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Flat-Prevention Alternatives

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Flat-Prevention Alternatives

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Old 06-20-02, 12:01 PM
  #26  
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Before you start with the tire irons, push the edges of the tire in from the rim. The bead of the tire can then drop down to the centre of the rim opposite the place where you start with the irons. This will make it much easier to lift the bead over the rim. You may even be able to do it with your hands. The irons have a small hook across one end to get a grip on the tire bead. They probably have a slot on the side near the other end - this is to hold it down on a spoke while you get the next iron in.
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Old 06-20-02, 01:49 PM
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Patching is best done at home.
When patching, I roughen up the area with sandpaper and wipe clean. Apply a thin smearing of rubber solution. Wait for it to dry. Add another thing layer. Wait to dry.
Peel off the foil layer of a patch. Apply pressure from the middle to the edges, ensuring the feathered edges lay flat. Wait for it to stick for a while, then crack the paper backing, and peel off from the middle to the outside (to avoid raising the edges).

When replacing a tube, fit the valve in then use the small nut to fix it in place. When the tyre is on, apply a few pumps, then losen the nut. Push the whole valve into the rim, and re-seat the tyre bead so the valve pulls down on the tyre. Ensure the valve is radial, not skewed.

Watch out with inner tubes not to buy extra long valves (these are for deep section racing rims, not box section ones).

Tyre/rim fitting is quite variable, and its worth getting a tyre which fits easily. Tight fitting ones can be a pain to fit and can get damaged from too much application of tyre levers.
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Old 07-19-07, 09:20 PM
  #28  
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Buy Them

I have 4 bicycles wit no-mor flats inner tubes.

We started with my wife's mountain bike. I live in the desert and she was getting a flat every other day.
We bought the nomore flats tube, installed it (make sure you use a little bit of water and soap on both the inner of the tire and the tube just like it is a good idea to do with a regular tube), and she went riding. She didn't notice any difference. The tire pressure is always perfect, the tire lasts longer, the rims are protected from bottoming out and the ride quality changes very little if you add a much heavier rider (me). Installing it was very easy just as a regular inner tube (it is the same size). It is not like trying to install an inner tube inflated to the proper pressure like I read from somebody that never bought nor installed these tubes. An inner tube inflated to the proper pressure outside the tire would most likely explode or at the very least became very, very large. It is like installing an inner tube inflated enough to make installation easier and safer. Thats all. I always used to do that anyway.

After a month we went and outfitted all our bikes (five) with the momore flats. It has been over 2 years of piece of mind. Kids ride more because bicycle is always ready and I haven't had to change any tires because they are always inflated, at the right pressure and they are wearing out very little and very evenly.

The tubes are kind of expensive though but the piece of mind is priceless.

The ride is beautiful. I don't know about other brands (well I know about another one I will tell you) but nomore flats was a find from heaven.

I have to say that after such a good experience with nomore flats I decided to get inner tubes for an electric scooter that was getting flats and required too much work to repair. Nomore didn't have the right size inner tube so I looked around for other manufacturers. The only thing I could find in the scooter size (13x 1.75 I believe) was a nutek solid tire. So I replaced the tires and the inner tubes with this one solid unit. Installing it was a nightmare and at some point (after two hours fearing for my life) I finally got it. I went to ride and I noticed the scooter wondered everywhere, it felt like driving on flat tires, mushy and almost uncontrollable. Eventually while riding on a turn the tire came off and I hit the ground.

I will never buy solid tires again. Dangerous to say the least.
I will also always outfit my bicycles with nomor flats as soon as I own them.

So I hope my experience having installed and owned nomore flat inner tubes for over 3 years now is of some help.

By the way my wife rides her mountain bike everyday for over an hour sometimes more. If people were to try them instead of just talking out of what they have heard, what makes sense to them or what they have experienced with other manufacturers you would see nothing but praise in this forum.

They are that good!!
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Old 07-19-07, 10:07 PM
  #29  
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Jeff, you need to get over your fear of flats. It's inevitable and it's really simple to change a tube out in a matter of minutes. Keep your tires properly inflated, check your tires for wear and replace when necessary and watch the debris you ride over/through and try to avoid the nasty stuff and you'll rarely have flats.

Carry a spare tube and a CO2 cartridge and a pump for backup and you'll never have to worry about it.

Being prepared for flats and knowing how to deal with them is your best defense.

Hell, I ride 700x23c race tires and commute on them daily and I haven't had a flat in over 6 months. I run 110psi front and rear and check tire pressures prior to each ride.
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Old 07-20-07, 07:28 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by SDRider View Post
Jeff, you need to get over your fear of flats. It's inevitable and it's really simple to change a tube out in a matter of minutes. Keep your tires properly inflated, check your tires for wear and replace when necessary and watch the debris you ride over/through and try to avoid the nasty stuff and you'll rarely have flats.
All true but I try to prevent them to begin with.
I used to get flats constantly even with expensive kevlar tires until i got me some Tuffies. Those things rock, nothing is getting thru. Sidewalls can still be punctured but there's much less chance of that.
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Old 07-20-07, 07:51 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Andy Dreisch View Post
I replace a tube whenever I get a flat, no matter how long it's been -- time or distance. For me, this average out to about every 200-300 miles, maybe less. I get a lot of flats. In the rainy season, it's probably about every 100-200 miles. My buddies believe I have the world's highest FPM ratio (Flats per Mile).

And I always use Tuffies.

In my experience it's simply not worth the time or bother patching a tube. Standing in the rain, listening intently for an air leak while trucks and buses roar on by is not worth it in my view. Pop the new tube in (of course, after checking for the source as an earlier poster noted) and you're off.

Granted, this is not the most cost-efficient way to cycle, but tubes are cheap -- why risk another flat on a patch that goes bad or a tube that's just plain worn out?
I agree but I will fold the flat tube up and carry it home... I like to patch the flat one at home.
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Old 07-20-07, 07:56 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by d2create View Post
All true but I try to prevent them to begin with.
I used to get flats constantly even with expensive kevlar tires until i got me some Tuffies. Those things rock, nothing is getting thru. Sidewalls can still be punctured but there's much less chance of that.
I've never tried those. I remember riding with a guy once who had a nice Trek with Bontrager Race wheels. As we met in the parking lot for our ride he noticed his rear tire was flat so he pulled out the pump and spare tube along with his Tuffy liner and put a new tube in. I rode a century with him later that year and he had 3 flats on that ride. Turns out there was a burr on the inside of the rim and he needed a new rim.

If you are flatting constantly I'd suggest looking at your wheels to see if there might be something wrong with them. Constant flatting is not normal. I've ridden thousands of miles and rarely flat.

Last edited by SDRider; 07-20-07 at 08:10 AM.
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Old 07-20-07, 08:07 AM
  #33  
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Every cloud has its silver lining, right? When I get a flat, I end up meeting all kinds of people who offer help. Cyclists, folks in cars, etc. I kinda get the impression that a cool place for cyclists to hang out is at the next flat. The scene of a flat can become a coffee clutch within minutes.

Cyclist 1: "Hey man, there's someone up there fixing their tire".
Cyclist 2: "We're there, dude".
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Old 07-20-07, 08:23 AM
  #34  
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Main commuter has 700X35 Schwalbe Marathon Plus with Slime Tubes. Secondary commuter has 700X25 Conti Ultra Gatorskins & thorn resistant tubes. Overkill? Perhaps but since going that route I've has no issues with either bike for the past 9 months. Even with all that protection I check my tires once or twice a week for embedded glass, thorns etc etc.
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Old 07-20-07, 08:23 AM
  #35  
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What is a goathead?

I'm With hosehead.

Goatheads. Yep. Lots of 'em. I've tried:

Tubeless with stans goo = no flats in a year.
Mr. Tuffy = good, but I still got a few flats.
Slime filled tubes = great until the goo dries out (2 years?)
Plain tubes with slime = even better, since I get to pick the goo vs. weight factor.

Plain tubes with TruGoo = No flats in 800 miles of commuting this year. Goat heads sticking out of my tire at LEAST once a week, maybe more, I don't look or care. No problem! Best goo I've tried so far.

Next up for testing? , pre-loaded, "slime light" tubes.

I'm a "some kinda goo" flat prevention fan. You can keep your thorn resistant tires and tubes. These goatheads are almost designed for sticking into bike tires.

So what is a goathead?

Tribulus terrestris L.
(puncturevine)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=TRTE

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Old 07-20-07, 09:33 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Leiniesred View Post
I'm With hosehead.

Goatheads. Yep. Lots of 'em. I've tried:

Tubeless with stans goo = no flats in a year.
Mr. Tuffy = good, but I still got a few flats.
Slime filled tubes = great until the goo dries out (2 years?)
Plain tubes with slime = even better, since I get to pick the goo vs. weight factor.

Plain tubes with TruGoo = No flats in 800 miles of commuting this year. Goat heads sticking out of my tire at LEAST once a week, maybe more, I don't look or care. No problem! Best goo I've tried so far.

Next up for testing? , pre-loaded, "slime light" tubes.

I'm a "some kinda goo" flat prevention fan. You can keep your thorn resistant tires and tubes. These goatheads are almost designed for sticking into bike tires.
I guess I'm lucky. I've never come across these "goatheads" you speak of.
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Old 07-20-07, 09:43 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by SDRider View Post
If you are flatting constantly I'd suggest looking at your wheels to see if there might be something wrong with them. Constant flatting is not normal. I've ridden thousands of miles and rarely flat.
I think you are right that you've just been lucky.
Depends on the roads you ride on.
My flats always had a staple or nail or some other object that shouldn't have been there, sticking out of the tire.
Except for that one time I forgot to install rim tape.
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Old 06-04-18, 03:00 PM
  #38  
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Thanks for Inspiring Confidence

Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
Punctures are really no big deal. With good quality modern tyres you may get one or 2 a year. All you need to do is practice changing the tube for a new one, in a nice warm dry environment.
Specialized Armadillo are rated as the most puncture resistant conventional tyres.
Solid tyres are heavy and sluggish by comparison. You dont need to race to appreciate the advantages of air-filled tyres. They are better in every way but one.
See, just the first couple of sentences tell all. Be prepared, practice changing tires (comfortably), and then (THEN) worry about the absolute prevention of flats..

Thanks!!
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Old 06-05-18, 01:09 AM
  #39  
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Holy crap, kids born when this thread was started are getting their drivers licenses. Even the bump is 11yo
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Old 06-05-18, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
Holy crap, kids born when this thread was started are getting their drivers licenses. Even the bump is 11yo
Some topics never go out of style. I taught bike repair at a summer day camp a few years ago. One of the program administrators came up to me to tell me her amazing story. She didn't ride her bike often, and on the weekend, she and her husband took a bike ride. And she got a flat tire! A flat tire!
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Old 06-06-18, 11:08 AM
  #41  
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I didn't even notice how old this was until these last two posts!
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Old 06-06-18, 12:29 PM
  #42  
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Over a 9 month bike tour (97) with thorn resistant inner tubes
and a Finland made set of Utility tires, no punctures..

Dublin to Aberdeen , with a lot of Pubs along the way.

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Old 06-06-18, 12:44 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Andy Dreisch View Post
My take: don't bother with patches. I just use a spare tube I always carry. (Yes, I carry a patch kit in case I get another flat.)

I think tubes have a useful life of maybe a couple hundred miles at best. Don't know why exactly, but I've noticed this over the years.

Use a spare, ditch the tube, and move on. Much faster than patching, too. You can get a flat and be booking down the road again within a few minutes when you don't hassle with a patch.
My practice and experience is the opposite. I (nearly) always patch tires on the road. This does two things, Saves money. (Several hundred miles/tube? I've seen thousands.) And the patch tells you very fast where that puncture is relative to the tire casing, making searching the tire for the course far easier. (Here around Portland, OR. tiny threads of steel, the remnants of truck tire belts, are common. Often I find them in the tire completely hidden from sight. But with two flats in the same spot (or the same distance in the other direction from the valve) means that I know exactly where the cause is. (Always place your tire n the same place relative to the valve. I center the label there.)

Ben
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Old 06-06-18, 03:09 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by FrugalBiker View Post
Should all tubes be replaced after a certain number of miles, regardless of whether they've been flat-free, as routine maintenance? And is there a certain time recommendation, too, like "replace tubes after x miles or x years"? (This includes spare tubes that have been carried around but never used.)
I ”never” do routine replacement of tubes.
I carry one or two spares. If I get a flat mid-ride, I swap in a spare, pack the flatted one away, inflate and ride. Once home, I patch the flatted one, and it becomes the new spare.
IME there’s always a reason to eventually retire a tube. Valve damage, a dense cluster of patches etc. People have different criteria for when to replace. Some go by numbers. Me, I don’t patch patches.
I do inspect the spare(s) regularly. I’ve had them chafe themselves to to destruction in the saddlebag.
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Old 06-06-18, 03:25 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by SDRider View Post
Jeff, you need to get over your fear of flats. It's inevitable and it's really simple to change a tube out in a matter of minutes. Keep your tires properly inflated, check your tires for wear and replace when necessary and watch the debris you ride over/through and try to avoid the nasty stuff and you'll rarely have flats.

Carry a spare tube and a CO2 cartridge and a pump for backup and you'll never have to worry about it.
What he/she said. Except, I would skip the C02 cartridge and just get a good frame pump.
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Old 06-06-18, 05:06 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by LittleBigMan View Post
Sometimes, yes, it can be faster. But I had a flat last saturday from what looked like a staple, only thinner, which had worked it's way into my tire.
Probably a steel thread from steel belted tires that got damaged. Have had it happen.

Originally Posted by Andy Dreisch View Post
My take: don't bother with patches. I just use a spare tube I always carry. (Yes, I carry a patch kit in case I get another flat.)

I think tubes have a useful life of maybe a couple hundred miles at best. Don't know why exactly, but I've noticed this over the years.

Use a spare, ditch the tube, and move on. Much faster than patching, too. You can get a flat and be booking down the road again within a few minutes when you don't hassle with a patch.
You might want to change up the way that you ride. That's a lot of flats.

Originally Posted by FrugalBiker View Post
Should all tubes be replaced after a certain number of miles, regardless of whether they've been flat-free, as routine maintenance? And is there a certain time recommendation, too, like "replace tubes after x miles or x years"? (This includes spare tubes that have been carried around but never used.)
In a word, no. Tubes can last thousands of miles, even tens of thousands of miles. There is no need to replace them unless they are damaged beyond repair which usually means that the valve is damaged.

There is also no reason to replace them if they get a puncture...or 2...or 30. Learn to patch them. Just throwing them away after one puncture is costly and wasteful. A butyl tube costs $8 to $12 depending on the quality. If you replace it 30 times, that's $240. A Rema TipTop patch kit (get no other) cost about $3 and will fix up to 6 punctures so you'd need 5 kits to fix 30 flats. That's $15 and some time. I'd rather spend $225 on something else than tubes.

Originally Posted by Andy Dreisch View Post
In my experience it's simply not worth the time or bother patching a tube. Standing in the rain, listening intently for an air leak while trucks and buses roar on by is not worth it in my view. Pop the new tube in (of course, after checking for the source as an earlier poster noted) and you're off.

Granted, this is not the most cost-efficient way to cycle, but tubes are cheap -- why risk another flat on a patch that goes bad or a tube that's just plain worn out?
You don't stand around in the rain trying to patch a tube. You carry a spare tube and fix the punctured one later.

Tubes simply don't "wear out". They aren't wear items. I've taken tubes out of bikes that are from the 80s and still used the tube. I may give up on a tube around 30 patches but that's only because I feel I've gotten my money out of them by then.

On the other hand, if you don't learn how to patch tubes, someday you'll find that you have run out of tubes and you need to patch one. Best to have had some practice.
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Old 06-06-18, 07:02 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by FrugalBiker View Post
Should all tubes be replaced after a certain number of miles, regardless of whether they've been flat-free, as routine maintenance? And is there a certain time recommendation, too, like "replace tubes after x miles or x years"? (This includes spare tubes that have been carried around but never used.)
Tubes last until they catastrophically fail, usually by having the valve stem tear out, or by horrible installation. Until about five years ago, one of the ones in my rotation was made when Nixon was in the white house. On my commuting bike's current tubes has 13 patches in it. (note that's not 13 flats, my last flat required five patches to fix, because I had a 3" screw stick through the tube and make a bunch of holes on the far side). People who throw tubes away because they have a flat are throwing money away.
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Old 06-07-18, 09:57 AM
  #48  
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Something happens to my tubes to make them unusable before I put the ninth patch on them, for some reason. Sometimes it happens sooner. But eight patches ain't bad.
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Old 06-08-18, 01:08 AM
  #49  
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I think I have been riding to work and back for about 3 years now and I only do about 2,000 miles a year so far, but thanks to my Schwalbe Marathon Mondials, I have yet to have a flat tyre.
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Old 06-08-18, 12:44 PM
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2,000 miles a year is a lot!
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New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
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