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Riding my new bike on winter roads

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Riding my new bike on winter roads

Old 02-14-17, 01:51 PM
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Fritzov
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Riding my new bike on winter roads

I'm getting my new Salsa Fargo this Friday.

My plan is to use it as all year around commuter.

As a brand new bike what should I do to take best care of it when biking on the winter roads?. We don't have any snow at the moment but they will be throwing salt on the roads for at least another month as soon as the temperature drops below freezing.
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Old 02-14-17, 02:08 PM
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Throw a set of fenders with long front mudguards, like SKS Longboards. Spray it down after each dirty ride. Dry. Lube. Repeat.
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Old 02-14-17, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by mcours2006 View Post
Throw a set of fenders with long front mudguards,....
+1
Really long. Like almost ground-dragging long. Make your own if you can't get them.
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Old 02-14-17, 02:25 PM
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Great bike, agree on the fenders. Make sure you give the bike a good spring cleaning as well. Snow and salt are tough on bikes.
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Old 02-14-17, 02:31 PM
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Winter bikes work well for me here in MA. Salt, sand and slush are brutal on bikes.
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Old 02-14-17, 03:16 PM
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It's now like we get many snow days in south Sweden but they really loves that salt on the roads.

Should I mostly be concern about replacapble parts or will the salt affect the frame as well.
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Old 02-14-17, 05:25 PM
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Wax the frame and metal bits you can with good automotive wax before you start riding it.
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Old 02-15-17, 09:37 AM
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Frankly, I wouldn't worry too much about the finishes on surfaces. Waxing the frame and metal bits is probably the most ineffective thing you can do. It won't hurt but it won't make much difference either.

The problem...and your enemy...is salt! You need to protect against salt and the corrosion it encourages. Part of that is removal by spraying it off from time to time but the biggest issue is keeping the salt out of threads and especially keeping it out of threads of dissimilar metals like steel and aluminum. I've seen a couple of bikes at my local co-op recently where people dry fitted pedals to cranks and then rode the bikes hard through the winter. The pedals will never come off.

Grease the pedals. Grease anything that has threads on it. Grease anything where dissimilar metals (and some similar metals) come in contact with each other. The grease does more than make installation easier, it serves as a barrier to water infiltration and, more importantly, as a barrier to galvanic corrosion that can occur between dissimilar metals. In other words, grease the pedals threads, the seatpost, the stem/steer tube interface, the threads on the rear derailer, the water bottle cage bolts, the stem bolts, the bolts on the shifters and the brake levers, the star nut bolt for the headset cap, and the affixing bolts of the crankset.

Thankfully most of these are greased from the manufacturer (derailer, stems bolts, shifter and brake lever clamp bolts) but some of them aren't. Don't take apart something like the derailer or brakes or shifters as those are adequately greased but the bolts that affix the parts to the bike may not be greased. Crank bolts and pedals tend to not be greased as well as seatposts and steer tubes.

Something else you can do is use a chain with a rust inhibitor coating. I installed KMC ECO PROTEQ chains on winter bikes a couple of seasons ago. They aren't cheap but they do resist rusting and run quieter as a result.
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Old 02-15-17, 10:15 AM
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Well, the best answer is don't ride it.

That said, I bought a bike a few months ago, and can't keep off of it.

The salt will get in the frame, and eventually the downtube around the bottom bracket will start to corrode from the inside. There are little drain holes in most frames to minimize it.

Any component that is not made of a high grade metal will rust. Usually this is the chain and some of the hardware associated with the brakes.

Keep the chain lubed! I agree on fenders. I don't use them in the summer (other than a seat post fender in the rear), but in the winter they are great.
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Old 02-15-17, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Grease the pedals. Grease anything that has threads on it. Grease anything where dissimilar metals (and some similar metals) come in contact with each other. The grease does more than make installation easier, it serves as a barrier to water infiltration and, more importantly, as a barrier to galvanic corrosion that can occur between dissimilar metals. In other words, grease the pedals threads, the seatpost, the stem/steer tube interface, the threads on the rear derailer, the water bottle cage bolts, the stem bolts, the bolts on the shifters and the brake levers, the star nut bolt for the headset cap, and the affixing bolts of the crankset.

+1 to all of the above. And don't forget the brake and derailer cable adjusters - those are usually shiny metal just waiting to rust solid.
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Old 02-15-17, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Fritzov View Post
As a brand new bike what should I do to take best care of it when biking on the winter roads?
As soon as you get it bump it against something in your garage to scrape the paint. If you scrape down to the metal cover it up with some touch-up paint. I know this sounds goofy, but the first scratch is the hardest. If you're going to ride the bike in winter you need to stop thinking of it like it's a brand new bike. If you can change that thought process without scratching it, all the better. Personally, I need to see that first chip in the paint. (I'm more than half serious about this.)

Another thing to prepare yourself for is that every shiny bit of metal is going to stop being shiny. Every bolt is going to collect water in the bolt head and rust (don't let the shiny chrome polish fool you -- it's going to rust). Take the care mentioned above to grease everything and make sure nothing bonds to the frame and to keep out as much corrosion as you can, but really don't sweat the little things. Just understand what's a problem and what isn't. Applying frame saver is a good idea.

Don't underestimate how long your front fender needs to be. A mud flap six inches off the ground might protect your knees but it will let the front tire throw slop directly onto the drivetrain. Picture a line between where the front tire touches the ground and the bottom of the crank. You want to block that line.

Finally, and I can't emphasize this enough, if anything anyone has said here freaks you out and makes you think you shouldn't ride your new bike in winter conditions ignore it. Your bike is made to do this. You're getting advice from people who are obsessed with their bikes. Everyone giving you that advice rides bikes that they love in really bad weather conditions. Nothing reduces the value of a bike more than not using it.
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Old 02-15-17, 12:48 PM
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Ha! Listen to Alan K. It so happens I’m expecting a bike for just that, winter commuting :-)
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Old 02-15-17, 06:56 PM
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If you do nothing, your bike will still fare much better on salty roads than your car would have.
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Old 02-15-17, 07:23 PM
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Winter roads? the roads I ride are used all seasons of the year.
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Old 02-16-17, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by InTheRain View Post
Winter roads? the roads I ride are used all seasons of the year.
sarcastic and funny thanks for the chuckle.
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Old 02-16-17, 03:59 PM
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What cyccommute said, plus your new bike is very durable and the parts are well thought out.

I think my Fargo is 4 now, lots of winter commuting, overnight winter bike packing, dusty trails. Still going strong. Enjoy all 4 seasons.

I have the front cascadia fender for mine, but have not installed it yet even though the back has been on for about three years now. I have a shock board on the front, enough to keep the slush out of my face. Like it was said above, if your front doesn't come almost all the way to the ground you will still need to keep the bike clean.

[IMG][/IMG]

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Old 02-17-17, 01:47 AM
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Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
Well, the best answer is don't ride it.

That said, I bought a bike a few months ago, and can't keep off of it.

The salt will get in the frame, and eventually the downtube around the bottom bracket will start to corrode from the inside. There are little drain holes in most frames to minimize it.

Any component that is not made of a high grade metal will rust. Usually this is the chain and some of the hardware associated with the brakes.

Keep the chain lubed! I agree on fenders. I don't use them in the summer (other than a seat post fender in the rear), but in the winter they are great.
You might baby your bike too much. The frame should do OK. The chain will need replacing a little more often, but that's a small price to pay for the fun of winter riding! I think the sand and general gunk of the roads is more damaging than the salt, but I could be wrong.
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Old 02-17-17, 06:31 AM
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Riding my new bike on winter roads
Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
Well, the best answer is don't ride it.

That said, I bought a bike a few months ago, and can't keep off of itÖ.
My favorite bicycle is my expensive carbon fiber road bike, and I never take it out in any wet weather, much less winter. So I have a beater bike. For many years it was a heavy Cannondale mountain bike, not a pleasure to commute on.


Last year I bought a Specialized Diverge Elite aluminum road bike, equipped with all of the accessories for winter riding, including 30 C studded tires. Itís a fine riding bike, as smooth as the CF, but with a more solid feel. I have just resigned myself that it will take a lot of abuse, to preserve the pristine carbon fiber bike, and it's a pleasure to ride in its own right.

I donít have convenient facilities to wash it, and mostly I just wipe the chain and apply lube after a particularly sloppy ride.This first winter though has been pretty tame.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 02-17-17 at 09:38 AM.
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Old 02-17-17, 09:10 AM
  #19  
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Add me to the Pro-Fender crowd.
I converted my chains to wax this winter, very happy.

://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-frEbqoUTY

Hope this helps.



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Old 02-17-17, 09:25 AM
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Good fenders and don't worry about it. I used to do many of the things noted above, and I have stopped doing all of them. I clean my bike if I hear funny noises. I have a professional go over it thoroughly twice per year. Nothing seems to be wearing out any faster than when I was anal about things. Stop worrying, ride and enjoy it.
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Old 02-19-17, 05:51 PM
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Regarding the SKS Longboards, are there different sizes and if so what size will fit my Salsa Fargo?
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