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Building a very low maintenance ultra fast super commuter

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Building a very low maintenance ultra fast super commuter

Old 10-13-15, 11:12 AM
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If you have the coin for Ti, look into Lynskey frames. They have standardized geometry for various sizes, but can build a frame for you with a number of different options.

Check out this build thread for the Urbanskey frame/bike: https://www.bikeforums.net/commuting/...ter-build.html
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Old 10-13-15, 11:19 AM
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Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94
If you have the coin for Ti, look into Lynskey frames. They have standardized geometry for various sizes, but can build a frame for you with a number of different options.

Check out this build thread for the Urbanskey frame/bike: https://www.bikeforums.net/commuting/...ter-build.html
There's one that goes inside all the time...
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Old 10-13-15, 08:12 PM
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This german seems to be fast and they didn't erase the tire valves out.




I really like it: Randonneur XD | KOCMO Titan Bikes
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Old 10-13-15, 08:40 PM
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One issue with IGH (I have a bike with an IGH) is that if you get a flat on your rear wheel, you will have a much, much harder time fixing the flat. You have to get the wheel off and it will take a lot more work to do that, than a more standard wheel with rear derailleur. Not saying it's impossible, because there's video of somebody doing just that, but after you see the amount of work that must be done, you just might conclude that maintenance on a derailleur bike might not be so horrible after all.

That is the trade-off with IGH. It's "low maintenance" until something happens to your rear wheel.

Also the gearing is usually might wider with a standard cassette and crankset - which means greater top speed and all that. You can see this for yourself with the Sheldon Brown gear calculator. Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

Now if you live in Minnesota or someplace like that where you get lots and lots of snow, I could see the justification for getting a bike with IGH. I don't think its a coincidence that the majority of IGH users on these forums live in places where it rains/snows a lot.

Then again, you can't just casually throw on studded tires and take them off again after winter like you can with standard bikes, because of the work involved. Or even have a pair of winter wheels preloaded with studded tire that you can casually plug into your bike with relatively little effort.

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Old 10-14-15, 09:47 AM
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[MENTION=409376]GovernorSilver[/MENTION], which rear hub do you have? I don't doubt that yours is hard to remove, but I haven't yet found one that's hard for me. All it takes is a little practice.
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Old 10-14-15, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by NormanF
I would say if you're going to run IGH - either go carbon fiber or aluminum. Keeping the frame weight down is important because the hub is already heavy. You want it to ride smooth and fast like a derailleur bike.
Really? for 2 lbs? I have steel frames that are 3.9lbs, and carbon frames are typically around 2lbs. If those two pounds make that much of a difference, upgrade your other components.
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Old 10-14-15, 11:49 AM
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You can upgrade to lighter tires for instance. That will make a difference in the feel.
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Old 10-14-15, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider
@GovernorSilver, which rear hub do you have? I don't doubt that yours is hard to remove, but I haven't yet found one that's hard for me. All it takes is a little practice.
Now that I think about it, I was actually thinking more about the chaincase and how that has to be opened up before I can even get at the wheel.
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Old 10-14-15, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by GovernorSilver
One issue with IGH (I have a bike with an IGH) is that if you get a flat on your rear wheel, you will have a much, much harder time fixing the flat. You have to get the wheel off and it will take a lot more work to do that, than a more standard wheel with rear derailleur. Not saying it's impossible, because there's video of somebody doing just that, but after you see the amount of work that must be done, you just might conclude that maintenance on a derailleur bike might not be so horrible after all.

That is the trade-off with IGH. It's "low maintenance" until something happens to your rear wheel.

Also the gearing is usually might wider with a standard cassette and crankset - which means greater top speed and all that. You can see this for yourself with the Sheldon Brown gear calculator. Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

Now if you live in Minnesota or someplace like that where you get lots and lots of snow, I could see the justification for getting a bike with IGH. I don't think its a coincidence that the majority of IGH users on these forums live in places where it rains/snows a lot.

Then again, you can't just casually throw on studded tires and take them off again after winter like you can with standard bikes, because of the work involved. Or even have a pair of winter wheels preloaded with studded tire that you can casually plug into your bike with relatively little effort.
Originally Posted by noglider
@GovernorSilver, which rear hub do you have? I don't doubt that yours is hard to remove, but I haven't yet found one that's hard for me. All it takes is a little practice.
That's frequently mentioned as a downside to having an IGH but unless you have a full chaincase or other additional pieces it doesn't add a whole lot of time in practice.

With an IGH you won't have a quick release so that you'll need a wrench. You also have to release the shift cable which is trickier with some hubs (shimano) than others but once you get the knack it can be done in a manner of seconds, -not minutes.

Finally, if you have drum or roller brakes the reaction arm must be detached. When I had a roller brake I attached it with a wing nut so I could remove it without tools. But even with a wrench, it's a simple process.

So there are definitely some extra steps but all of them together take less time then replacing a tube if you have practiced once or twice, - and you definitely should.
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Old 10-14-15, 01:12 PM
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Even a chaincase isn't that bad once you know how. It might be a lot of steps. To me, "hard" means doing it the right way but it doesn't respond. Or you have to push or pull hard. Or you can't figure it out from one time to the next.
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Old 10-14-15, 09:02 PM
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I've found another cool bike that I will just need to figure to put the drops and be able to shift the nuvinci.
The Vanhawks Valour
May get a bit of drag on the hub but still should be very reliable and the price is not an arm and a leg considering the carbon frame.
I'm picturing a way to get the shifter on the dropbars probably will have to be rohloff style Gebla Rohbox.
The XL frame plus dropbars and a 140mm stem will have the bike matching my geometry.
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Old 10-15-15, 06:01 AM
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Good looking bike. That should fit your needs well!

It does need drop bars, but it would be a shame to throw out that slick Valour custom integrated stem/handlebar
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Old 10-15-15, 08:11 AM
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With a bike that expensive and carefully designed, I wouldn't be to hasty to make changes. Try it a while before you modify it.
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Old 10-15-15, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider
Even a chaincase isn't that bad once you know how. It might be a lot of steps. To me, "hard" means doing it the right way but it doesn't respond. Or you have to push or pull hard. Or you can't figure it out from one time to the next.
Yeah, I'm being a bit of a wuss here. I'm thinking of volunteering at a local nonprofit bike shop to gain experience working on bikes.
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Old 10-15-15, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by GovernorSilver
Yeah, I'm being a bit of a wuss here. I'm thinking of volunteering at a local nonprofit bike shop to gain experience working on bikes.
I hope you manage to do that. I know time can limit the things we do. You will learn stuff and have fun.
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Old 10-15-15, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider
With a bike that expensive and carefully designed, I wouldn't be to hasty to make changes. Try it a while before you modify it.
Heck i'd pick another bike. Has the OP looked at Co-Motion bikes yet? They make Roholff models.
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Old 10-25-15, 02:26 PM
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I'm doing a custom Ti build.
So far I've got some parts and drew the frame: Charles Custom DI2 Belt Cyclocross Disc | www.bikecad.ca and without me on top easier to see: https://www.bikecad.ca/1445555108880

Almost all parts ordered, waiting on details for headset, handlebar and seatpost. Still confirming details with the frame also.
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Old 10-26-15, 04:23 AM
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Originally Posted by charlesrg
I'm doing a custom Ti build.
Big bike for a big guy.

Who is your builder?
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Old 10-26-15, 06:56 AM
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So far I've been drawing and getting the right geometry. Haven't decided yet, have been considering Titan, XACD and Waltly.
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Old 10-28-15, 12:31 PM
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Originally Posted by charlesrg
I'm doing a custom Ti build.
So far I've got some parts and drew the frame: Charles Custom DI2 Belt Cyclocross Disc | www.bikecad.ca and without me on top easier to see: Charles Custom DI2 Belt Cyclocross Disc | www.bikecad.ca

Almost all parts ordered, waiting on details for headset, handlebar and seatpost. Still confirming details with the frame also.
Since you're going custom, why not level the top tube? Level top tubes just look so much more classic to me. Or you just prefer it sloped, or need it for standover clearance?
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Old 10-28-15, 05:57 PM
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IMHO....the ultimate fast commuter is a disc brake CX bike, with 33-38c file tread gravel tires. It can handle any weather condition, goes off road without issues(@45psi), flies on road(@70psi), CX gearing is ideal for undulating rollers, disc brakes handle 45mph+ descents and can stop in the wet, etc. Add a mountain cassette(11-32/11-34) and steep urban climbs are nothing.

I converted my old 26" Cannondale hardtail MTB into a 19-pound, 700c flat bar, urban/rural path rocket. Super low maintenance and takes all the drudgery out of 40-mile commutes:



Originally Posted by charlesrg
So far I've been drawing and getting the right geometry. Haven't decided yet, have been considering Titan, XACD and Waltly.
Look into Siren of Colorado, too. They custom-fab beautiful, Lynskey/Eriksen-level ti frames...
https://www.facebook.com/sirenbicycles

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Old 10-28-15, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94
Since you're going custom, why not level the top tube? Level top tubes just look so much more classic to me. Or you just prefer it sloped, or need it for standover clearance?
I feel like the smaller triangles would make it less flexible. the seapost will be more extended but less flexible when pounding out of the saddle.
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Old 10-28-15, 06:58 PM
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You can leave the fenders off in winter. They are not useful -- actually a detriment in ice and now.
Hydraulics are good. I've had moisture get into brake cables and freeze them up solid.
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Old 12-19-15, 06:55 PM
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Wanted to give you guys an update on this project.

So far I've all the components and a frame diagram.

This will run with Hydraulic brakes and Shimano Alfine Di2.


I've the wheels ready waiting for it. Perhaps will have it mid january.
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Old 12-20-15, 03:55 PM
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I think it will be a great bike, far beyond any production weeniefied pos. Glad you are going without clunky fussbucket derailleurs. Going with 180 cranks eh, good? That's what I use and I'm 5'8. ha At least the A11 has a very good gear range, The trouble with a belt drive is very limited choice. 55/26 best or 50/24 I expect for Charles. Most important is the 7th cruise gear, 73.1 or 74.3 GI. Want low 20s, then get a Rohloff.

My Rohloff and Sturmey Archer 5w certainly will now go 4,000 miles with no tinkering, except the chain. My SA has 72.5 GI in the direct drive middle, which is fabulous for cruising at 19 mph nearing wizzout. 21/ 22 mph = lugging the motor. Shifting twice from zero to 31 mph sure beats derailleur nonsense.

..... And my bike weighs double+ than this bike.

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