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Good training video for a beginner commuter

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Good training video for a beginner commuter

Old 05-12-16, 11:16 PM
  #26  
Bike Gremlin
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Originally Posted by Jaywalk3r View Post
Correct, but it usually is. It is the default behavior of the wise urban bicyclist, practiced unless there is a specific reason not to. However, if one finds themselves riding on a nice, wide (14+ feet between lane marker and beginning of gutter) lane that is clean and in good repair, with nothing blocking the view from cross streets, then it might be practicable to ride right, only 4-5 feet from the curb. In my experience riding in many states and cities, such conditions are, while certainly not nonexistent, fairly rare.
I disagree. But that is from my experience. Perhaps what you're saying goes for all the USA. Riding in my city, it would be a very bad idea to take the lane in some streets. Dangerous. Either someone might hit you, or come out of the car to beat you.

Also, what I saw in Italy, cyclist are expected to stay in the right hand side of the lane. 0 right hook attempts - people are used to cyclists and motorcyclists, but they expect bicycles to stay in the right meter, big motorcycles next to them, while small scooters filter between the two lanes, on the left side of cars in their lanes. And it all works. Taking the lane there, even with a motorcycle is a total nonsense.
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Old 05-12-16, 11:47 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Slaninar View Post
I disagree. But that is from my experience. Perhaps what you're saying goes for all the USA.
Yes, I'm referring to the USA.
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Old 05-13-16, 12:03 AM
  #28  
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The problem with finding "good definitive" information or videos is tat there's close to zero agreement on the smartest way to ride bikes. And everybody is convinced that his way is right and everybody else is wrong.

IMO --- and for the record, I think I'm right --- there's more than one way to approach urban bicycling, and no way is right for everybody or every condition. There are times I'll take the lane, times I'll ride to the right, times I'll hop on an uncrowded sidewalk. I'll choose roads based on pavement, traffic volume and speed, lane width and overall quality of ride. In short, it's all situational, and the key to staying safety is to understand the variables and adjust your conduct accordingly.

As far as the old gent coworker, I suggest you mind your own business unless asked. He's comfortable on the sidewalk, and making it work for him. If you convince him to ride in the street, it may be safer or it may not. Either way, you'll have bought into his risk factors and if things work out badly for any reason, you'll catch the blame.
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Old 05-13-16, 12:34 AM
  #29  
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I have learned over the last year or so that if you give a driver an inch, they will take a foot. Hugging the curb is dangerous. I feel like if you are out riding on the road and there is no bike lane, take the lane, especially if there is more than one lane in your direction. You hug the curb area you are just asking for a close pass. I would rather give the driver behind me the illusion that he/she cannot pass in the lane if I am taking it vs they might have room if I am off to the side.
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Old 05-13-16, 03:41 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Eds0123 View Post
A co worker has started bike commuting and he rides mostly on sidewalks. He could use some encouragement and video training for riding with the traffic in the streets…

Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
As far as the old gent coworker, I suggest you mind your own business unless asked. He's comfortable on the sidewalk, and making it work for him. If you convince him to ride in the street, it may be safer or it may not. Either way, you'll have bought into his risk factors and if things work out badly for any reason, you'll catch the blame.
Well said @FB. When I read the OP, I just assumed that this advice was solicited. But if proffered gratuitously, the poster may come across, as he perceived “ a smart ass know it all jerk.” I have previously posted my own “Captain Bringdown” opinion about giving advice.

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Frankly, I have posted that I would not be inclined to encourage, unless by example (nor discourage) someone to cycle-commute, but if they so chose, I would freely and gladly give any advice...

Public exhortations to cycle-commute, or utility cycle are well and good with no individual responsibility for bad outcomes, but I would not want the recriminations of a personal endorsement if something bad happened. Also, with regards to “recreational cycling,” actual organizing, promoting, or similar,may entail IMO a liability beyond a personal guilt trip if something goes wrong….

FWW, I’m not advocatin’ against, just sayin’
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Old 05-13-16, 06:46 AM
  #31  
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…and another thing, @FB.

Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
The problem with finding "good definitive" information or videos is tat there's close to zero agreement on the smartest way to ride bikes. And everybody is convinced that his way is right and everybody else is wrong.

IMO --- and for the record, I think I'm right --- there's more than one way to approach urban bicycling, and no way is right for everybody or every condition. There are times I'll take the lane, times I'll ride to the right, times I'll hop on an uncrowded sidewalk. I'll choose roads based on pavement, traffic volume and speed, lane width and overall quality of ride. In short, it's all situational, and the key to staying safety is to understand the variables and adjust your conduct accordingly….
I recently posted to this Road Cycling thread, ”Forming an attachment to the roads”

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I once categorized the roads I ride on in reverse order of cycling desirability (couldn’t find the quote, and this is a recollection) as heavy commercial, urban downtown, light commercial, urban/suburban residential, exurban and rural. I had a special term for those intimate, tree-lined, low volume, grass abutted roads, often without lines:

Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I have a personal term for such roads as “enchanted,” and the stretches I encounter on my usual routes are very short, but here they went for a few miles each…
Originally Posted by WalksOn2Wheels View Post
…I wondered how bored I would get with the roads, but then realized that there are enough of them and they change day to day depending on weather (mostly wind) [and time of day]. A ride today will be different from a ride 2 days from now. You can have a good or bad day and so can the roads. We'll have lots of good and bad times together I think.
Note to the OP, @Eds0123. Maybe your colleague should start riding some enchanted roads early in the morning, and gradually progress to more difficult roads and times.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 05-13-16 at 06:50 AM.
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Old 05-13-16, 08:21 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Did you learn how to drive by watching videos?
Yes. Dukes of Hazzard to be exact.

I was rough on my first few cars.
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