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Old 07-10-17, 09:23 AM   #26
davei1980
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And I'd guess you have a faster time if you're following the river downstream, a little slower on the way back up...
Yes but only slightly so- I don't notice much of an elevation gain on the way home (Upriver) but it works out good that it's a little faster getting there.

I drove today because I am picking up 50 lbs of cherries from a friend that farms them- wasn't going to attempt on the bike!!
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Old 07-13-17, 08:57 AM   #27
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Thanks and that's a full on urban assault vehicle you got there!!
Nay. This is an urban assault vehicle




I advocate leaving a mountain bike as a mountain bike and finding excuses to use it while commuting. Pounding dirt is a lot more fun than just pounding pavement
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Old 07-13-17, 09:32 AM   #28
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is that rear strobe mount stressed by the rear fender?
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Old 07-13-17, 09:45 AM   #29
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is that rear strobe mount stressed by the rear fender?
No. The fender is held up by zip ties around the light mount. I can't put that much torque on it. Additionally, the light mount for the Airy is a bit odd. It's basically two plastic p-clips so the whole thing is rather flexible.
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Old 07-13-17, 09:49 AM   #30
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all the better for rough roads, eh?
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Old 07-13-17, 10:22 AM   #31
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Nay. This is an urban assault vehicle




I advocate leaving a mountain bike as a mountain bike and finding excuses to use it while commuting. Pounding dirt is a lot more fun than just pounding pavement
I like it! Now convince me to keep my shock absorber fork because everyone else has me thinking solid fork...
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Old 07-13-17, 10:49 AM   #32
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Well if it has a lockout, you'll be fine with the suspension fork..because it's not a suspension fork anymore.

I converted a road bike to more upright posture, and converted it to a 1x6. There's a handful of times I want another gear for climbing, or one for cruising. I was debating going up a few teeth on the front ring and then maybe a wider range freewheel, but that also means a new chain... I digress. The 1x setup is not without fault, it can be prone to dropping chains, and on tired days or good tailwind days, you're left wanting more.
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Old 07-13-17, 10:54 AM   #33
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I like it! Now convince me to keep my shock absorber fork because everyone else has me thinking solid fork...
I can't tell from your picture what kind of fork you have. Mine is a really good one with a really good lock out. The lockout is important for the bits where you ride on pavement while the quality is good for the times when you don't.

In other words, if you have a pogo stick for a suspension fork, it might better to get a better fork or go with a rigid one. Unfortunately, the rigid one is more limiting but cheaper.
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Old 07-13-17, 11:09 AM   #34
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I like it! Now convince me to keep my shock absorber fork because everyone else has me thinking solid fork...
If you're starting from the point of 'I want to take a cheap old mountain bike, and start commuting on it', then it probably has a suspension fork, and it's not worth the effort to replace with a suspension-corrected rigid fork.

But if your starting point is already rigid, I think most people will agree you're in better shape for urban riding.
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Old 07-13-17, 11:54 AM   #35
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I advocate leaving a mountain bike as a mountain bike and finding excuses to use it while commuting. Pounding dirt is a lot more fun than just pounding pavement
Yeah, I used to commute on my mountain bike. Caught a chain once and it ripped the rear derailleur off (for no apparent reason).

I couldn't stand not being able to mountain bike, so I bought a fixed gear for commuting (which was a a faster/easier way to commute anyway).
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Old 07-13-17, 04:40 PM   #36
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If you're starting from the point of 'I want to take a cheap old mountain bike, and start commuting on it', then it probably has a suspension fork, and it's not worth the effort to replace with a suspension-corrected rigid fork.

But if your starting point is already rigid, I think most people will agree you're in better shape for urban riding.
What does "suspension corrected" mean?

Right now the fork is a ****ty Suntour which doesn't lock out or do anything else except keep the front wheel on so it's gone either way. I used to have a neato hardtail mtb with a manitou fork which I loved which I will go with if I decide against a solid fork... just not sure what suspension corrected refers to.....

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Old 07-13-17, 04:48 PM   #37
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What do you think about the Michelins I picked out?
Outstanding tires and sleepers. For some reason Michelins don't get much love in the U.S. so it's easy to find discounts and bargains.

I've ridden a set of Michelin Protek Cross Max 700x40 tires on my heavy errand bike for a couple of years. Great riding tires despite being heavy, and bombproof.

If I wasn't so happy with Continental Speed Rides on my hybridized rigid frame mountain bike I'd put a set of Michelin Proteks or Protek Urbans on that bike. (And if the Conti Speed Rides were available in 26 I'd recommend 'em for your bike as well).
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Old 07-13-17, 05:57 PM   #38
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What does "suspension corrected" mean?
From The Man:

Suspension forks have more room above the top of the tire, to allow the suspension to move. Frames built for suspension forks are designed so that the bottom end of the head tube will normally be higher up to make room for the suspension fork's travel.
Suspension-corrected rigid forks mimic this geometry: they have longer blades to hold the head tube up to the same height a suspension fork would. If you desire to replace a suspension fork with a rigid fork, you should opt for a "suspension-corrected' rigid fork to preserve the frame's normal geometry.

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Right now the fork is a ****ty Suntour which doesn't lock out or do anything else except keep the front wheel on so it's gone either way. I used to have a neato hardtail mtb with a manitou fork which I loved which I will go with if I decide against a solid fork... just not sure what suspension corrected refers to.....
If you're replacing it for sure and already have a suspension fork you like, I'd start with that and see whether it gives you any grief. If so, buy a suspension-corrected rigid fork. If you didn't already have a suspension fork, I'd say buy rigid because it's cheaper, lighter, and well, more rigid.
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Old 07-13-17, 06:00 PM   #39
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From The Man:

Suspension forks have more room above the top of the tire, to allow the suspension to move. Frames built for suspension forks are designed so that the bottom end of the head tube will normally be higher up to make room for the suspension fork's travel.
Suspension-corrected rigid forks mimic this geometry: they have longer blades to hold the head tube up to the same height a suspension fork would. If you desire to replace a suspension fork with a rigid fork, you should opt for a "suspension-corrected' rigid fork to preserve the frame's normal geometry.


If you're replacing it for sure and already have a suspension fork you like, I'd start with that and see whether it gives you any grief. If so, buy a suspension-corrected rigid fork. If you didn't already have a suspension fork, I'd say buy rigid because it's cheaper, lighter, and well, more rigid.
Cool thank you!! I havr my eye on a couple on Amazon listed as "mountain bike forks" would you suppose those have correct geometry?
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Old 07-13-17, 06:02 PM   #40
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From The Man:

Suspension forks have more room above the top of the tire, to allow the suspension to move. Frames built for suspension forks are designed so that the bottom end of the head tube will normally be higher up to make room for the suspension fork's travel.
Suspension-corrected rigid forks mimic this geometry: they have longer blades to hold the head tube up to the same height a suspension fork would. If you desire to replace a suspension fork with a rigid fork, you should opt for a "suspension-corrected' rigid fork to preserve the frame's normal geometry.


If you're replacing it for sure and already have a suspension fork you like, I'd start with that and see whether it gives you any grief. If so, buy a suspension-corrected rigid fork. If you didn't already have a suspension fork, I'd say buy rigid because it's cheaper, lighter, and well, more rigid.
Cool - got my eye on a CF fork on Amazon for $68 - not sure if it's "suspension corrected" but it's listed as a MTB fork so I guessing it's close??
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Old 07-13-17, 08:11 PM   #41
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If you're starting from the point of 'I want to take a cheap old mountain bike, and start commuting on it', then it probably has a suspension fork, and it's not worth the effort to replace with a suspension-corrected rigid fork.
Depends. If your fork is threadless, replacing it is easy. And there are cheap crmo forks going for less than usd$15 on taobao.

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Cool - got my eye on a CF fork on Amazon for $68 - not sure if it's "suspension corrected" but it's listed as a MTB fork so I guessing it's close??
Check the axle to crown length. If it is about 440mm or more, yes. If 400mm or around there, no.
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Old 07-14-17, 08:07 AM   #42
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Depends. If your fork is threadless, replacing it is easy. And there are cheap crmo forks going for less than usd$15 on taobao.

Check the axle to crown length. If it is about 440mm or more, yes. If 400mm or around there, no.
Awesome! It's 440mm -- I just wish they'd pick metric anf stick with it!
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Old 07-15-17, 11:49 AM   #43
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Well if it has a lockout, you'll be fine with the suspension fork..because it's not a suspension fork anymore.

I converted a road bike to more upright posture, and converted it to a 1x6. There's a handful of times I want another gear for climbing, or one for cruising. I was debating going up a few teeth on the front ring and then maybe a wider range freewheel, but that also means a new chain... I digress. The 1x setup is not without fault, it can be prone to dropping chains, and on tired days or good tailwind days, you're left wanting more.

Love it! The Dorothy basket on the front is super useful I bet!!!
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Old 07-15-17, 03:29 PM   #44
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New Tires, courtesy of my little bro for free!


Specialized Nimbus 26x1.5

They were too wide for his frame but they replace my 2.10 crappy Kenda knobbies really nicely 🙃🚴🏿
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Old 07-15-17, 05:29 PM   #45
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As long as the bicycle is comfortable for you it shouldn't be a problem using a converted Fuji MTB as a commuter. I use a fully-rigid MTB as one of my commuter bicycles and just use the bigger front chain ring (no FD on it). Michellin Protek tires: I had a set of those, and didn't get any flats, but found the sidewalls cracked pretty quickly. I kept the bike indoors both at work and at home, so no sun exposure problems. After about 9 months I got rid of them.
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Old 07-15-17, 09:00 PM   #46
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As long as the bicycle is comfortable for you it shouldn't be a problem using a converted Fuji MTB as a commuter. I use a fully-rigid MTB as one of my commuter bicycles and just use the bigger front chain ring (no FD on it). Michellin Protek tires: I had a set of those, and didn't get any flats, but found the sidewalls cracked pretty quickly. I kept the bike indoors both at work and at home, so no sun exposure problems. After about 9 months I got rid of them.
I was going to get Proteks but my lil bro came through with a pair of Specialized tires too wide for his road bike frame he had set up for commuting so saved me some coin!!
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Old 07-18-17, 08:30 AM   #47
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Sweet, those look ideal for urban riding
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