Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

If you could afford an e-bike, would it be your "go to" commuter?

Notices
Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

If you could afford an e-bike, would it be your "go to" commuter?

Old 10-23-15, 11:42 AM
  #1  
InTheRain
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,976

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
If you could afford an e-bike, would it be your "go to" commuter?

I have an e-bike that I use as a commuter. I absolutely love riding it. It really makes my commute enjoyable and easy. I'm always wondering what it is that keeps people from going the e-bike route - especially for commuting. I read an interesting article the other day about e-bikes and the growth in the Netherlands. E-bike sales accounted for 47 percent of the revenue from bike sales.

https://www.nltimes.nl/2015/10/21/dut...ke-sales-soar/

Is it the initial cost of an e-bike that makes bicycle commuters in North America shy away from an e-bike? If you could afford an e-bike as a commuter, would it be your first choice. Why.. or why not? The Dutch seem to be going the way of the e-bike. They seem to be the world leaders in using bicycles for transportation. I present these questions in the commuting forum because I believe that is the best use for an e-bike. I see a lot of threads in the forum about making a bike lighter for speed or better hill climbing. I see other threads that discuss how to carry a load, or reduce a load, for a commute. It seems that an e-bike solves these commute related problems and issues.

I would love to hear your thoughts.

Edit 10/30/2015: Thoughts have been expressed. It appears that an e-bike is not an ideal commuter. Don't waste your time reading through the thread.

Last edited by InTheRain; 10-30-15 at 01:16 PM.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 11:52 AM
  #2  
AlmostTrick
Tortoise Wins by a Hare!
 
AlmostTrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Looney Tunes, IL
Posts: 6,973

Bikes: Wabi Special FG, Raleigh Roper, Nashbar AL-1, Miyata One Hundred, '70 Schwinn Lemonator and More!!

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1340 Post(s)
Liked 516 Times in 290 Posts
I could very easily afford one, or 20, but just have no need for it. If it's too far to pedal, I drive my Big American Car.
AlmostTrick is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 11:53 AM
  #3  
kickstart
Senior Member
 
kickstart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Kent Wa.
Posts: 5,332

Bikes: 2005 Gazelle Golfo, 1935 Raleigh Sport, 1970 Robin Hood sport, 1974 Schwinn Continental, 1984 Ross MTB/porteur, 2013 Flying Piegon path racer, 2014 Gazelle Toer Populair T8

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Yes, if decent E-bikes were more affordable I would have one.
kickstart is offline  
Likes For kickstart:
Old 10-23-15, 11:56 AM
  #4  
mozad655
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 290
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I would never buy or use an e-bike even if it was given to me for free. I cannot imagine the hassles that come with a battery. Constantly having to charge it. I hate just charging my bicycle lights. Not to mention the electricity bill. In addition to this comes issues like repairs, if you fall and break it.

And all of this for what? For some extra power? I don't need extra power. If I did then I would just buy a motorcycle or scooter which are treated the same as bicycles where I live. I like the fact that cycling is simple and all the power comes from inside my own body. An e-bike defeats that purpose.

That being said I do see more and more of them. More people are definately buying them. But I will never be one of them.
mozad655 is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:11 PM
  #5  
ChicagoDan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: IL
Posts: 58

Bikes: Breezer Uptown 8, Fuji Tread, Montague Navigator

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One of the main reasons I commute by bike is for the workout, so I would not use an e-bike.
ChicagoDan is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:11 PM
  #6  
InTheRain
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,976

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by mozad655 View Post
I cannot imagine the hassles that come with a battery. Constantly having to charge it. I hate just charging my bicycle lights. Not to mention the electricity bill.
I appreciate your opinion. However, I think you're a bit off concerning the "electricity bill." It costs all of 7 cents to charge my battery from completely empty to full. I rarely deplete the battery past 50 percent. Most of the time I recharge when there is 60 to 70 percent charge still left. For me, it's convenient. My e-bike sits right next to me at work and it's charging while I work. I figure it costs less than 2 cents in electricity costs to get my daily charge - and I'm using my employer's electricity.

As far as being "simple." My e-bike is so much more simple to ride than my road bike. But yes, I like the exercise aspect of cycling, too. However, I don't commute necessarily for exercise. I get a little bit of a workout. I might burn 150 calories each way on the e-bike commute. I can make it as hard as I want by using less of a pedal assist, or I can make it a real killer workout by putting the e-bike in regen mode where I'm actually pushing against the electric motor and recharging the battery - but, then again, that's not my purpose with the e-bike. It's much more fun to get my exercise with a carbon fiber road bike.
InTheRain is offline  
Likes For InTheRain:
Old 10-23-15, 12:14 PM
  #7  
InTheRain
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,976

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by ChicagoDan View Post
One of the main reasons I commute by bike is for the workout, so I would not use an e-bike.
I understand.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:20 PM
  #8  
Leebo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 5,680

Bikes: Kona Dawg, Surly 1x1, Karate Monkey, Rockhopper, Crosscheck , Burley Runabout,

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 840 Post(s)
Liked 73 Times in 54 Posts
50 -60 lbs, ugg, why? It's only 18 miles one way, why would I need an electric motorcycle? No kids, heavy cargo or long distances, those make sense for some battery stuff. $ not and issue. Depending on season, I have 5 commuters to chose from.
Leebo is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:25 PM
  #9  
PatrickGSR94
Senior Member
 
PatrickGSR94's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Memphis TN area
Posts: 7,393

Bikes: 2011 Felt Z85 (road/commuter), 2006 Marin Pine Mountain (utility/commuter E-bike), 1995 KHS Alite 1000 (gravel grinder)

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 674 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
If not for the cost I would probably have one. At the very least to help haul heavy loads from the grocery store faster, because a grocery trip takes 2 hours now, nearly half of that spent pedaling slowly. I would prefer a cargo bike with e-assist, something that could also carry my son, or perhaps even my son and my wife. Then we could possibly sell both of our cars and get my wife a newer car.

An e-bike would certainly make my hilly 31 mile RT commute easier, and faster. Faster would be great for me since I already have to leave at 6 am and don't get home until 6 pm on days I ride, because I'm slow. Don't get to see my family much on those days. E-bike would cut that time way down. But, I've been pedaling that commute for over 2 years now as a way to get in physical activity, and I would feel like I'm cheating myself out of that physical activity if I went the e-bike route for commuting purposes.
PatrickGSR94 is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:26 PM
  #10  
mozad655
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 290
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by InTheRain View Post
I appreciate your opinion. However, I think you're a bit off concerning the "electricity bill." It costs all of 7 cents to charge my battery from completely empty to full. I rarely deplete the battery past 50 percent. Most of the time I recharge when there is 60 to 70 percent charge still left. For me, it's convenient. My e-bike sits right next to me at work and it's charging while I work. I figure it costs less than 2 cents in electricity costs to get my daily charge - and I'm using my employer's electricity.

As far as being "simple." My e-bike is so much more simple to ride than my road bike. But yes, I like the exercise aspect of cycling, too. However, I don't commute necessarily for exercise. I get a little bit of a workout. I might burn 150 calories each way on the e-bike commute. I can make it as hard as I want by using less of a pedal assist, or I can make it a real killer workout by putting the e-bike in regen mode where I'm actually pushing against the electric motor and recharging the battery - but, then again, that's not my purpose with the e-bike. It's much more fun to get my exercise with a carbon fiber road bike.
Okay I didn't know it was that cheap. If that's true then it is very economical. But that was never my main concern. I'm still not sure about battery life, both on a daily basis and eventually over long period of time. All batteries that I have owned wear out with time and lose efficiency.

As for simplicity, an e-bike is an electrical machine. It is by default more complicated than 99% of regular bicycles. I don't know about the exercise thing. That's not really what I was thinking about. I hate exercise on bikes. I ride bikes for comfort and simplicity. Part of that comfort and simplicity is knowing that its all you running this thing. An e-bike would just break that bond between me and my bike because I'm no longer the engine.
mozad655 is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:29 PM
  #11  
I-Like-To-Bike
Banned.
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 28,110

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 290 Times in 180 Posts
Originally Posted by InTheRain View Post
I see a lot of threads in the forum about making a bike lighter for speed or better hill climbing.
I would love to hear your thoughts.
IMO, most of the threads/questions about increasing speed or lighter weight, on this forum are from faux racers or inexperienced cyclists bedazzled by Internet chatter by Club Cyclists/Experienced Enthusiasts™/LBS personnel. E-bikes are not the answer for these types.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:31 PM
  #12  
PatrickGSR94
Senior Member
 
PatrickGSR94's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Memphis TN area
Posts: 7,393

Bikes: 2011 Felt Z85 (road/commuter), 2006 Marin Pine Mountain (utility/commuter E-bike), 1995 KHS Alite 1000 (gravel grinder)

Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 674 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by mozad655 View Post
Okay I didn't know it was that cheap. If that's true then it is very economical. But that was never my main concern. I'm still not sure about battery life, both on a daily basis and eventually over long period of time. All batteries that I have owned wear out with time and lose efficiency.

As for simplicity, an e-bike is an electrical machine. It is by default more complicated than 99% of regular bicycles. I don't know about the exercise thing. That's not really what I was thinking about. I hate exercise on bikes. I ride bikes for comfort and simplicity. Part of that comfort and simplicity is knowing that its all you running this thing. An e-bike would just break that bond between me and my bike because I'm no longer the engine.
You're thinking of e-bikes with just a throttle. Many e-bikes are pedal-assist, which IMHO is the better solution. You still have to pedal, but it gives you an extra kick of power to supplement your pedaling. And most pedal-assist systems cut out around 20 MPH, so if you pedal faster than that you won't be getting any assist anyway.

E-bikes with a throttle really are just "cheating" in my mind.
PatrickGSR94 is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:32 PM
  #13  
Squeeze
High Plains Luddite
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Colorado
Posts: 593

Bikes: Surly Cross Check, 1990s MTBs

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 161 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 13 Posts
No way. I ride for exercise and fun, among other reasons. If I want to just sit still and steer, I'll drive my car instead.
Squeeze is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:37 PM
  #14  
mozad655
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 290
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94 View Post
You're thinking of e-bikes with just a throttle. Many e-bikes are pedal-assist, which IMHO is the better solution. You still have to pedal, but it gives you an extra kick of power to supplement your pedaling. And most pedal-assist systems cut out around 20 MPH, so if you pedal faster than that you won't be getting any assist anyway.

E-bikes with a throttle really are just "cheating" in my mind.
Its all the same to me. I want to be the full source of power. If I wanted a machine that runs on an engine and all the hassle that comes with that, then I would just buy a motorcycle or car. I don't want interference from machines. e-bikes are bicycle-blasphemy to me. thet go against the beauty and simplicity of bicycles and the bond that you have with it when you and only you are pushing yourself forward. but I do recognize that they are a good solution if you live in a mountain area or pull a heavy load on a regular basis. but as a bicycle for a regular commuter? not nessescary at all.

Last edited by mozad655; 10-23-15 at 12:44 PM.
mozad655 is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:38 PM
  #15  
InTheRain
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,976

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by mozad655 View Post
Okay I didn't know it was that cheap. If that's true then it is very economical. But that was never my main concern. I'm still not sure about battery life, both on a daily basis and eventually over long period of time. All batteries that I have owned wear out with time and lose efficiency.

As for simplicity, an e-bike is an electrical machine. It is by default more complicated than 99% of regular bicycles. I don't know about the exercise thing. That's not really what I was thinking about. I hate exercise on bikes. I ride bikes for comfort and simplicity. Part of that comfort and simplicity is knowing that its all you running this thing. An e-bike would just break that bond between me and my bike because I'm no longer the engine.
I'm not too good of a wrench and I don't do much to my bikes other than the basic maintenance. I don't have the patience to learn how to make some of the adjustments on my derailleurs other than the simple twist of a barrel adjuster. So, unless the bike is a single speed, it's complicated enough for me. I haven't had any issues with the electric motor. But yes, if there is a problem, I'll have to take it to a dealer.

Yes, my battery will wear out. Based on the way I currently use it and charge it, I've been advised that I should get between 2000 - 4000 charges. I figure I'll be charging it about 200 times per year if I continue to ride like I do (I still commute at times with my carbon fiber bike or a scooter.) I imagine that I'll be ready for something new or different by the time the battery goes. But, a replacement is stinkin' expensive! The replacement for my battery is $1200 - so yes, I hear ya.

Also, my e-bike is pedal assist only. If I don't pedal, it doesn't move.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:40 PM
  #16  
I-Like-To-Bike
Banned.
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 28,110

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 290 Times in 180 Posts
Originally Posted by InTheRain View Post
But, a replacement is stinkin' expensive! The replacement for my battery is $1200 - so yes, I hear ya.
Yeow! How much is the cost of the entire e-bike?
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:55 PM
  #17  
InTheRain
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,976

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Yeow! How much is the cost of the entire e-bike?
The bike started out as a touring bike that I used as a commuter. Initial cost was $1400. I made changes and added accessories (fenders, racks, lights, changed the saddle and bars, added pedals, panniers, disc brakes (expensive modification)... so much, too much to continue listing.) I really like the utility, geometry, and feel of the bike. When I went to look for e-bikes I couldn't find anything close to the bike I already had and loved riding. (I can't recall seeing an e-bike with drop bars.) So, I was well over $2000 into this bike. I went with a BionX e-bike kit. Cost of the kit was $2400 with installation. Yep... and $1200 of that is the battery. So yes, I'm into this about $5000+ (dang, as I start to add things up, this really is expensive!)

I can try to justify it. It really is a car replacement for me. We have two cars (3 drivers) and we get by fine, but others in my same situation have a 3rd car they use as a commuter. I don't pay for gas, insurance, car maintenance, or parking. But hey, there are cheaper e-bike options out there than mine. Also, If I were really budget minded, I could commute on a $100 used bike.

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
commuter bike-2.jpg (99.2 KB, 708 views)

Last edited by InTheRain; 10-23-15 at 01:01 PM.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:59 PM
  #18  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,097
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by InTheRain View Post
I have an e-bike that I use as a commuter. I absolutely love riding it. It really makes my commute enjoyable and easy. I'm always wondering what it is that keeps people from going the e-bike route - especially for commuting. I read an interesting article the other day about e-bikes and the growth in the Netherlands. E-bike sales accounted for 47 percent of the revenue from bike sales.

Dutch bike over 1,000 km per year as e-bike sales soar - NL Times

Is it the initial cost of an e-bike that makes bicycle commuters in North America shy away from an e-bike? If you could afford an e-bike as a commuter, would it be your first choice. Why.. or why not? The Dutch seem to be going the way of the e-bike. They seem to be the world leaders in using bicycles for transportation. I present these questions in the commuting forum because I believe that is the best use for an e-bike. I see a lot of threads in the forum about making a bike lighter for speed or better hill climbing. I see other threads that discuss how to carry a load, or reduce a load, for a commute. It seems that an e-bike solves these commute related problems and issues.

I would love to hear your thoughts.
While e-bikes represented 47% of revenue from bike sales, they only accounted for 25% of new bike sales. Of course, the majority of Dutch cyclists didn't buy new bikes last year so e-bikes still are well in the minority.

25% is nothing to sneeze at, but we should be clear on what we are talking about.

For me a large part of the appeal of riding a bike is the human powered aspect of it, so for the most part I'm not terribly interested in e-bikes. However, winter in these parts creates huge problems for bicycle commuters. Many of us tough it out anyway but frankly two wheeled machines that leave you exposed to the elements aren't exactly ideal winter transportation.

Add a third wheel for stability and an enclosure of some type then you'd have something that would appeal to more commuters. However, pushing two wheels through snow is difficult enough, 3 would be even harder. Plus now you'd have the added weight of an enclosure. In my mind some sort of pedal assist would be required to make something like that workable.

Of course, once you add an enclosure, a motor, a 3rd wheel, and maybe some extra cargo space, it might be more of a micro-motor vehicle than a bike.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 12:59 PM
  #19  
AlmostTrick
Tortoise Wins by a Hare!
 
AlmostTrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Looney Tunes, IL
Posts: 6,973

Bikes: Wabi Special FG, Raleigh Roper, Nashbar AL-1, Miyata One Hundred, '70 Schwinn Lemonator and More!!

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1340 Post(s)
Liked 516 Times in 290 Posts
Sounds pretty fancy, ITR. Pics Please!
AlmostTrick is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 01:04 PM
  #20  
InTheRain
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,976

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I edited the post above and included a picture of the bike.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 01:09 PM
  #21  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 39,000

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2234 Post(s)
Liked 924 Times in 479 Posts
No. If I wanted to ride a scooter, I would get a Vespa.
caloso is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 01:18 PM
  #22  
InTheRain
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,976

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
While e-bikes represented 47% of revenue from bike sales, they only accounted for 25% of new bike sales. Of course, the majority of Dutch cyclists didn't buy new bikes last year so e-bikes still are well in the minority.

25% is nothing to sneeze at, but we should be clear on what we are talking about.

For me a large part of the appeal of riding a bike is the human powered aspect of it, so for the most part I'm not terribly interested in e-bikes. However, winter in these parts creates huge problems for bicycle commuters. Many of us tough it out anyway but frankly two wheeled machines that leave you exposed to the elements aren't exactly ideal winter transportation.

Add a third wheel for stability and an enclosure of some type then you'd have something that would appeal to more commuters. However, pushing two wheels through snow is difficult enough, 3 would be even harder. Plus now you'd have the added weight of an enclosure. In my mind some sort of pedal assist would be required to make something like that workable.

Of course, once you add an enclosure, a motor, a 3rd wheel, and maybe some extra cargo space, it might be more of a micro-motor vehicle than a bike.
I guess if you're riding a two wheeled bike in wintery conditions anyway, I don't see how adding a motor and battery makes that a worse situation. It's not something I deal with much... mostly just rain.

223,000 e-bike sales in one year in a country that has a population of 16.8 million is quite significant. I hope the trend continues to grow. Getting cars off the road reduces congestion for those that don't have the option to commute by bicycle. For those of that do commute by bike, I think the majority of us do it because we like it, and not so much out of necessity. I haven't noticed a decrease in enjoyment by adding an electric motor to my bike (actually, it's been an increase.)

As far as the weight goes... it's been a non-issue with me. The motor has taken care of that problem. I carry stuff in my panniers that I know I don't need. (I only empty the top half each day... I couldn't tell you for sure, what all is below that.) There are a lot of utility/cargo bikes out there now that come with the option of an electric motor.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 01:21 PM
  #23  
InTheRain
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,976

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by caloso View Post
No. If I wanted to ride a scooter, I would get a Vespa.
I have a scooter, too. It has it's place and time when it's better to be on than any bike. It's not a Vespa (my first choice, too)... 50cc yamaha. Scooters are not allowed on the MUP's. Scooters required to be licensed and a license to operate.
InTheRain is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 01:32 PM
  #24  
ganchan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think it would be too heavy for me to lug in and out of my apartment -- and if it ran out of juice, pedaling a boat anchor like that uphill might prove too challenging for my wimpy self. If my current bike craps out on me, I can walk it or even carry it without a problem.

Of course, the Dutch have always been fine with heavy bikes....
ganchan is offline  
Old 10-23-15, 01:41 PM
  #25  
InTheRain
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Puget Sound
Posts: 1,976

Bikes: 2007 Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 (bionx), 2015 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by ganchan View Post
I think it would be too heavy for me to lug in and out of my apartment -- and if it ran out of juice, pedaling a boat anchor like that uphill might prove too challenging for my wimpy self. If my current bike craps out on me, I can walk it or even carry it without a problem.

Of course, the Dutch have always been fine with heavy bikes....

Yep, e-bikes are heavy in comparison. My bike was 30+ lbs before I converted it to an e-bike. It would have been no joy to lug up stairs even in that condition. The conversion kit added 19 lbs to the bike. It's not unusual for e-bikes to weigh between 45 and 70 pounds.

As far as running out of juice... that's probably more likely to happen in my car than my e-bike. The bike is a commuter. I know exactly what I need for the commute. My battery has at least 5 times the capacity for the commute. I could ride/push my e-bike home a lot easier than I could my car.

Last edited by InTheRain; 10-23-15 at 01:45 PM.
InTheRain is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.