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Does the bike really go faster, or the person?

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Does the bike really go faster, or the person?

Old 12-01-16, 06:17 PM
  #26  
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The cyclist on the bike and the bike should be going at the same rate of speed..




Although, If Its stolen the bike will go faster than You , standing there agape , watching it be Nicked.





...

Last edited by fietsbob; 12-03-16 at 10:43 AM.
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Old 12-01-16, 06:36 PM
  #27  
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IME, both contribute to speed, but not to the same extent.

IMO the relative importance of the bike vs the engine is roughly (very roughly) 10 vs. 90%. Let's no quibble the numbers, but I'll stand by my belief that the engine is much more important than the bike.

Also, as pointed out by others, commutes and urban riding are different than the open road riding we all prefer. Stop lights, intersections, traffic, etc. all contribute to start to end average speeds much lower than what anyone would see out on the open road.

So, whether you train more, or spend dough to improve the bike, you won't see a great reduction in commuting time, unless you're pretty new with lots of upside room.
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Old 12-01-16, 07:55 PM
  #28  
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This morning I woke up 1/2 hr late. So I pushed it all the way with my fat bike and got to work in 19 minutes. Normally, it would take me about 22 minutes. No snow on the ground.

On my summer road bike, pushing it to work takes me 17 minutes.

Two traffic lights on the way, so that could add or subtract 1 minute either way.
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Old 12-02-16, 12:23 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by College3.0 View Post
Follow up question...... for those of you who commute 50+ minutes one way (which is what mine is averaging to be right now).

What do you think about while you are riding? Do you ever feel lonesome?

I really like riding my bike to work, and for health and other reasons I'd love to do it every day. So far the longest streak I've done is 4 consecutive days in a row.

I like the exercise. I just can't shake how lonely it is. It's possibly the only real obstacle left between me and daily cycling.

Possibly this is a personal problem. I'm just curious if anyone else feels the same, and if so, how do you convince yourself to ride anyway. I thought about getting some earbuds and an MP3 player..... but I ride through traffic and rely heavily on peripheral hearing for safety and decision making.

thanks again for your thoughts.
I enjoy the alone time. Cycling, swimming and running I find somewhat meditative - I can be alone with my thoughts. Come up to a solution to a problem. Think about philosophy. Or about a chick at work with a great ass. Or just enjoy the ride.
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Old 12-02-16, 12:39 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by College3.0 View Post
Follow up question...... for those of you who commute 50+ minutes one way (which is what mine is averaging to be right now).

What do you think about while you are riding? Do you ever feel lonesome?
I think about all sorts of things, from engineering or design problems to what's coming up in the day, to you name it, though often simply ideas prompted by what I see along the way.

There's no way I'd ever get lonesome in an hour or even a day. Overall, I'm my second best company, after my wife. I've spent long stretches (multiple days) without human company, and am very happy doing so. Maybe that's why after cycling for decades, I've taken up scuba diving.
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Old 12-02-16, 08:27 AM
  #31  
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started commuting with a beat up old mountain bike with knobby tires & a bent crank arm that I found in the trash, eventually, several bikes later, wound up on a modern road bike. so yeah, changing bikes can make a difference in commute time
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Old 12-02-16, 08:31 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by College3.0 View Post
Someone suggested to me that I could get a "faster" bike if I want my commute to not take so long. But doesn't the condition of the person riding the bike determine the speed?
It's definitely both, and while the engine (i.e., the person) matters more, the bike can be upgraded a lot quicker.

Will it make a difference in your commute times? That depends on many things, such as: how fast is the bike you're beginning with (if it's already relatively "fast", any improvement is going to be marginal), how many traffic lights you have enroute, how many hills, how much stuff you carry on your bike.

Up until a few days ago I had a 20-km (13 miles) commute for a while. The speed difference between my faster cyclocross bike with clipless pedals and my hybrid beater (which is still fairly aero for a hybrid) was significant: 50-55 minutes vs 65-70 minutes. Also, I once rode that distance on a "comfort" bike (which was so painfully slow, I couldn't describe the ride as comfortable at all), and was shocked to see it took me a full hour and a half.
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Old 12-02-16, 08:45 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by College3.0 View Post
Follow up question...... for those of you who commute 50+ minutes one way (which is what mine is averaging to be right now).

What do you think about while you are riding? Do you ever feel lonesome?
I am an introvert, so I like being alone. Most of us don't spend nearly enough time with just our thoughts; we keep ourselves distracted with work, socializing, TV, and cats on the internet. Riding can be a good way to clear your head and examine who you really are. It's a bit like meditation that way. On the other hand, if you ride fast, pain will distract you from any thoughts of loneliness.

Btw, I do listen to music on my commutes sometimes. tI does help me go faster, and a lot of the times it makes the ride more enjoyable. My commutes have been a mix of trails and roads, and I find that I can still maintain situational awareness with earbuds in. But that's a personal choice; don't do it if you don't think you can do it safely (also, some places may have laws about riding with headphones).

I'm just curious if anyone else feels the same, and if so, how do you convince yourself to ride anyway.
While I don't ever feel lonely on rides, I often feel lazy and think that maybe today, just this one time, I could take a bus or an Uber or something. It does help that we don't own a car, and that public transportation from home to anywhere I've worked in the last few years has been pretty bad. However, a stop for an express bus directly to my most recent place of work was about a 15-minute ride away, and was close to my route to work. So sometimes, when I was feeling lazy or tired, I told myself that if riding still sucked 15 minutes in, I'd just ride over to the bus stop and take the bus the rest of the way. I availed myself of that option exactly zero times.
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Old 12-02-16, 09:39 AM
  #34  
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Lonely? Never. I do relish some time alone though. Quiets the voices in my head. I am concentrating on the task at hand when biking. One reason I really like mt biking is the focus. No other stuff enters your thoughts except for the next one or 2 turns. On one of my tours I went almost a whole day without taking to someone. I think more folks these days could use some time to be present, focus on the task at hand and not multi task all the time. Works for me anyway.
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Old 12-02-16, 09:52 AM
  #35  
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Sure, the bike makes a difference but often not as much as the weather, red lights, traffic and how tired your legs are feeling. When I commute on one of my faster bikes, it usually takes me about 5-10 minutes less time each way. My round-trip commute is about 32 miles. On a good day, riding one of my faster bikes, I can complete the roundtrip commute in 1:50-2:00 hours. On a tough day, riding one of my slower bikes, my RT commute can take 2:15-2:20 hours.

I have had relatively fast commutes on my slower bikes on days when everything was going right -- tailwinds, few red lights, fresh legs. Alternatively, I've had slow commutes riding one of my faster bikes on days when it was windy, lots of red lights and my legs were tired. On average, however, my commutes take less time when I'm riding one of my faster bikes.
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Old 12-02-16, 10:49 AM
  #36  
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"Does the bike really go faster?"


No. This is a hoax perpetrated by the bicycle industry to sell the latest/greatest in equipment and upgrades.


I mean sure, there's a difference between a mountain bike with knobbies, and a road bike with slicks, but at some point buyers are just wasting $$$$ for bragging rights and bling. (and MAYBE a few seconds shaved off a long ride) See the road forum for plenty of examples.
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Old 12-02-16, 10:53 AM
  #37  
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for commuting, I would rank these factors in order or amount of influence on commuting speed

1: traffic/road conditions
2: person
2: tire width (rolling resistance)
4: positioning
4: clipless vs platform pedals
6: weight of the bike
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Old 12-02-16, 11:03 AM
  #38  
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I have a nearly 14 mile commute with very few lights or other occasions to stop. I'm very lucky that way. Parts of my route have very light traffic, too, especially in cold months. I'm going the opposite way of most people, and not many commute on the route north of 125 St. I can ride hard and fast if I want, and I tend to want to on a light, fast bike and tend not to want on a heavy bike. So it makes a difference for me, absolutely.
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Old 12-02-16, 11:48 AM
  #39  
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For my particular commute traffic never gets in my way and there are few controlled intersections to slow me down. I found the greatest factor influencing my speed by far is Wind. Thanks to it alone I've averaged up to 18 mph... and down to 11.
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Old 12-02-16, 12:19 PM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by spectastic View Post
for commuting, I would rank these factors in order or amount of influence on commuting speed

1: traffic/road conditions
2: person
2: tire width (rolling resistance)
4a: positioning
4b: clipless vs platform pedals
6: weight of the bike
I agree with most, though personally I would eliminate 6 and 4b from consideration, and add tire 'type' as a #2 as well. Like, slicks vs knobbies.
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Old 12-02-16, 01:28 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
I agree with most, though personally I would eliminate 6 and 4b from consideration, and add tire 'type' as a #2 as well. Like, slicks vs knobbies.
i put clipless in there because for accelerating out of the intersection and climbing, they help a LOT. I almost never use platforms anymore.

weight is generally pretty trivial, I agree. But the difference between a 20 and a 30 lbs bike is not.
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Old 12-02-16, 01:46 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by spectastic View Post
i put clipless in there because for accelerating out of the intersection and climbing, they help a LOT. I almost never use platforms anymore.

weight is generally pretty trivial, I agree. But the difference between a 20 and a 30 lbs bike is not.
I'll be honest...I've never actually used clipless pedals. I've never been able to imagine a scenario where they could help short of a race.

10 lbs difference in bikes...the "feel" is what you notice I think, not the actual difference in acceleration. I had a carbon fiber road bike, and it sure FELT like it accelerated faster because I could feel it sort of bucking under me when I pedaled hard, but that doesn't mean I was accelerating any faster.

Ok, I actually just did some calculations. Using some assumed constants (I might have flubbed a unit here, but shouldnt effect it too much...)

Acceleration at 100kg = 1.5 meters/sec2

Acceleration at 104.53kg 1.43 meters/sec2 (difference of 10 lbs)

I don't think that is something that will be noticeable on a commute other than how the bike feels under you.
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Old 12-02-16, 02:09 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
I'll be honest...I've never actually used clipless pedals. I've never been able to imagine a scenario where they could help short of a race.

10 lbs difference in bikes...the "feel" is what you notice I think, not the actual difference in acceleration. I had a carbon fiber road bike, and it sure FELT like it accelerated faster because I could feel it sort of bucking under me when I pedaled hard, but that doesn't mean I was accelerating any faster.

Ok, I actually just did some calculations. Using some assumed constants (I might have flubbed a unit here, but shouldnt effect it too much...)

Acceleration at 100kg = 1.5 meters/sec2

Acceleration at 104.53kg 1.43 meters/sec2 (difference of 10 lbs)

I don't think that is something that will be noticeable on a commute other than how the bike feels under you.
Do you have stoplights? Hills? Sketchy sections of pavement where you'd like the confidence of being securely attached?
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Old 12-02-16, 02:12 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Do you have stoplights? Hills? Sketchy sections of pavement where you'd like the confidence of being securely attached?
No hills, yes to bad pavement and stoplights.
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Old 12-02-16, 02:19 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by College3.0 View Post
What do you think about while you are riding? Do you ever feel lonesome?
I go on solo rides that last around 3 hours usually and I never feel lonely. But I never feel lonely off the bike, either. Maybe it's because I've got a great wife and daughter plus plenty of social interaction.

I love spending hours riding my bike with nothing else to think about. I just think about riding, and other odd thoughts pop into my head. I sometimes compose songs or think of dumb jokes. Here's my favorite dumb joke that came to me while riding:

Q. What dance did Mr. Kurtz dance at his bar mitzvah?
A. The hora.
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Old 12-02-16, 02:21 PM
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i think when the body's going through high exertion, then form suffers. the lagging leg can get in the way of the leading leg applying force to the cranks. with clipless, this is less of an issue, because your lagging leg can be lifted adequately such that you don't have to worry about the foot coming off the pedal. for accelerations, this is important.
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Old 12-02-16, 04:06 PM
  #47  
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I have an ebike, it's generally faster for my commute than my other bike (carbon road bike.) I can go faster on the carbon road bike, but I can only maintain the pace for about 2 minutes... all of my commutes are longer than that.
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Old 12-02-16, 05:52 PM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
For my particular commute traffic never gets in my way and there are few controlled intersections to slow me down. I found the greatest factor influencing my speed by far is Wind. Thanks to it alone I've averaged up to 18 mph... and down to 11.
Yes!

I was going to say I'd shell out big bucks for a guarantee of favorable wind conditions, but then I pictured myself commuting on a fully faired recumbent and I realized I wouldn't necessarily shell out big bucks to address the wind problem.

A rider using the drops on a road bike could probably knock out a pretty significant advantage riding into a headwind compared to a rider of similar fitness on a bike with a more upright riding position.
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Old 12-02-16, 11:07 PM
  #49  
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Yes. Wind.

Love it when it's at your back. I've managed the 20 km commute in about 40 minutes when there's a good tailwind. Same commute is an excruciating 55 minutes with a headwind. And 60+ with a more upright flat bar bike. Thank god I don't own one of those anymore! So yeah, huge difference.
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Old 12-03-16, 06:31 PM
  #50  
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The difference in time on my 25 mile commute is about 90 minutes on the road bike versus about 96 minutes on the big winter bike, assuming both have smooth tires on them. The winter bike gets ludicrously slow but that's when I have full winter kit loaded on including studded tires.
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