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Winter tires: Nokian studded tire review

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Winter tires: Nokian studded tire review

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Old 01-13-18, 03:34 AM
  #51  
alias5000
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Originally Posted by mcours2006 View Post
Are you not happy with the Schwalbe's?
No, varying (deep/deeper) snow/slush conditions are the dominating bad weather conditions here (not GTA), I'm better off with MTB tires for that. But I don't want to be caught by ice, so currently still on my SWM's. A major snow fall usually means 3-4 commutes/rides at least partially in snow/slush conditions. Considering selling them and buying some kind of Nokians - then I'll stop whining about it here
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Old 01-13-18, 07:01 AM
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Originally Posted by alias5000 View Post
No, varying (deep/deeper) snow/slush conditions are the dominating bad weather conditions here (not GTA), I'm better off with MTB tires for that. But I don't want to be caught by ice, so currently still on my SWM's. A major snow fall usually means 3-4 commutes/rides at least partially in snow/slush conditions. Considering selling them and buying some kind of Nokians - then I'll stop whining about it here
I will say the tread profile of the W106's looks more that of a MTB tires than a road tire. Under the conditions you are riding they should work better, and consider getting wider than 35 mm.
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Old 01-13-18, 07:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Slaninar View Post
Good post, agree with most (it rhymes ), except this part. I used a 2" rear (non-studded) and it worked OK in snow that was too deep for the tyre to cut down to the pavement. OK as - better than a skinnier studded tyre, far from perfect. Also, at least for me, there is a line when the snow depth is too large so I don't ride.
Did you try them back to back?

Someone else's experience could certainly be different than mine. I had the opportunity to try them back to back after a snowstorm. I tried the skinny tire bike first. It went through more snow than I thought it would, but eventually got stuck on a unplowed unused sidewalk where the snow was the deepest. I did the same route again with the 2" tire assuming it would clear it easily. It...also got stuck on the same section.

It's just 1 persons experience, but I'm curious if you had the chance to ride them back-to-back on the same route like I did.

P.S. No doubt 2" tires would handle rutted ice and such better than the marathon winter 35c's though.
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Old 01-13-18, 07:47 PM
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Pete White Cycles has a good write-up on this topic:

Studded Bicycle Tires

But here's the relevant part:

As you read through the descriptions of the various models, you'll notice that I recommend some for riding on the road, some for off road, some for pavement, and others for dirt. Some work better on plowed roads, some are better for getting out of icy ruts. It can be difficult to accurately describe the differences in performance between some of these tires. Take for example the Nokian W106 700x35 and the Nokian A10 700x32. Other than the obvious difference in width and height, these two tires are quite similar in performance, though they look different. The W106 has deeper tread blocks, which makes it better in deep snow than the A10 with its finer tread. But on clear asphalt, the A10 will have lower rolling resistance, again due to the tread. But how big is the difference?

Anyone who has spent much time on snow knows that it changes its consistency quite a bit between when it falls from the sky, until it finally melts away in the spring. Snow can go through many cycles of melting and refreezing. It packs down under its own weight, as well as under foot and the tires of cars and trucks. Snow at 29 degrees is very different from snow at 12 degrees. And these varying snow conditions affect the behavior of bicycle tires. You could have two identical bicycles and riders, one with the A10 and the other with the W106, and on Tuesday the W106 might work better on snow than the A10, when on Wednesday, the A10 could be better. Nothing has changed other than the snow, which has been on the ground another day, or perhaps has had another layer added overnight. There's really no way of predicting how two tires might compare all the time. And, the difference in rolling resistance, while real, isn't like the difference between riding a full knobby mountain bike tire and a high quality slick tubular sewup racing tire with silk casing. It's a fairly small difference. All studded winter tires are going to have high rolling resistance, compared with fast summer tires. A half hour summer commute can easily become a 35 minute commute on studded tires. And if I had to guess, I'd say the difference in riding time for that half hour commute, comparing the W106 and the A10 on clear pavement, would generally be more like a minute. So, yeah, it's real, but how important is that minute to you? Perhaps the added clearance between the tire and fender offered by the smaller A10 would be more important. Or maybe the greater distance between the road surface and the rim, due to the larger tire size in the W106 would be most important. If you're dealing with water covered potholes in Boston, it may well be. Only you know the answer to that.
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Old 01-14-18, 02:40 AM
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Originally Posted by mcours2006 View Post
I will say the tread profile of the W106's looks more that of a MTB tires than a road tire. Under the conditions you are riding they should work better, and consider getting wider than 35 mm.
Thanks!
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Old 01-14-18, 07:11 AM
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Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Did you try them back to back?

Someone else's experience could certainly be different than mine. I had the opportunity to try them back to back after a snowstorm. I tried the skinny tire bike first. It went through more snow than I thought it would, but eventually got stuck on a unplowed unused sidewalk where the snow was the deepest. I did the same route again with the 2" tire assuming it would clear it easily. It...also got stuck on the same section.

It's just 1 persons experience, but I'm curious if you had the chance to ride them back-to-back on the same route like I did.

P.S. No doubt 2" tires would handle rutted ice and such better than the marathon winter 35c's though.
Tried back to back, tried even combining 2" rear and a front Marathon Winter. 2" ones don't easily go over deeper snow, but are a bit better than the narrower tyres. Of course, even wider tyres will perform better. For my city and the winters we have, as well as the way roads are cleared, Marathon Winters are the best overall, although on some sections a different tyre would suit better.
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