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Dry bag for commuting?

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Dry bag for commuting?

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Old 04-15-18, 05:49 AM
  #26  
inicholson
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I recently replaced my commuter bag with an Ortlieb Vario - it's a backpack with 2 shoulder straps that's completely waterproof and can be converted into a pannier (handy when I need 2 bags).
Might be over budget though - it cost me Ģ120.

Alternatively, buy a cheap dry-bag (Decathlon sell them) and put it inside a rucksack.
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Old 04-15-18, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by cyrmanj View Post
And does the sling bag stays put? I have a feeling it will be dancing around as mentioned on one of the posts above due to only one shoulder strap.
Most quality sling bags have attachment points and straps that go under one arm to secure the bag from moving around
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Old 04-17-18, 06:24 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by cyrmanj View Post
Hi all,

I am currently commuting to work and in my country rainy season is starting, which is fine by me except for soaking my belongings on my backpack! I am considering using a dry bag such as the 20 liters Adventure Lion Premium Waterproof Dry Bag, I canīt post the amazon link yet but you can check it.

So my concern is, how comfortable would it be to use a 20 liters dry bag that only comes with one shoulder strap? Has anyone used a loaded dry bag to pedal for relatively short distances? Any feedback or advice would be appreciated. My average commuting distance is of about 9 miles and occasionally I will need to bring my laptop plus clothes and shoes.

Thanks in advance!
I would look for Ziploc bags to put in the backpack. I would not want to ride too long with a backpack though. It is too warm unless traveling light..


I used to put my stuff in bags in my panniers. The panniers were pretty waterproof but upgrading to Ortlieb Hi Viz panniers has been a game changer. They are totally waterproof and in my case reflective and very tough.
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Old 04-17-18, 08:04 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by RidingMatthew View Post
I would look for Ziploc bags to put in the backpack. I would not want to ride too long with a backpack though. It is too warm unless traveling light...
Completely true, it could become annoying, my commuting distance is not that long but still it gets a bit uncomfortable. Thanks!
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Old 04-19-18, 08:00 AM
  #30  
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I use two 10L draybags, one strapped onto anything cages on each side of the fork on my Troll. Shoes, change of clothes, lunch.
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Old 04-20-18, 08:17 PM
  #31  
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I use waterproof panniers -- I can literally dunk them in water to clean them off with stuff in. If you like something strapped to your back, a proper drybag suitable for marine use will work nicely since you can literally throw them overboard and they won't let any water in.

You can get them with shoulder straps. I haven't used Adventure Lion, but it looks like the real thing. I would get one that's designed to wear on your back rather than one strap though.
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Old 04-21-18, 06:59 PM
  #32  
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I went from backpacks to panniers and most recently switched it for a simple rear basket with a waterproof elastic cover. That way I can put my sleek leather work bag, clothes, and toss random items I pick up on my way to/from work in the back.

This system is a winner for me, as once off the bike, (and once my shoes and shorts are switched out), I don't look like a commuter anymore.
Whereas before, everywhere I went I had panniers or neon backpacks, which weren't the most professional items for business meetings.

This system is vetted for Vancouver, and honestly I simply do not notice or care if its raining as everything is always dry regardless.

Major caveat of this system however, is my bike is always covered or indoors on either ends of my commute.
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Old 04-23-18, 11:40 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by inicholson View Post
I recently replaced my commuter bag with an Ortlieb Vario.....
I fell in love with the Vario concept, but discovered that my chainstay is too compact, with nasty heel strike being the conclusion. I swapped the Vario the following week for a pair of Orteib low-rider bags
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Old 04-24-18, 12:49 AM
  #34  
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Seal Line do a waterproof bagpack. Has a roll top the same as their kayaking bags....
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Old 04-29-18, 06:03 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by Trevtassie View Post
Seal Line do a waterproof bagpack. Has a roll top the same as their kayaking bags....
Just looked it and itīs great, however not cheap.

In the meantime I will rely on ziplock bags because I`ve just bought a new bike and I am broke, hehe. In the future I will consider other options for hauling stuff, lately I have been carrying my laptop on my bagpack and it sucks!
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Old 05-03-18, 11:25 AM
  #36  
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I use Ortlieb pannier drybags or Arkel Drypack Cycling Backpack (also works with their seatpost rack). Both were expensive, but my stuff stayed dry when I was caught in a downpour. Worth it to me.
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Old 05-28-18, 02:02 PM
  #37  
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So, I canīt consider panniers due to the short chain stays of the bike and my heel will hit the panniers on every pedal stroke. I decided to buy an Oveja Negra Super Wedgie frame bag (only frame bag that could fit the tight 49 cms road bike geometry), that along with the seat bag will give me enough room to carry the stuff I need. And on the days that I need to carry my laptop I will put it on a plastic bag and use a bag pack.

Last week I already soaked a couple of days so once I use this new set up of seat + frame bag I will tell you how it goes.
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Old 05-28-18, 03:23 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by cyrmanj View Post
Hi all,

I am currently commuting to work and in my country rainy season is starting, which is fine by me except for soaking my belongings on my backpack! I am considering using a dry bag such as the 20 liters Adventure Lion Premium Waterproof Dry Bag, I canīt post the amazon link yet but you can check it.

So my concern is, how comfortable would it be to use a 20 liters dry bag that only comes with one shoulder strap? Has anyone used a loaded dry bag to pedal for relatively short distances? Any feedback or advice would be appreciated. My average commuting distance is of about 9 miles and occasionally I will need to bring my laptop plus clothes and shoes.

Thanks in advance!
Put a dry bag inside of a messenger bag? padded sleeve for the laptop?
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Old 05-29-18, 12:24 PM
  #39  
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I've been using a Chrome Barrage Cargo backpack for years. I've been caught in some wicked storms, and never had anything inside get wet. It's a roll-top with a waterproof liner. Rain isn't getting in unless it's submerged.
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Old 06-08-18, 06:15 PM
  #40  
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Today I used for the first time the Oveja Negraīs Super Wedgie. At first I was disapointed due to its small size/cargo capability but after riding it I was amazed by how much difference it makes just moving a bit of weight closer to the bikeīs gravity center. It is now way more stable, I still feel the heavy tail due to the stuff I carry on the Revelate Designs Pika seat bag but I feel now more comfortable and in control than before. I still need to use a very small backpack to carry my shoes, the rest of the stuff I was able to cramped it between the seat and frame bag and keep them dry!

This is how it looks:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BjyHzLsn...ken-by=cyrmanj
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Old 06-13-18, 08:01 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by cyrmanj View Post
I am currently commuting to work and in my country rainy season is starting, which is fine by me except for soaking my belongings on my backpack! I am considering using a dry bag such as the 20 liters Adventure Lion Premium Waterproof Dry Bag, I canīt post the amazon link yet but you can check it.
Dry bags are overkill for a rainy commute. They're made for boating and other activities where the bag may end up in the water, where rain is just falling down and splashing up onto the commuter's bags. I've had four different sets of water resistant panniers, and as long as they're closed properly, the main compartments stay dry. Rain covers are a good idea for exterior zipper compartments where the zippers may not be properly shielded, but either bagging things in those compartments, or just using them for non-water-sensitive items like tools and spare tubes will get around that as well.
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Old 06-14-18, 06:07 PM
  #42  
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^ Agreed.Iīve should focused my concern from the beginning to backpack vs. seat/frame bag or panniers. Today I commuted back home with the workīs laptop and it was all good, I carried it on a small backpack and barely feel it, not uncomfortable at all, I just covered it with a plastic bag in case it rained. The rest of my stuff was distributed between my frame and seat bags.
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Old 06-14-18, 07:45 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by KD5NRH View Post
Dry bags are overkill for a rainy commute. They're made for boating and other activities where the bag may end up in the water, where rain is just falling down and splashing up onto the commuter's bags. I've had four different sets of water resistant panniers, and as long as they're closed properly, the main compartments stay dry. Rain covers are a good idea for exterior zipper compartments where the zippers may not be properly shielded, but either bagging things in those compartments, or just using them for non-water-sensitive items like tools and spare tubes will get around that as well.
I agree with this logic. When I was looking for panniers I was able to get a deal because i bought the Ortlieb Sportpackers instead of the roll top style panniers which weren't on discount at the time. I can see how the roll top is nice for touring sealing out rain and dust but I bought them for commuting, I doubt I'll be fording any rivers or using the panniers for flotation any time soon.
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Old 06-14-18, 08:18 PM
  #44  
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I looked up the Langster and see that is a fix gear. The vast percentage of my commuting has been fix gear, year 'round. Running the smaller front Ortliebs on LowRider racks is the way to carry weight on fix gears, especially if your rides include any kind of hills. The weight on LowRider panniers (even a lot of weight) affects the bike handling very little, This is really appreciated when you are rocking the bike to climb that stiff one out of the saddle. No more feeling that weight trying to leverage the bike out of your hands or having to climb standing with everything you've got (life while climbing on loaded fix gears ) while striving to keep the bike stock still to spare your wrists.

I went to LowRiders and front panniers for my fix gear 30 years ago. Spent two winters living at the highest point in Ann Arbor and coming home loaded with books all winter. Buying the Ortliebs 20 years go was the next big step up. Since then, I haven't seen a better system to lust after.

The challenge you have would be running LowRiders with that CF fork. If it were me, I'd seriously consider having a local framebuilder build me a steel fork with fittings for both a fender and LowRiders. (Life with full fenders is so much better. In the summer you can swap forks.)

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Old 06-17-18, 08:21 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by 79pmooney View Post
...
The challenge you have would be running LowRiders with that CF fork. If it were me, I'd seriously consider having a local framebuilder build me a steel fork with fittings for both a fender and LowRiders. (Life with full fenders is so much better. In the summer you can swap forks.)

Ben
Thanks, I wasn`t even aware of that type of front fork rack, interesting that you mention it does not affects much the handling. But I will take me a lot of convincing to let go the CF fork for a steel one, especially with the awful condition of the roads here. BTW kudos to you for commuting with a fixed gear, I am riding single speed and do not dare to be fixed with the hills I have to tackle, maybe one day I will...
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Old 06-18-18, 07:09 AM
  #46  
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Coincidentally a Langster has been showing up here at work lately, and I was just thinking nice bike for commuting and running around.

My main commuter is a steel fixed gear, and while I have a rack and trunk bag on it I sometimes use a bag that hooks on the drop bars. While that does affect handling as 79pmooney says, I find that I adapt to it fairly quickly and then don't really notice, and otherwise it's the most convenient. I'm using that on my road bike also.
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