniers are great, and pretty inexpensive ($50 each). I can easily fit over $100 of groceries in two of them.
Good lord I could fit my entire backpack in there!

Originally Posted by tarwheel View Post
I highly recommend the Planet Bike KOKO rear rack. It only costs about $35-50, available in black or silver, and works as well as racks that cost 3X as much. Very adjustable, which is a key feature during installation.

You might be able to get by with a rack-top bag rather than panniers. The trick is to leave heavier, bulkier items at work -- such as shoes, bath towel, bath supplies. I commute year-round, 30+ miles round trip, and I can can fit all the gear I need to carry in a rack-top bag. Some good inexpensive options are made by Banjo Brothers, Louis Garneau and others.
Thanks! I will look into that rack, and also call my LBS when they open to see what they have in the way of racks and panniers. I'm not sure my laptops (I have two, but of course I would only carry one at a time) will fit in a top bag. It looks great for picnics and such though, so I might pick one up.

Last edited by nuclear_biker; 05-15-15 at 07:38 AM. Reason: Added reply to tarwheel
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Old 05-15-15, 07:43 AM
  #11  
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My experience with a total of about five different racks suggests that any rack (at least racks by reputable bike companies) work perfectly for normal daily loads. Right now I use two axiom racks and a Blackburn rack, with no problems. Blackburn, Planet Bike, Wald, Topeak, ... should all be fine as long as you're not carrying food and water on long unsupported trips. You could also look for used ones on eBay. Make sure there are at least two bars down to the seat stays, to keep the panniers from touching the wheels.

You're right that those Banjo Brothers panniers can hold a lot, but they're soft-sided with a roll top, so they can also get pretty small when they're empty and you don't want them to catch the wind.

Originally Posted by nuclear_biker View Post
Not too much has been said about racks. Are they pretty standard in size? I noticed a few maker offer mounting systems like MTX, which I probably won't need for now. I'm worried about getting one that's too wide if I try and use panniers that lay over the rack instead of attaching to the side.



I guess everybody is a little different. I'm not too arched over, the backpack just seemed to fit awkwardly. The worst part in my opinion is even if its pretty tight to your back it will slide around when you turn, which, when you're sweating, causes chaffing and also changes balance.
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Old 05-15-15, 07:51 AM
  #12  
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My first rack was a wal mart Schwinn special that was on the bike when I got it. I have zero complaints about it. It is currently awaiting another bike to be put on. I ordered a set of Axiom panniers off of Amazon and it was like $65 for the set and have not had any issues with water getting inside of them. They are big, and secure with a drawstring (makes them expandable) and a flap that snaps over it. I have never done any grocery shopping with any of my bikes, save for halloween candy. I hate grocery shopping and am not trusted to do a full trip lol.
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Old 05-15-15, 08:00 AM
  #13  
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Amazon.com : Axiom Journey Tubular Alloy Rack (Black) : Bike Racks : Sports & Outdoors
Axiom Journey Rack - Black - Modern Bike
Axiom Journey Tubular rack. The above 2 links are the same product, just different sellers. Advertised as able to hold 150# of gear. Its not heavy and has A TON of mounting positions to keep panniers both secure and out of the way of your feet.
About $35.


Axiom Seymour DLX 45 Liter Pannier Set: Gray/Black - Modern Bike
Amazon.com : Axiom Seymour DLX 45 Pannier Set, Grey/Black : Bike Panniers And Rack Trunks : Sports & Outdoors
Axiom Seymour DLX 45 panniers. About $75 total for both. 45 liter total capacity will more than hold your commuting gear and you can use them for grocery getting too. They aren't fully waterproof, but they are very water resistant(ive had them splashed from puddles many times over during rides and they don't leak. Like others said- plastic bag is good for rainy days for all panniers but the expensive rolltop waterproof models.
The panniers secure quickly and easily and stay in place. They can drawstring closed if you have a very large amount of stuff, or they can close with the top folding over and buckle shut. This allows for them to vary in size according to what you need. Each pannier has a small Velcro close outside pocket too.


Below is a list of pannier options that are not from the expensive major touring brands. They mostly have good reviews though and are a mix of waterproof and not waterproof. Liter and cu-in sizing is included since its brutal to compare pannier sizing across websites and brands due to companies advertising them in odd/meaningless ways.

[TABLE="width: 369"]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][TABLE="width: 832"]
[TR]
[TD]Mec World Tour 2[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]56 liters[/TD]
[TD]3417 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]BV Quick Release Large Pannier[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]35 liters[/TD]
[TD]2123 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Voyager Cargo Plus Panniers[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]45 liters[/TD]
[TD]2746 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Voyager Cargo Panniers[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]30 liters[/TD]
[TD]1830 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Transit Epic DX[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]46 liters[/TD]
[TD]2860 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Nashbar rear waterproof panniers[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]62 liters[/TD]
[TD]3783 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Inertia Designs Cam Touring[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]54 liters[/TD]
[TD]3316 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Ibera Quick Release[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]44 liters[/TD]
[TD]2685 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Axiom Seymour DLX 45[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]45 liters[/TD]
[TD]2746 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Axiom Seymour DLX 30[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]30 liters[/TD]
[TD]1830 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Axiom Mackenzie [/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]36 liters[/TD]
[TD]2200 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Avenir Excursion Large[/TD]
[TD="align: right"] [/TD]
[TD]27 liters[/TD]
[TD]1700 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]
Hope you find what works![/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[TABLE="width: 369"]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
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Old 05-15-15, 10:50 AM
  #14  
nuclear_biker
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Amazon.com : Axiom Journey Tubular Alloy Rack (Black) : Bike Racks : Sports & Outdoors
Axiom Journey Rack - Black - Modern Bike
Axiom Journey Tubular rack. The above 2 links are the same product, just different sellers. Advertised as able to hold 150# of gear. Its not heavy and has A TON of mounting positions to keep panniers both secure and out of the way of your feet.
About $35.


Axiom Seymour DLX 45 Liter Pannier Set: Gray/Black - Modern Bike
Amazon.com : Axiom Seymour DLX 45 Pannier Set, Grey/Black : Bike Panniers And Rack Trunks : Sports & Outdoors
Axiom Seymour DLX 45 panniers. About $75 total for both. 45 liter total capacity will more than hold your commuting gear and you can use them for grocery getting too. They aren't fully waterproof, but they are very water resistant(ive had them splashed from puddles many times over during rides and they don't leak. Like others said- plastic bag is good for rainy days for all panniers but the expensive rolltop waterproof models.
The panniers secure quickly and easily and stay in place. They can drawstring closed if you have a very large amount of stuff, or they can close with the top folding over and buckle shut. This allows for them to vary in size according to what you need. Each pannier has a small Velcro close outside pocket too.


Below is a list of pannier options that are not from the expensive major touring brands. They mostly have good reviews though and are a mix of waterproof and not waterproof. Liter and cu-in sizing is included since its brutal to compare pannier sizing across websites and brands due to companies advertising them in odd/meaningless ways.

[TABLE="width: 369"]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][TABLE="width: 832"]
[TR]
[TD]Mec World Tour 2[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]56 liters[/TD]
[TD]3417 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]BV Quick Release Large Pannier[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]35 liters[/TD]
[TD]2123 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Voyager Cargo Plus Panniers[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]45 liters[/TD]
[TD]2746 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Voyager Cargo Panniers[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]30 liters[/TD]
[TD]1830 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Transit Epic DX[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]46 liters[/TD]
[TD]2860 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Nashbar rear waterproof panniers[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]62 liters[/TD]
[TD]3783 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Inertia Designs Cam Touring[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]54 liters[/TD]
[TD]3316 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Ibera Quick Release[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]44 liters[/TD]
[TD]2685 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Axiom Seymour DLX 45[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]45 liters[/TD]
[TD]2746 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Axiom Seymour DLX 30[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]30 liters[/TD]
[TD]1830 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Axiom Mackenzie [/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]36 liters[/TD]
[TD]2200 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Avenir Excursion Large[/TD]
[TD="align: right"][/TD]
[TD]27 liters[/TD]
[TD]1700 cu in[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD]Hope you find what works![/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[TABLE="width: 369"]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
Thanks for that list! I'm gonna check out what my LBS has today; I called and it sounds like they have some of the racks mentioned here. They also have a few panniers, so I can look at what they have. If there is nothing I like, then I will pass and buy online.
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Old 05-15-15, 12:29 PM
  #15  
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I do prefer a rack, but fyi if you're carrying all that stuff it's definitely going to affect the handling and turn of the bike on a pannier as well.

It doesn't really matter which rack you get if your bike has rack mounts. I just get a topeak rack, they're all pretty much the same unless you want a fancier top mounting system, which it sounds like you do not. This kinda of stuff is usually noticeably cheaper on amazon than from a bike shop.

There's a pannier/backpack called the Arkel Bug that's a pannier on your bike but a backpack when walking around. It's expensive though:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYEmp4toAck

For grocery shopping I have the Banjo Brothers Market Pannier. It's the only pannier I could fit a digornio pizza box into - it's the same size and shape as a grocery bag. For groceries, they've been fantastic. Their drawback is mainly that they're poor for aerodynamics, you can feel the drag while riding with them - a direct result of their grocery bag shape.
Amazon.com : Banjo Brothers Market Pannier : Messenger Bags : Sports & Outdoors
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Old 05-15-15, 12:34 PM
  #16  
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I have basket like this (they can be found cheaper): Amazon.com : Basil Cardiff Rear Basket, Black : Bike Baskets : Sports & Outdoors

I use it for groceries and stuff. It fits a smaller backpack easily. It is awesome because you can use the bags you have.

My current bike has a front walk basket. A deeper on that fits a purse easily. They are $20-25 dollars. I love front baskets.
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Old 05-15-15, 03:28 PM
  #17  
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Thanks for the suggestions so far! I hit the LBS. They had the Planet Bike KOKO that's been mentioned a few times. It was the same price as online, plus I get 10% off for biking in! It was the only one that wasn't a lightweight expensive one, figure it should do the job. Worst case if I can put it on my girlfriends bike! Will post pictures later. They didn't have any panniers I liked sadly, so will review the options tonight and order.
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Old 05-15-15, 09:06 PM
  #18  
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I’ve been commuting for a year and I’ve tried rear panniers, trunks and handlebar bags. I carry the same things you are. Panniers are good as long as you are riding but are awkward to carry around as well as their odd shape makes loading things difficult to pack and unpack. Modern handlebar bags are too cumbersome to strap onto the handlebar quickly especially when they are packed with tools or your lunch. Tightening the straps too much may inadvertently squeeze your brakes and too loose will rub against your front tires.
Trunks are a good idea but some are too small for a lot of stuff.

I’m currently using a strong fabric duffel bag secured with bungee cords and carabiners. You can put a lot of stuff in it and carrying it around is easy with the shoulder or hand straps. But the bungee cords grab onto anything and everything when you are setting up or removing.
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Old 05-18-15, 05:56 PM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
I do prefer a rack, but fyi if you're carrying all that stuff it's definitely going to affect the handling and turn of the bike on a pannier as well.

It doesn't really matter which rack you get if your bike has rack mounts. I just get a topeak rack, they're all pretty much the same unless you want a fancier top mounting system, which it sounds like you do not. This kinda of stuff is usually noticeably cheaper on amazon than from a bike shop.

There's a pannier/backpack called the Arkel Bug that's a pannier on your bike but a backpack when walking around. It's expensive though:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zYEmp4toAck

For grocery shopping I have the Banjo Brothers Market Pannier. It's the only pannier I could fit a digornio pizza box into - it's the same size and shape as a grocery bag. For groceries, they've been fantastic. Their drawback is mainly that they're poor for aerodynamics, you can feel the drag while riding with them - a direct result of their grocery bag shape.
Amazon.com : Banjo Brothers Market Pannier : Messenger Bags : Sports & Outdoors
Originally Posted by PennyTheDog View Post
Banjo Brothers Waterproof Panniers are great, and pretty inexpensive ($50 each). I can easily fit over $100 of groceries in two of them.
Thanks everybody for your input. I ended up going with the Planet Bike KOKO mount (as I mentioned above) and the Banjo Brothers Market Pannier. The combination works great and I just had my first (albeit short) trip to Food Lion.



I didn't notice too many aerodynamic effects even when I had it open (on the way back, no picture, sorry), but I'm also not going very far. I will probably get a second one for the other side. I definitely like that you can sort of dial-a-thickness with this pannier; I can probably get away with running it half open on most commutes.

Edit: Wow, sorry for the huge picture...
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Old 05-18-15, 11:43 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by nuclear_biker View Post
I didn't notice too many aerodynamic effects even when I had it open (on the way back, no picture, sorry), but I'm also not going very far. I will probably get a second one for the other side. I definitely like that you can sort of dial-a-thickness with this pannier; I can probably get away with running it half open on most commutes.
Glad to hear it worked well for you. For Grocery shopping, it was definitely the best pannier I could find. :-)
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Old 05-19-15, 09:27 AM
  #21  
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My wife got some inexpensive Nashbar panniers. She doesn't use them heavily, but they seem fine.

I treated myself to Ortlieb panniers, and I'm very impressed. I feel I got my money's worth.
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Old 05-19-15, 09:50 AM
  #22  
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Nobody seems to have mentioned the Topeak stuff. I've used their bag and rack now for about five years, and they are still going strong. The mounting system for the bags is a game changer, just slide and click to engage.
Topeak® Cycling Accessories ? Products - Racks > Tubular Racks MTX
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Old 05-20-15, 10:35 AM
  #23  
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FWIW i got a rack and panniers and found i hated it more than the backpack/messenger bag. i ended up selling the bike and got a faster/lighter bike (20 lbs vs 30 lbs) and carried stuff on my back. the ventilation is not great, but it's better. i just try not to carry too much stuff and keep it light.
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Old 05-20-15, 10:57 AM
  #24  
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Rear racks are generally fairly standard, but I do have two more specific recommendations: First, get one of the ones that has stays that curve out to the back instead of just going straight down in a "V". They'll give larger panniers more support toward the rear, especially if they need to be mounted farther back to avoid hitting your heels. Second, get one that is steel instead of aluminum if you can - it'll be sturdier if you end up carrying heavy or unevenly-loaded loads over city potholes, which is common if you're getting around town by bike.

For panniers, my inclination is to go big and basic; you can always just shove your backpack or laptop bag or whatever into the pannier. I prefer that over a pannier that's meant to be taken off and carried around because I can use whatever bag I need for the stuff I'm carrying that day, and know that my bag will stay clean. I won't have to walk into a clean store or office or whatever carrying a pannier with crud all over the back of it because I was riding in the rain. Plus, if you just shove your backpack into your pannier and then you go grocery shopping on the way home, you can fill both panniers with groceries and put your backpack back on your back, and you have even more cargo space.

BTW, even though you'd think it would un-balance you, it's very common to see people riding around town with just one pannier, usually on the left side. You get used to riding that way, and works just fine. Ride in with one pannier when you don't need to carry that much, and ride in with two if you want to go shopping on the way home. Believe it or not, they don't even have to match!
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Old 05-20-15, 06:08 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by nuclear_biker View Post
I'm an out of shape grad student who is going to start biking to the lab to save money, avoid the summer bus schedule, and to get exercise.


I'm looking for recommendations on rear racks and panniers (or some other method of carrying stuff).
One final question: Does anybody do grocery shopping with their bike? I don't mean a months worth of shopping but just for a few bags worth.
I have been commuting on a bike for ~12 years now. Without the expense of a car, I don't scrimp on the bike, and what I have has worked well for me and held up.

For a rack, I have a tubus logo. I like it because it has a deck which is above the rails where your panniers hang - I have a trunk bag where I keep tools, a U-lock, and other necessities, and with the tubus rack, it doesn't interfere with putting the panniers on/off.

95% of the time, I ride with one pannier - an Arkel 'Bug' which holds my work clothes, lunch, laptop computer and a few other things...

The trunk bag is also from Arkel, don't remember the name. - I really like Arkel, excellent quality, excellent customer service.

I go shopping on the bike too, both grocery store and farmers market. I usually carry different panniers for that, or take a trailer.
I like to buy less stuff, more often, easier to carry, and food is fresher that way.
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