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Odd Loads and Your Solutions for Carrying Them

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Odd Loads and Your Solutions for Carrying Them

Old 07-16-15, 06:32 PM
  #26  
tclune
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Originally Posted by Ubermich View Post
Whoa. I didn't know that was a thing. To me that sounds like time to vote!

Happen to have a pic of a bag loaded up on your ride?
Around here, it is common for garbage pick-up not to be covered by your property taxes. People either contract individually with a private service or buy garbage bags and a dump sticker that allows you to use the town transfer station. My wife did take a photo of me on my way to the center a year or two ago. If she still has it, I'll post it. BTW, there is a small business in town that collects garbage by bicycle. It's called Pedal People (https://www.pedalpeople.coop/index.php), and is a co-op of some sort. They also run a clinic on bicycle repairs every weekend for people who want to learn how to do their own repairs.

Last edited by tclune; 07-16-15 at 06:44 PM.
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Old 07-16-15, 07:23 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Ubermich View Post
Most of the panniers I've seen look like they would be too tight for a full gallon (maybe my eyes deceive me?)
Your eyes deceive you. I regularly haul gallons of milk in my commuting panniers, with room to spare. They're Ortleib Sport Packer Plus--the smaller of the two sizes made for the front. Of course, my grocery panniers swallow up milk, whole chickens, ten pound sacks of potatoes and onions. I even carry whole pork tenderloins in them. I stand it up on end and brace it with other stuff, then leave it sticking out the top, waving like a big meat flag.

Originally Posted by Ubermich View Post
What are some of the stranger cargo items you've hauled (or regularly haul) and how do you carry them? This might be oversized, fragile, or liquid loads.
Two things I've hauled probably fall into the stranger cargo item category.

First, I've hauled bikes two ways. First way was, I towed one. Took the front wheel off and set the fork dropouts on my rack. Bungeed it down nice and tight, then zip-tied the front wheel to the frame of the towed bike.

I've found it's a lot easier this second way. Just take off both wheels, zip-tie them to the frame, then strap the whole affair to my backpack using the load compression straps. Take care where that one pedal is pointed, though. Yikes!

For the second weird thing, I have pics.

A Saris BikeTrac wall-mount bike storage rack. I like them so much at home, I took one to work. Used my trunk bag to secure the back, and bungees for the middle and front. For the record, those are not the panniers I referred to above.





Here it is with the rack holding a bike, instead of the bike holding the rack.
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Old 07-16-15, 07:35 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by spare_wheel View Post
The one load that really gives me problems are the massive but flimsy boxes that my favorite vegan-friendly pizza place uses. I typically balance them precariously on my handlebars (which is not ideal). I suppose I could mount a large piece of thin wood on my shopping bike rack or buy a large trailer but I can't think of any other way to transport pizza that does not require a major expense or a major modification.
I saw a local genius carrying several using his oven rack bungee corded to his cargo rack.
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Old 07-16-15, 08:03 PM
  #29  
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I took and 8' stick of wood home the other day. I just bungeed it to the frame and let it stick out the front. I had the tag-along with progeny at the rear so all the extra was projecting forward.

I felt like I was going jousting.
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Old 07-16-15, 08:09 PM
  #30  
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Like tsl, I have also towed another cycle by zip tying the front drop-outs to the rack, but as it was a tricycle rather than a bicycle, this did not work as there was not enough flex in the system to get around corners so a zip tie broke before I even got 50'. Problem solved by hanging the front drops on a couple of padlocks I had in the panniers to allow for the bike to lean in corners while the trike did not.

That was about a 3 mile tow.
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Old 07-17-15, 07:27 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
I have a pair of Wald folding baskets attached to my rack.
They are on the heavy side, but can carry a lot of weight.
IF your commute is flat, the weight isn't too bothersome.
Initially, I "hung" them from the rack with "S" hooks and strapped down with bungie cords to make them easily removable.
I got N+1 for my other riding, so I mounted them permanently because they DID rattle over bumps etc.
+1 Wald foldong baskets.
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Old 07-17-15, 10:21 AM
  #32  
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I have panniers and routinely carry 2 gallons of water home with me. I use 4 half gallon jugs and put two on each side. Never had an issue with leakage.
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Old 07-17-15, 10:25 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Grillparzer View Post
I saw a local genius carrying several using his oven rack bungee corded to his cargo rack.
I've hauled some weird stuff on my motorcycle, but never did find a way to combine my loves of pizza and motorcycling at the same time.
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Old 07-17-15, 01:51 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
One of the hardest things I've found to carry on a bike are bike wheels! You can't strap them down very hard. They're big, awkward and just annoying to carry.
There are some backpacks specifically designed to carry wheels, otherwise the best bet is strap them together and hang them on the outside of a normal backpack.
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Old 07-17-15, 02:25 PM
  #35  
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I don't think I've ever seen a pannier that won't fit a gallon of milk unless it's one of those specifically labeled as 'mini' pannier.
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Old 07-17-15, 02:36 PM
  #36  
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So far, I've only hauled golf clubs on my burley travoy. However, it does come with a bag and other bags and straps are available for purchase as accessories. I'm sure someone could get quite creative in carrying all kinds of loads on this trailer.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXLfjmFgmqE

::Bike Trailer - Travoy Commute Bike Trailer - Burley--BURLEY--
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Old 07-17-15, 04:50 PM
  #37  
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Quarter sheet of plywood, parked after riding home from Home Depot. My rack and basket are level with one another, forming a "platform" that I can attach things to. I've also transported long boards and pieces of pipe by strapping them to the top tube and letting them stick out the front.

The basket easily holds a gallon of milk and a six pack.

Last edited by Gresp15C; 12-10-16 at 08:42 AM.
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Old 07-17-15, 05:04 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
Quarter sheet of plywood, parked after riding home from Home Depot.
Nice

I'm trying to figure out how to haul a couple of full 4x8 sheets. Only a couple of miles of mostly flat riding, but it has to happen over 100 miles from home.
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Old 07-17-15, 06:46 PM
  #39  
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Hauled my mountain bike 7 miles home on my cruiser yesterday. 4 zip ties and 3 bungee cords to tow it on the right basket
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Old 07-18-15, 07:40 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Nice

I'm trying to figure out how to haul a couple of full 4x8 sheets. Only a couple of miles of mostly flat riding, but it has to happen over 100 miles from home.
I've seen trucks hauling long concrete beams for bridges. One end is attached to the truck, the other to a set of wheels in the back. There's no trailer per se. So I suppose you could disassemble your trailer, C-Clamp the wheels to one end of the sheets and the tongue to the other end. Of course you have to watch out for going airborne in high winds.

What are you doing with plywood that requires full sheets? Even with a car, I've found it practical to let the lumber store make one or two cuts (usually for free) to the sizes that I actually need, in order to make the load more manageable in my little car.
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Old 07-18-15, 08:39 PM
  #41  
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my bicycles are cyclocross / sport touring with small baskets in front and on top of rear rack hauling groceries is easy for me 1 brown paper bag in each basket strapped down with plastic c-store bags hanging on each side of the baskets thats a full load. what i hate is carrying long wood boards or plastic pipe in arm like a shore wave surfer sometimes carry their surf boards.
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Old 07-18-15, 09:24 PM
  #42  
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Carrying a bike on my homemade trailer:

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Old 07-18-15, 09:42 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Gresp15C View Post
I've seen trucks hauling long concrete beams for bridges. One end is attached to the truck, the other to a set of wheels in the back. There's no trailer per se. So I suppose you could disassemble your trailer, C-Clamp the wheels to one end of the sheets and the tongue to the other end. Of course you have to watch out for going airborne in high winds.

What are you doing with plywood that requires full sheets? Even with a car, I've found it practical to let the lumber store make one or two cuts (usually for free) to the sizes that I actually need, in order to make the load more manageable in my little car.
I've thought about making some bunks for carrying tubing. I got a lazy susan (or bottom from a swivel chair???) that I planned to attach to the bike, and was going to make a wheelset that could be attached to the load.


Anyway, I have a shed that has a cedar single roof and slats that needs some TLC. Probably going to put plywood down, then composite shingles. I find it is much easier to work with full sheets of plywood than cut sheets.

I've tied sheets of plywood to the roof of cars before. I collapsed my roof rack years ago, and started just tying them to the roof.

But, the bike is a bit different.

The C-Clamp idea is good.

I was thinking of taking a kiddie trailer and getting some tubes to make it wider. Then adding a 3rd wheel dolly for the front.

My current cargo trailer would probably work. I had always planned to make a double layer frame. But, it is here, not there... and I need something that is easy to tow empty, or lightly loaded. My heavy cargo rig is not.
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Old 07-18-15, 09:43 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by Reynolds View Post
Carrying a bike on my homemade trailer:
haul odd on bicycle itself.
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Old 07-19-15, 08:46 PM
  #45  
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This milk crate measures 12" square inside, has hauled bedding plants, groceries, a pail of drywall mud, 20 lb propane bottle, overnight bag, backpacks, car batteries, and two rear axle shafts for a 1910 Mitchell.

The crate is zip-tied to the rear carrier, and has several spare spokes, more zip ties and a frame pump attached to the underside.
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Old 07-19-15, 09:07 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by Chris Bamford View Post
This milk crate measures 12" square inside, has hauled bedding plants, groceries, a pail of drywall mud, 20 lb propane bottle, overnight bag, backpacks, car batteries, and two rear axle shafts for a 1910 Mitchell.

The crate is zip-tied to the rear carrier, and has several spare spokes, more zip ties and a frame pump attached to the underside.
HAHA! I hadn't even considered the idea of using a MILK CRATE to carry milk! Thanks for the idea!

Did cars give you some extra space when you were hauling the propane bottle? And is the Mitchell yours? If so, got pics?
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Old 07-19-15, 09:18 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Chris Bamford View Post
...
The crate is zip-tied to the rear carrier, and has several spare spokes, more zip ties and a frame pump attached to the underside.
You know the man is serious when he KNOWS that he is going to break spokes and zip ties, and get flats.

Keep pushing the boundaries, man! Keep pushing!

Last edited by auldgeunquers; 07-19-15 at 09:19 PM. Reason: clarity
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Old 07-19-15, 11:04 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by Ubermich View Post
...And is the Mitchell yours? If so, got pics?
Not mine sadly, it belongs to a local club member and I was helping fettle the car after 20+ years of inactivity. Here is a photo from the Horseless Carriage Gazette, shot during a tour last year near Lake Louise, Alberta.

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Old 07-20-15, 06:09 AM
  #49  
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That is absolutely breathtaking! Thanks for sharing.
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Old 07-20-15, 11:29 AM
  #50  
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I live close to some cross country ski trails and don't always have access to a car. At first I used velcro straps to place on the top tube. It worked well enough except when the temperature drops to below -20C it's a bit too cold to put back on the bike afterwards. Someone at the local bike co-op made a PVC pannier attachment so I went to Home Depot and bought the supplies to make my own too! Much faster to pack up, only trouble is fitting through doorways and the elevator at my apartment. Have to take ski's out when going indoors.
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